Author Topic: Occupations and Professions in your family  (Read 92410 times)

Christopher

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2006, 02:41:09 AM »
Hiya Mageeka, Hugh Dunbar built Gilford Spinning Mill in the 1830s. I think there was probably a lot of truth in your Dad's statement, Mageeka.

Colette, a Spinning Master would have been a foreman or manager in a Mill. He would have had a good working knowledge of the various jobs people did in the mill. If any of the workers had a problem he would have been able to solve it so that they could keep on working with the minimum of delay.

gthomp045

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2006, 05:06:49 PM »
My g grandfather was a 'whitesmith' on his son's wedding record.
Living in Sailortown and probably working in the docks or shipyard I found this to be a metal finisher/burnisher as opposed to a blacksmith.

My other g grandfather was a hawker. I guess this is a street pedlar rather than one practicing falconry (joke).

Regards,
Gary

linen

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2006, 11:47:50 AM »
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Christopher

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #18 on: December 15, 2006, 12:52:19 PM »
Hello linen,

Welcome to Belfast Forum.

Is there a Forum where people can post queries about Linen? The ancestors of a great many people researching their family history lived in Ireland and were connected with the linen industry ... either working as weavers in their cottages or later moving to the towns and cities and working in the large mills. The ancestors of some people also owned mills or were merchants buying and exporting the linen and distributing it overseas. Otto Jaffe was one such person .. like a great many others there appears to be little known about his connections in the linen industry. Would there be boxes of unindexed documents of the history of the mills stored somewhere in the same way that there are thirty boxes containing about 10,000 unindexed wills of Irish soldiers who fought in the Great War sitting in the National Archives in Dublin?

It's one matter for individuals sending queries to the Irish Linen Centre and Lisburn Museum but the fact of the matter is that there is a large audience interested in the history of the linen mills and those who worked in them. A Forum for those whose ancestors worked in the mills would be brilliant.

The Copeland Linen site is great if people want to know what life was like for those who worked in the mills, Ferguson's site is good for definitions and the Irish Linen Guild introduced a site in April this year which gives a very brief history. These sites, good as they may be are not enough as many queries regarding weaving and linen are regularly posted on Family History sites all over the net. If they could be directed to a specific site in the same way that queries about Belfast can be directed to one site people wishing to give assistance would not be wasting their time surfing the net and coming across the queries by chance.

Best Wishes,

Christopher


teap

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #19 on: December 15, 2006, 04:10:55 PM »
Hey Christopher my Grt Grt granda William Doyle was a bleacher in Tullylish, and 5 of his children that i know of came to belfast my grt granda John Doyle (Gas fitter/plumber) included, 2 of the girls Maggie Doyle and Lizzie Doyle worked in the mill in Conway street 1880s. I wonder if Jason Diamond Banbridge Geneology could help me?

Colette

Christopher

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #20 on: December 15, 2006, 05:06:52 PM »
I'm not sure Colette. I think Jason has helped you before. I read a few messages posted
by you on RootsChat at the beginning of this year about Banbridge Genealogical Services 8)

coralc

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2007, 02:44:27 PM »
My paternal Grandmother, Ellen/Eleanor/Nell Anderson was a "half-timer", working  part-time in the mill & going to school part-time, possibly as young as 10 years of age. I think she lived  in Cumber at the time (around 1893) Family stories aren't always accurate, does this sound historically likely, or is it one of those"When I was a wean " tales ? Regards, Coral
Family History-Carrickfergus, McIlwaine, Boyd Weatherup . Belfast,Clarke, Boyd. Dublin,William Hamilton Clarke-all clues & suggestions gratefully rece

eddiec

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2007, 09:37:51 PM »
As far as I am aware that did happen... in semi rural areas rather than Belfast generally... I couldn't give you a source though...

I take it you mean Comber Co Down...
Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please.  <i>Mark Twain</i>

Christopher

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2007, 09:50:44 PM »
I'm inclined to agree with you Eddie. I'm sure there were half timers. I've had a quick look at a few websites and noticed that there were half timers at Paisley in Scotland. The young female workers would attend this school and work in the mills on alternate days, hence the name "Half-time". I see no reason why the situation would have been different in the north of Ireland.

Bluebell

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #24 on: January 08, 2007, 01:19:16 PM »
Hi Folks,

What trade name would be given to a man who installed Anchors on Ships ?

Cheers
Bluebell

Christopher

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #25 on: January 09, 2007, 08:45:12 AM »
Hi Folks,

What trade name would be given to a man who installed Anchors on Ships ?

Cheers
Bluebell

It's good to see someone around here asks the right question on the right thread, Bluebell. I thought I was going nuts for a minute and wondered where the answers were to this question as Mary, Eddie and I had a chat about this the other evening. Here's what we said on the Keep me right thread.

Bluebell

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2007, 01:45:31 PM »
Hi Christopher, Thanks for getting back to me, however I have found out from a family member - Tradesmen who installed Anchors on Ships were called "Engine Fitters" - makes sense to me - an Anchor needs an engine to make it work. When the engine was fitted, the Anchor was then installed with the help of a Crane.

My apologies to Mary - she did say she would post my question on the Forum, but I couldn't find her post in this thread, I thought she had got busy and had forgotten.

Another mystery solved! Ain't life grand  ::)


Christopher

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #27 on: January 12, 2007, 05:12:20 PM »
I've more information on half timers. There's an article in "Ireland's Own" magazine titled "When Cotton Was King" It's part 6 of a mini series about Early Belfast by Verdun Ball. In the 1880s children working in the mills were half timers. They worked part of the day in the mill and then attended school. The law stated that a room in the mill had to be set aside until such time as a school was built. It wasn't until 1892 that a law was passed stating that all children had to attend school ... until that date it was only compulsory for the half timers to attend. Half timing was not phased out until the 1930s. The conditions in the mills were terrible and many suffered from ill health. There was also the danger that the workers could catch tuberculosis.   

AL CAPONE

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #28 on: January 12, 2007, 06:13:08 PM »
My sister Dolores was once a HOLER-she put holes in the gravy rings! ;D

coralc

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Re: Occupations and Professions in your family
« Reply #29 on: January 12, 2007, 11:29:19 PM »
Thanks ,Christopher. I'll have to see if "Irelands Own" has anything on line. regards, Coral
Family History-Carrickfergus, McIlwaine, Boyd Weatherup . Belfast,Clarke, Boyd. Dublin,William Hamilton Clarke-all clues & suggestions gratefully rece