Author Topic: Exiles vs Residents  (Read 10174 times)

Christopher

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2006, 12:59:44 AM »
I wonder where all you guys were asked these questions? Was it mainly in the workplace? I've rarely had the problem. I did not not notice it in the insurance office where I worked. It did not arise when I went to dances or the clubs of which I was a member and when I was a commercial traveller no one asked and if they did it was as a matter of interest. Most of the Irish lads in the circus came from the Republic but I was accepted as one of them with no problem. We had a troupe of Moroccan tumblers on the show and we all got on well together. There were a couple of lads who drank far too much and were not too popular. Would you believe it .. they were both English.

eastender

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2006, 02:19:45 AM »
You're extremely lucky Christopher! I won't belabour this topic, but I can identify with everything giannineo said.

Quick example:
When I was very young at Greenwood, I was very close friends with boys whose Da's were "white collar workers." (My Da wore white overalls  ;)) I was classified as 'poor.' We lived in a rented house although the other boys didn't care about wealth and social status at that time.
When we were 8 we were scattered to other schools. I went to Strandtown, they went to Cabin Hill. I wanted to still keep them as friends, but was no longer allowed to come over to their houses. I couldn't understand why and it was never explained.
When I was 11 I failed my 11+ exam and lost more friends from Strandtown, because they passed theirs and were now going to grammar schools. One lad actually told me he could no longer be friends, in the front room of our house!
When I went to Ashfield, I was in with boys from Sydenham and around the shipyard. When they heard where I was from, they called me posh and a snob, never mind that I lived in a Corporation rental house and my Da worked in overalls. Residence location and the fact we had a back garden and bath tub was all their narrow minds needed to decide.

In 1967 I met 2 brothers at a Boy Scout function. We shared the same sporting interests and I discovered they lived on the Earlswood Road. Their names were Brendan and David and their surname started with O'. One day, I decided to walk home via the Earlswood Road and dropped in at their house. We happily played football for about an hour. Their house backed onto Strandtown School grounds and I wondered why they hadn't gone there for Primary school. They now went to St. Malachy's and St. Augustine's on the other side of town.
When I got home, I was asked what had delayed me. I said what I had been doing. When I innocently said they boys' names, I was verbally attacked and told under no circumstances to fraternize with THEM again.

Sorry for goin on at length, but does that fill you in on what you missed?
People want to know how much you care, before they care how much you know.

Christopher

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2006, 02:43:37 AM »
Bejaysus! I hope they are not on the right road to heaven :D My sister and I read Authur Mee's Children's Encyclopedia when we were little. I remember one of the coloured pictures in one of the volumes .. it sticks in my mind .. all children of all nations in their national costumes.

Another thing that sticks in my mind is a walk I had with my dad along the beach at Cloughy one summer evening when I was about eight or nine. He told me it did not matter about the money people had in their pocket or what they did for a job. It did not matter where they lived, be it a big house or a small house, or where they went to school. If they were willing to be friendly then make friends with them. He told me not to be snobbish and look down upon people, or be antagonistic toward them, because their opinions were slightly different. All kids at school should be taught those few words. I found that they were very valuable words to learn. The poem "Desiderata" by Max Ehrmann should be said each day at assembly in all schools.

 

weedotty

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #18 on: September 11, 2006, 05:16:47 AM »
Eastender

I did not have the same experiences as you growing up in Belfast.
I was brought up to respect everyone, irrespective of religion.
A person being a sh%t head, did not necessarily have anything to do with with their religion.
Please let me know the examples of class distinction on this board .

This post is actually by BLOOMFIELD, my wife had logged in on my computer. Have to watch these women . ;D

Christopher

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2006, 05:25:19 AM »
What do you mean dotty? Do you want names named? How else can examples be given. Seems to me that eastenders parent's attitude was a bit off. Parents should be glad their kids have friends. Kids sometimes play an important part in adults getting to know each other. They are more than capable of breaking the ice.

BLOOMFIELD

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2006, 05:31:44 AM »
Christopher

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What do you mean dotty? Do you want names named? How else can examples be given.

Why not name names, I just hope that I'm not one of the perceived snobs. ::)
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Christopher

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2006, 05:35:47 AM »
This is interesting phraseology. A touch amateur psychology can be a dangerous thing :D

The one lack of tolerance you forgot to mention is still rampant and I've detected it clearly on this forum too. It is the so-called, perceived class structure that identifies and categorizes people because of the way they look, talk (or write  ) and especially because of perceived education or lack of it.

Twocoats, There is still religous intolerance and now there is a racial intolerance against the Polish and other European immigrants. Of course there is intolerance in the north of Ireland. It's a small percentage that is intolerant. Tell me a country in the world where there are not one or two intolerant people. Did all the exiles leave for precisely the same reason? They probably left for many different reasons. Some left because in their line of business there was no more they needed to do here and there was a lot to do elsewhere.  I'm thinking of a local business that started in Cloughmills, moved to Masserene and became a national company and then moved overseas and is now a large international company. That's progress.

eastender

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2006, 06:21:57 AM »
This is more interesting phraseology. It's not dangerous, but I found it unnecessary.

Where did you go to school  Do we have some people here from the top grammar schools of the north of Ireland?

These questions opened a thread under Belfast History - Schools back in June.

Why not put the question mark after the first question and leave it? The second question describes the school snobbery I mentioned.

BTW. I enjoyed the amateur psychology reference.  ;D ;D

Don't worry Bloomfield!
People want to know how much you care, before they care how much you know.

BLOOMFIELD

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #23 on: September 11, 2006, 06:35:57 AM »
My wife and myself left Belfast in 1971.
Not because of the so-called TROUBLES
The "TROUBLES" were only the figment in the mind of the ones who wanted to be troubled.
I left Belfast because I thought that there was no future for me in Belfast, lots of people in N. Ireland were still living in the 17 th. Century.
When I lived in Belfast, I did not care what religion my neighbours were, I was a Protestant, I dated Catholic girls, I had Catholic friends, but there was always the "[censored]" who wanted to re- live the 20's revolution.
Since arriving in Canada, I realize how stupid the bigotry in N. Ireland really is.
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When will the I.R.A. pay Compensation to their Innocent Victims or Relatives.

Christopher

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #24 on: September 11, 2006, 07:10:58 AM »
This is more interesting phraseology. It's not dangerous, but I found it unnecessary.

Where did you go to school  Do we have some people here from the top grammar schools of the north of Ireland?


OK It was just a question and no snob value intended. There is a league table of schools throughout the UK published annually. Those at the top of the list tend to send more students on to Oxford and Cambridge.

I was on a site the other day. A guy from Dublin posted a message as he is about to start studying at Queens. He said he had heard 75% of the students at Queens were of the Catholic faith and wanted to know which Universities were attended by Protestants. It's an interesting question.


The "TROUBLES" were only the figment in the mind of the ones who wanted to be troubled.

When I lived in Belfast, I did not care what religion my neighbours were, I was a Protestant, I dated Catholic girls, I had Catholic friends,

Two points here Bloomfield. re the Troubles and only the figment in the minds ... try telling that to the members of the Collie Dog Club. You'd be extremely lucky if your comments were accepted graciously.

Re the comment on religion ... obviously you did care otherwise why differentiate ... you and your friends were Christians .. thats where the buck stops. Why have you not said your friends were Presbyterians, Baptists .. ach the list is endless so why differentiate between one branch of Christianity and another.

BLOOMFIELD

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #25 on: September 11, 2006, 07:34:50 AM »
Christopher

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members of the Collie Dog Club

I assume that you mean "The La Mon " disgrace.
This was caused by "People"  (for want of a better word) who were "Troubled". I doubt that the Collie Club were "troubled". (until they were cowardly mowed down )
My Sister -in - law just missed the bombing as her meeting had been postponed to the following week.

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Re the comment on religion ... obviously you did care otherwise why differentiate ... you and your friends were Christians .. thats where the buck stops. Why have you not said your friends were Presbyterians, Baptists .. ach the list is endless so why differentiate between one branch of Christianity and another.

I did not differentiate with people, that is why I mentioned that I was friendly with people of a different religion persuasion.

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He said he had heard 75% of the students at Queens were of the Catholic faith and wanted to know which Universities were attended by Protestants. It's an interesting question.

I do not know whether it was true or not, but when I lived in Belfast I always believed that Queens was for the Catholics, and Trinity was for the Protestants --- very Irish eh ?
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BLOOMFIELD

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #26 on: September 11, 2006, 08:07:16 PM »
Christopher and Eastender

Quote
OK It was just a question and no snob value intended. There is a league table of schools throughout the UK published annually. Those at the top of the list tend to send more students on to Oxford and Cambridge

It is a fact that the Graduates of Oxford and Cambridge (chinless wonders that lots of them are  ;) ) go on to be "Movers and shakers" in the running of the Country, making Laws, judging the guilty, establishing Foreign Policy,running the Military, Captains of Industry etc,.

When one sees the " fine job "  >:( that they are doing  ;D ;D ;D ;D
should they really have any reason to be snobs. ::)

Some definition of a Snob :-

1. a person who imitates, cultivates, or slavishly admires social superiors and is condescending or overbearing to others. 
2. a person who believes himself or herself an expert or connoisseur in a given field and is condescending toward or disdainful of those who hold other opinions or have different tastes regarding this field: a musical snob. 

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I really love this

[Origin: 177585; orig. uncert; first used as a nickname for a cobbler or cobbler's apprentice, hence a townsman, someone of low class or lacking good breeding, commoner, hence someone who imitates persons of higher rank]
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When will the I.R.A. pay Compensation to their Innocent Victims or Relatives.

BLOOMFIELD

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #27 on: September 11, 2006, 08:29:22 PM »
DID YOU KNOW

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The Queen's Colleges (Ireland) Act 1845 (An Act to enable Her Majesty to endow new Colleges for the Advancement of Learning in Ireland) established the colleges with the intention that they would provide for Roman Catholic demands for university education, since the existing Trinity College, Dublin was regarded as Anglican
. [1] In order to appease Protestant demands, the colleges were not permitted to give instruction in theology. The result was that the colleges became derided as the "godless colleges" Pope Pius IX even went as far as saying they were "detrimental to religion" in an official condemnation and this non-acceptance was articulated in the creation of the Catholic University of Ireland to rival the colleges.

 
The quadrangle of the former Queen's College, Galway is dominated by a clock towerThe colleges were incorporated on December 30, 1845; and on October 30, 1849 they opened for students. [1] A Board of Queen's Colleges was created to draw up regulations for the colleges, consisting of the President and Vice-President of each college.

Academic degrees were conferred by the chancellor and senate of the university with a status similar to those of other universities of the former United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.[1]

The Queen's College at Belfast became predominantly Protestant, unlike the colleges at Cork and Galway.

Soldier F Supporter, equal Justice for all.

When will the I.R.A. pay Compensation to their Innocent Victims or Relatives.

BEAUTIFUL

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #28 on: September 11, 2006, 08:31:49 PM »
any soup????

giannineo

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Re: Exiles vs Residents
« Reply #29 on: September 11, 2006, 09:33:12 PM »
Call it irony,but I was beaten up twice in Belfast.I was born a Prod. and the first beating up was round the towpath at the lagan because I had a St. Christopher bell on my bike and was deemed to be r.c. The second time was in Sandy Row where we had been playing a B.B. Table teniis match.I was beaten up because I had a Methody jacket on and was deemed to be a snobby wee git.
      At my first job interview the chief interviewer asked me ,"How is Mehtody,it is a long time since I was there?" I answered,"as good as ever".He wasn't to know I meant it was awful.The other interviewer saw that one of my  interests on the application form was the B.B. and asked me what Company I was in .Guess what,I got the job.
               Anyway, my father was asked which class he considered himself to be. "First class in personality and that is all that matters".A great answer and one which has served me well to respond to ignorant and pretentious fools who have asked the question of me.