Author Topic: Ballygomartin Secondary: Who was always sayin' "it's no skin off my nose"?  (Read 63076 times)

our bobby

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Youse must have all been wee rascals] , I loved Ballygomartin, got thumped a few times not just by teachers, but on the whole had a good experience and believe it or not the stuff, like readin writen and rithmetic has stayed with me and helped me out over the years.

barry

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Youse must have all been wee rascals] , I loved Ballygomartin, got thumped a few times not just by teachers, but on the whole had a good experience and believe it or not the stuff, like readin writen and rithmetic has stayed with me and helped me out over the years.

  I  remember  when  you  were  on  the  TTC  Bobby,

  you  couldn't  tell  the  time, no  wonder  you  got

  the  nick  Name ------  Sharpie ------     
THAT'S  THE  WAY  I  SEE  IT, THAT'S  THE  WAY I  TELL  IT.

our bobby

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You must have followed me down Bathurst Street where a watch is not an option :D

sonofshanks

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Great stuff SOS that has put a few blanks back in place I forgot about the cloakrooms I think there used to be a tuck shop there.

Tuck shop in my day was round the corner from Harry Wilson's room. In that small corridor was a room on the left which the Caretaker opened up at break time, to sell amongst other things, Zodiac biscuits. That small corridor was also one of the exits to the back playground.  ;)
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

sonofshanks

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Thanks RR glad to be in. Harry Wilson was my year one teacher and I always thought he was dead on even if he did lift you by the locks when he kicked off. I was fortunate enough to have 2 friends in 3rd year when I first started they kept me right and sort of safe in my 1st year as I'm sure you all remember it was a tough environment for 1st years lol. They were Robert Taylor, and Stevie Millar. Robert had older brothers at the school as well ( bill and Thomas. Cupar st ) haven't seen them for years but actually saw Stevie Millar today as he is in Bangor and I'm in Ards and he called into my shop to see me.

Wee Harry Wilson was one of the better Teachers at Ballgo. He was fond of pulling you up by the locks and if you were acting the maggot he would sneak up behind you and nip you on the back of your thigh and tell you 'nip along there', also he would smoke tea leafs in his pipe. All in all not a bad spud.
From memory he suffered from a bad back and wore some kind of corset to support his back. I can see him in my minds eye, small slightly portly, wee round face with his hair parted in the middle and the collars of his shirts always seemed to be curled up.
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

Hendy

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Wee Harry Wilson was one of the better Teachers at Ballgo. He was fond of pulling you up by the locks and if you were acting the maggot he would sneak up behind you and nip you on the back of your thigh and tell you 'nip along there', also he would smoke tea leafs in his pipe. All in all not a bad spud.
From memory he suffered from a bad back and wore some kind of corset to support his back. I can see him in my minds eye, small slightly portly, wee round face with his hair parted in the middle and the collars of his shirts always seemed to be curled up.
I was in Harry's class in year one and I remember his reaction to a fight breaking out in class. Jackie Madine and Bryce Martin were scrapping on top of the desk, Harry looked up from his desk where he was marking books, he stood up calm as you like removed the drawer from his desk and emptied the contents on top of it. He then smashed it on top of the desk and took one of the sides of the drawer which was solid mahogany, went over to the brawl and trailed the first one over to his desk where he rained down the mahogany on the brawlers "dan mcdowell" (correct spelling censored)with great force then continued the motion with the second one. Great memories and RIP to the brawlers who are both in the great classroom in the sky.

river rats

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 Wonder if Harry is still around does anyone know.
We are all in the gutter but some of us are looking at the stars

Hendy

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Wonder if Harry is still around does anyone know.
I would think he would be long gone as he taught my mother as well and she is 81.

our bobby

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I had Harry Wilson as my form teacher for two years he also taught us maths, I will never forget him standing at the blackboard trying to teach us algebra and repeating over and over "CHANGE SIDES CHANGE SIGNS" it must have stuck because when I went back to college here in Canada at age 45 after a while it all came back to me and the math was no problem.

sonofshanks

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The best Teacher by a country mile in my opinion was Bill Logan. He was our Form teacher in first year. He taught us Maths, Geography and History and he was interesting to listen to. One could see he had a genuine interest in Pupils, unlike the Gestapo officers who were only interested in knocking seven bells out of most pupils.  :(
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

our bobby

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I agree, when he talked about history you were there, instilled a love in me for history and geography, still with me today

sonofshanks

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I agree, when he talked about history you were there, instilled a love in me for history and geography, still with me today

 O0 O0
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

roy beattie

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I went to the school from 1965 to 1971, it wasn't all that bad, but you did have to stand up for yourself. Had a great time playing rugby and football. We got to the final of the Secondary Schools Cup but didn't play as Anderson had a principal against Dunlampart in that shouldn't be alould to play pupls who had left at Easter. We had 3 semi-finals, 2 draws and a win but weren't allowed a moment of glory due to a teacher's indignance

sonofshanks

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I went to the school from 1965 to 1971, it wasn't all that bad, but you did have to stand up for yourself. Had a great time playing rugby and football. We got to the final of the Secondary Schools Cup but didn't play as Anderson had a principal against Dunlampart in that shouldn't be alould to play pupls who had left at Easter. We had 3 semi-finals, 2 draws and a win but weren't allowed a moment of glory due to a teacher's indignance

Hi Roy, welcome to the Forum. Think I remember you from Ballygomartin as I was there 65/69. By Anderson I take it your referring to 'Hirum Anderson', the bespectacled Celtic supporting Sadist.  ::)
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

reminiscer

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 I was at Ballygo from ’65 –’72 and would have to say that I didn’t find it an edifying experience. It was, for me, a brutalising environment peopled by a cadre teachers who didn’t ‘go big’ on professionalism or, indeed, basic humanity – Harry Wilson and several others being the exceptions. On reflection, the manifest deficiencies of the teachers could be traced to the fact that those who were recruited up to the late 60s were a generation who didn’t even need to hold a teaching qualification as long as they had a degree. This meant that many of these unfortunates appeared not to be able to decide whether they were teachers or warders and further appeared unawared that teaching was more than the transmission of facts. Trying to salvage something positive, however, I certainly learned to be strategic, not least from learning to avoid the brutal beatings and daily humiliations which characterised our existence at Ballygo. At ‘A’ level we certainly did benefit from small classes and I think we also necessarily developed levels of resilience which in other circumstances would not have occurred.