Author Topic: Winter in Belfast  (Read 6788 times)

burnsy1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 875
Winter in Belfast
« on: September 30, 2008, 06:29:27 PM »
Used to love the old winters in Belfast, those cold frosty mornins and the snow that would cover the Black Mountains.
We used to be more hardy then, playin in the streets with no coats on,  couldnt afford them and I didnt want to wear me sisters hand me downs ::) Using old socks for gloves....
Suppose it was great for us kids as we used to make slides and mess about for hours..When it snowed it was bril, the streets looked so clean  ::) ::)  for a change.
And the fog when it came, real pea soupers, couldnt see yer hand in front of yer face, and the Brits used to scare the
 sh!!te  out of ye when they appeared out of nowhere...
Cometh the hour cometh the    DUFF MAN...         OH YEAY !!!!!!!!

                                         Beers all round

teragram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10509
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2008, 07:35:01 PM »
It's like winter the night burnsy,  I'm goin' to light the fire O0
If you don't do it you won't get caught.

AL CAPONE

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12999
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2008, 07:45:33 PM »
I'm getting the oul duffel coat on in bed tonight. :)

teragram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10509
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2008, 07:48:12 PM »
Do you think it's cold as well Al?
If you don't do it you won't get caught.

Liz51

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1453
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2008, 09:30:14 PM »
 HOW DID WE ALL SURVIVE , CANT DO WITHOUT CENTREL HEATING NOW

teragram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10509
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2008, 09:42:55 PM »
Aye,  I hope we can all pay for it Rathbone.   I was just up at the Mace, and they're selling drums of Emergency Kerasone. 20 litres 30.  I was just wondering what they're expecting, using the word "Emergency"
If you don't do it you won't get caught.

giannineo

  • Guest
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2008, 10:28:45 PM »
The darkness...pubs, hotels, shops supermarkets are all highly lit these days and brighter street lights...car headlights and more of them and buses lit up...back in the 50's/60's it was really dark and the smoke from coal fires hung over the City....I remember house windows frozen/iced up...no double glazing/central heating /loft insulation.....not so many cars and people stood at bus stops freezing.....today we have insulated windproof/waterproof clothing and warm workplaces( in the main)...winters were cold and  dark. .if it snowed it went all quiet as transport went off the roads  and the snow muffled the sound of people walking on pavements...transport on the roads would slow down  and did not make the same roar....fog, which we do not get nowadays so much.

teragram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10509
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2008, 10:32:08 PM »
I'm with ye giannineo,  it's time they insulated them bus stops O0.
If you don't do it you won't get caught.

giannineo

  • Guest
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2008, 10:37:03 PM »
tera, yir right , them oul bus stops ...ye cud have a wee shelter with a Costa coffee bar inside , a station to charge yir mobile phone and a bog O0

EllCee

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18922
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2008, 10:41:42 PM »
tera, yir right , them oul bus stops ...ye cud have a wee shelter with a Costa coffee bar inside , a station to charge yir mobile phone and a bog O0

Don't forget the Trojan dispenser.

"I may not agree with you, but I respect your opinion"   "You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it"

teragram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10509
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2008, 10:42:11 PM »
I remember one time my fingers stickin' to the bus stop post because of the frost. Somebody came along with a box of swan vestas, and nearly burned the [censored] fingers off me tryin to get me free.
If you don't do it you won't get caught.

teragram

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10509
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #11 on: September 30, 2008, 10:44:15 PM »
Don't forget the Trojan dispenser.

Les,  if I'd know you were about I wouldn't have used that [censored] word [censored].
Sorry about that mate O0
If you don't do it you won't get caught.

Val

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21801
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #12 on: October 01, 2008, 12:32:12 AM »
What I always remember, it was an endurance test to go to bed. Sometimes you ended up with more clothes on to go to bed, than you had on before you started.
I hope that makes sense. :D
We couldn't afford proper water bottles going to bed, so we would fill up a lemonade bottle and wrap a cloth around it to warm your feet on. :)

My father was always up early and the fire lit for us coming down in the mornings,  of course, that's when he could get me out of bed. He always said, 'I didn't want to go to my bed at night and I didn't want to get out of it in the morning.' I think I am still the same way. :-[ 

burnsy1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 875
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #13 on: October 01, 2008, 11:37:16 AM »
Well, bedtime wasnt a problem for us, unfortunately or fortunately we slept 4 to a bed  :o.   2 up 2 down, so the winter nights in bed were warm for us.

And I,m sure the stories are true of the old coats being thrown on top of the bed to keep you warm as well. Reminds me of a Billy Connolly sketch when the priest came round for tea. The wee girl shouting in the background that her brother had his leg in the arm of the eiderdown  :2funny: :2funny:
Cometh the hour cometh the    DUFF MAN...         OH YEAY !!!!!!!!

                                         Beers all round

Chicago

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1280
Re: Winter in Belfast
« Reply #14 on: October 01, 2008, 02:50:18 PM »
I remember the winter months in Belfast as being bitter cold and damp. I really remember the cold linoleum floor in the bedroom ....we only had carpet in the livingroom...and having to wash in cold water at the kitchen sink. We had blankets, and old army coats on our bed plus a keresone fire in the room, we also slept in two big beds girls in one boys in the other. Getting to the lav was a challenge in the winter as it was outside. Mum when she could afford it had a big pot of porridge on the stove with milk and sugar, if not it was a slice of toast and butter a big cup of tea then off to school with us. Thanks goodness for school milk and hot lunches. Dad worked in the shipyard and when he was on nights he would bring home fish that he had caught off the dock and fry them up for our breakfast....hmmmm that was a treat. We walked to school with layers on and sometimes pieces of cardboard in our shoes cause of the holes, until it was our turn to get new ones. With socks falling down or held up with pieces of wool or elastic bands. I used to envy the boys as they didn't have bare legs being able to wear trousers. Our mum knitted our sweaters and made our dresses when she had the money to buy the materials. Other than that we wore hand-me-downs. Until secondary school when we all had brand new uniforms. You know I don't remember any of us kids complaining except maybe about the porridge. Of course things changed for the better when we moved to the new houses in Tullycarnet except the winter it was still bitter and cold.   O0
 
-Jen
We must all hang together, else we shall all hang separately....BENJAMIN FRANKELIN