Author Topic: Belfast Orphanages  (Read 21609 times)

glenb

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #45 on: February 18, 2009, 05:44:44 PM »
Twocoats, read the book, watched the movie, and talked to one of the McCourt brothers many times, read interviews with their old neigbors,nice man

Nothing to do with destest as you state in my opinion, the question brought up in many of these interviews was accuracy

More than one neighbor stated how nice the family was, and also that while things were poor, they were not like what was described in the movie and book

I'm not disputing what was captured as I don't know, but there is a significant amount of people that have a very different memory as depicted

glenb

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #46 on: February 18, 2009, 05:45:41 PM »
Toomebridge!!!!! great place, my own Granda was from around there (the Creagh as it's known locally), Staffordstown and Cranfield relatives there also

twocoats

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #47 on: February 18, 2009, 05:57:55 PM »
Twocoats, read the book, watched the movie, and talked to one of the McCourt brothers many times, read interviews with their old neigbors,nice man

Nothing to do with destest as you state in my opinion, the question brought up in many of these interviews was accuracy

More than one neighbor stated how nice the family was, and also that while things were poor, they were not like what was described in the movie and book

I'm not disputing what was captured as I don't know, but there is a significant amount of people that have a very different memory as depicted

No problem Glenb.

My post was just my opinion based on the book and movie and a couple of documentries.
Homophobia, racism, sexism, bigotry and sectarianism is still alive..

Kateme

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #48 on: February 18, 2009, 09:09:06 PM »
Toomebridge!!!!! great place, my own Granda was from around there (the Creagh as it's known locally), Staffordstown and Cranfield relatives there also
I think he said Tamlaghmore.
“Government’s first duty is to protect the people, not run their lives.”

irish dance

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #49 on: March 07, 2009, 11:02:43 PM »
If you read the book and watch the Movie you will see that nobody had a great opinion of the McCourts. Both in New York and in Ireland. Even the Mothers side detested the Father.

That's what makes the story real. He didn't hide anything and didn't try to say that he or his Family were anything other than what they were. He told it as he remembered it, warts and all.

Would you agree that there were thousands on family's during that time that had even less than the McCourts and brought up
their families to the best of their ability, how Frank McCourt was able to write about his mother selling her body etc., amazes me
I have friends who lived in Limerick at the same time and know that he really elaborated on lots of things except his father's
drinking.  Belfast had hard times as well, my father had to go out to work aged 11 to help rear a family of five after his father died
aged 37 and with no Widow's Pension etc., my Grandmother managed to bring them up to be good honest citizens.                     
Getting back to Belfast Orphanages my Father used to go to Nazareth Lodge once a week to visit the babies and help the nuns
feed them.  I remember the nuns going round the houses. collecting money every week for the orphanage  One in particular,
Sister Killian, asked my father the day I was born would I take the name Killian for my confirmation - which I did.


Eleanor

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #50 on: March 08, 2009, 11:07:12 AM »


Whether he was right or wrong to exaggerate his family's circumstances, it's a great read. If he'd only told the truth it might have been boring.
Hate the sin, but love the sinner

irish dance

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #51 on: March 08, 2009, 04:24:17 PM »
Whether he was right or wrong to exaggerate his family's circumstances, it's a great read. If he'd only told the truth it might have been boring.
Perhaps if Frank McCourt exaggerated about some of your ancestors in his book (which has been proven by most of the people
from Limerick whom he depicted in his book) perhaps you would not find it such a good read.

Eleanor

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #52 on: March 08, 2009, 04:59:01 PM »
Perhaps if Frank McCourt exaggerated about some of your ancestors in his book (which has been proven by most of the people
from Limerick whom he depicted in his book) perhaps you would not find it such a good read.

True!
Hate the sin, but love the sinner

abneys

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #53 on: May 20, 2014, 09:42:25 AM »
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little Children", which tells her story about life in the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Orphanage on the Ormeau Road during the 1950s and 1960s,
has just been published by Orion Books.

abneys

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Re: Belfast Orphanages Williamson house Antrim road
« Reply #54 on: May 20, 2014, 09:45:45 AM »
I am researching Williamson house Antrim road for the period the 70s/80s and would be interested  to hear from former residents and staff
Many thanks
D Corcoran

Sean T Traynor

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #55 on: October 29, 2015, 02:39:28 AM »
I have found a death entry for Mary Jane Trainor. 6th August 1922 at the St Joseph's Home mentioned. The address on the death entry states "Chichester Park" which I believe is off The Antrim Road. Another sad story of a poorly child, but at least I now know! :-([/size]
Traynor/Trainor, McDade/Daid of Carnsampson, Kirkwood of Portglenone, Nummey & McKee of The Commons, Newry.  McKee & Warnock of Armaghbrague, Jemphrey

danso

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #56 on: January 11, 2016, 01:21:37 PM »
We brought home a boy every year from the Nazareth Lodge when I was a young lad, we didn't have much but we shared, his name was Tony Bradley...I hope and pray everything went well for him in life
tony died on Saturday 9/1/16 sorry to say

Thompson

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #57 on: February 17, 2016, 10:38:47 PM »
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little Children", which tells her story about life in the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Orphanage on the Ormeau Road during the 1950s and 1960s,
has just been published by Orion Books.
I was in Williamson house in the late 1050's early 1960's I was 7/8 years old I'm please to say it was a warm and pleasant place and they could not do enough for you, we were in the boy's side and if you went to the top of the house there was a small hatch door,we used to sneak through and pretend to be ghost in the attic walking around and going " Oooooooo" . When the staff came up we scattered into our beds.
Sometimes when I first got there it was quite a lonely place, first day I arrived I was sent into the big room ( well it was a big room to me,I came from a 2 up 2 down as they call it now , I prefer " a kitchen house") any way I was waiting on the matron and I had just come from the children court , the old red one, and I could hear the radio playing Elvis Singing ' can't you see I love please don't break my heart in two' it would have brought a tear to a glass eye, the tears were running down my face thinking of my wee mums face when they took me away!!!!!!!
An other little boy was drop off and came into the room, he give me a look that would kill, (luck I saw him being dropped off and had time to wipe my eyes and nose ) it was just the tonic I needed, I was back to normal.
I have meet lots of kids I knew and ones I dint know over many years and see that lost look in there eyes which stabs me every time because I recognise it from a 100yards and they know I understand with out the violin, I was really luck some thing in me would not let them ever get inside my head and beat me.
Sorry for going on reading some of your stories lite it up in me from then .
I'm now over the last few weeks putting some things down on paper for my children and grandchildren ( as I never told my children about the 15 years, on and off I was in different homes as I though it was none of there business), I was beaten by the masters as we called them and the bigger boys but that's the way it was then ever one was the same.
All I can say and I taught my children this and many more," the ones who were in charge and harmed you in any way don't hate them , as the scum do not know you are carrying thing all your life or CARE , it will eat you up,
There was an old peom and song in the late 1960's and in it was " be gently onto thy self " .
Albert. R . Nelson. East Belfast 1952.


Thompson

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #58 on: February 18, 2016, 03:03:12 PM »
I was in Williamson house in the late 1050's early 1960's I was 7/8 years old I'm please to say it was a warm and pleasant place and they could not do enough for you, we were in the boy's side and if you went to the top of the house there was a small hatch door,we used to sneak through and pretend to be ghost in the attic walking around and going " Oooooooo" . When the staff came up we scattered into our beds.
Sometimes when I first got there it was quite a lonely place, first day I arrived I was sent into the big room ( well it was a big room to me,I came from a 2 up 2 down as they call it now , I prefer " a kitchen house") any way I was waiting on the matron and I had just come from the children court , the old red one, and I could hear the radio playing Elvis Singing ' can't you see I love please don't break my heart in two' it would have brought a tear to a glass eye, the tears were running down my face thinking of my wee mums face when they took me away!!!!!!!
An other little boy was drop off and came into the room, he give me a look that would kill, (luck I saw him being dropped off and had time to wipe my eyes and nose ) it was just the tonic I needed, I was back to normal.
I have meet lots of kids I knew and ones I dint know over many years and see that lost look in there eyes which stabs me every time because I recognise it from a 100yards and they know I understand with out the violin, I was really luck some thing in me would not let them ever get inside my head and beat me.
Sorry for going on reading some of your stories lite it up in me from then .
I'm now over the last few weeks putting some things down on paper for my children and grandchildren ( as I never told my children about the 15 years, on and off I was in different homes as I though it was none of there business), I was beaten by the masters as we called them and the bigger boys but that's the way it was then ever one was the same.
All I can say and I taught my children this and many more," the ones who were in charge and harmed you in any way don't hate them , as the scum do not know you are carrying thing all your life or CARE , it will eat you up,
There was an old peom and song in the late 1960's and in it was " be gently onto thy self " .
Albert. R . Nelson. East Belfast 1952.

misssmyth1

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Re: Belfast Orphanages
« Reply #59 on: February 21, 2016, 11:58:12 AM »
Thompson from what i read and between the lines too.  You are strong and although our experiences can either  haunt us or effect us in many ways  i believe we need to move on and although we can really never forget  them we can learn to live with them.. i am a strong believer in living for' now'  We deserve it...  So glad you are recording your memories for your family  they are important as they are a great part of what made us    US  ...