Author Topic: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War  (Read 88773 times)

RabRow

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #120 on: April 07, 2007, 03:27:09 PM »
Interesting stuff there. I know a fella from the Row named Bingham. Might be some connection there.

I PM'd a photo of David Elliott to you Acheux. Hope you received it OK

nirvana

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #121 on: April 07, 2007, 10:02:14 PM »
i have just seen this thread and it saddens me greatly that my dad had a book belonging to my grandfather who was the treasurer for his regiment. He had all the names listed with their addresses and how much dewes they paid each week.  Alas when my dad died we couldn't find this book, it has either gone to the Somme museum or has just magicallly disappeared to some visitor to the house. He covered the ormeau road i think it was the ballynafeigh district.

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #122 on: April 08, 2007, 09:47:55 AM »
i have just seen this thread and it saddens me greatly that my dad had a book belonging to my grandfather who was the treasurer for his regiment. He had all the names listed with their addresses and how much dewes they paid each week.  Alas when my dad died we couldn't find this book, it has either gone to the Somme museum or has just magicallly disappeared to some visitor to the house. He covered the ormeau road i think it was the ballynafeigh district.

Hi there Nirvana and thanks for that post - breaks my heart also as that area would have had more than it's fair share of South Belfast Volunteers, and would have provided alot of useful info - not only for myself, but the generations who will follow. I will have a word with the Somme Heritage - I know most of them up there. I'm always looking for additional material - I want to be as thorough as possible. It is my great fear of missing someone - I still occassionally come across a name that I haven't been able to positively identify. This is why I've taken 4 1/2 years so far to research this book!!! We are getting there, but anything additional is always a bonus.
Can I ask of your Grandfather's name? He may have been with the Battalion himself - I may have some info on him already - but even the fact that he was 'treasurer' for his Regiment's Old Comrades Association, all adds to the picture of this man.

I have 'lost' family items myself - taken by my unscrupulous rellies on the death of my Grandfather. Photographs of one of my Great-grandfather in uniform and his personal correspondence from the front. Up until the 1970's, my Grandfather remembered his fathers uniforms (both the grey/blue uniform of the Y.C.V. and his khaki from the trenches) in a suitcase in the attic. At some time - probably during a house move - these went missing. At least I still have his medals and his YCV swagger stick.
Also, back in the 60's we had a large, framed photograph of Sjt John Mateer, my other Great-grandfather. This was the only picture of him as he was killed in action in August 1918. The frame also contained his 36th Divisional Citation. It went missing before my time, but still breaks my heart.

Keep in touch,

Lest We Forget,

Acheux.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #123 on: April 08, 2007, 10:21:08 AM »
On this day...

1st to 7th April 1917
The whole Battalion were on working party - some by day and some by night. We found these working parties every day while in support, lasting to the 7th inst. Very heavy snow fall all the 8 days and exceedingly cold. We were relieved on the 7th at 9 p.m. by 109th Brigade. The 10th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers relieved our Company at Fort Edward and at Chateau. The 14th R.I.R. (Y.C.V's) relieved the 9th R.I.R. in the front line. We came to Wakefield Huts between Dranoutre and Locre arriving there at 11:30 p.m.

7th April 1918
Rfn James Dugan, 10/14500. Died of Wounds, France and Flanders whist serving with Divisional Entrenching Battalion, Labour Corps.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #124 on: April 08, 2007, 10:34:24 AM »
Interesting stuff there. I know a fella from the Row named Bingham. Might be some connection there.

I PM'd a photo of David Elliott to you Acheux. Hope you received it OK

Hi again RabRow,

Sorry - meant to get back to you sooner. Yep, many thanks for that photograph - is it OK to include it alongside his personal details?

Hope to be running off a couple of 'working copies' quite soon - fancy taking a look? If so, PM me and we'll arrange to get in touch.

Many thanks as always,

Acheux.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #125 on: April 08, 2007, 10:50:30 AM »
Interesting stuff there. I know a fella from the Row named Bingham. Might be some connection there.

I PM'd a photo of David Elliott to you Acheux. Hope you received it OK

Hi Rab.

Further to my last - if you can ask your friend if he has anything further on Bingham's who may have served - I would greatly appreciated it. I have a good few Bingham's - including one who won the Military Medal for Gallantry - he came from 64 Rowland Street.

All the best,

Acheux.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

nirvana

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #126 on: April 08, 2007, 11:08:30 AM »
Hi there Nirvana and thanks for that post - breaks my heart also as that area would have had more than it's fair share of South Belfast Volunteers, and would have provided alot of useful info - not only for myself, but the generations who will follow. I will have a word with the Somme Heritage - I know most of them up there. I'm always looking for additional material - I want to be as thorough as possible. It is my great fear of missing someone - I still occassionally come across a name that I haven't been able to positively identify. This is why I've taken 4 1/2 years so far to research this book!!! We are getting there, but anything additional is always a bonus.
Can I ask of your Grandfather's name? He may have been with the Battalion himself - I may have some info on him already - but even the fact that he was 'treasurer' for his Regiment's Old Comrades Association, all adds to the picture of this man.

I have 'lost' family items myself - taken by my unscrupulous rellies on the death of my Grandfather. Photographs of one of my Great-grandfather in uniform and his personal correspondence from the front. Up until the 1970's, my Grandfather remembered his fathers uniforms (both the grey/blue uniform of the Y.C.V. and his khaki from the trenches) in a suitcase in the attic. At some time - probably during a house move - these went missing. At least I still have his medals and his YCV swagger stick.
Also, back in the 60's we had a large, framed photograph of Sjt John Mateer, my other Great-grandfather. This was the only picture of him as he was killed in action in August 1918. The frame also contained his 36th Divisional Citation. It went missing before my time, but still breaks my heart.

Keep in touch,

Lest We Forget,

Acheux.

Acheux

Acheux

thnaks for replying, my grandfather was called roland Croft, the book was from war time.  It was a little A5 hard back book, either green or blue.  I know my dad took a few things to the Somme Heritage centre, but I am surprised if he took that because he knew it was of great interest to me and my brother.

RabRow

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #127 on: April 08, 2007, 11:29:00 AM »
Hi again RabRow,

Sorry - meant to get back to you sooner. Yep, many thanks for that photograph - is it OK to include it alongside his personal details?

Hope to be running off a couple of 'working copies' quite soon - fancy taking a look? If so, PM me and we'll arrange to get in touch.

Many thanks as always,

Acheux.

Glad you got it OK Acheux. Yes it s OK to use the photo. Pity I didn't have one in uniform. My other aunt might have one. But I doubt it.

The fella Bingham that I was talking to. His people came from Gaffikin Street
But could have been some connection there. I'll see what I can find out.

Aye, it would be great to see your book Acheux.  I'll PM you. Thanks again  Rab.

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #128 on: April 08, 2007, 12:41:50 PM »
Acheux

thnaks for replying, my grandfather was called roland Croft, the book was from war time.  It was a little A5 hard back book, either green or blue.  I know my dad took a few things to the Somme Heritage centre, but I am surprised if he took that because he knew it was of great interest to me and my brother.

Hi again Nirvana. Would certainly be interesting if they did have the book at the Somme Centre. Will contact them on Wednesday and see what I can find.

Don't suppose you know if the Croft's you mention lived at Rainey Street at any time. I have two recorded in my research - a Quartermaster Serjeant George H. Croft, 10/14331 and a Rifleman Ernest Croft, 10/14222 - both believed to have resided at 42 Rainey Street, South Belfast. There is possibly another brother - this cannot be verified. The only Roland Croft that I can locate would have served with the Royal Engineers - but bear in mind that the 36th (Ulster) Division did have it's own Divisonal Signal Company, R.E., which was compiled of men from the Volunteer Battalions, so he my have previously been South Belfast U.V.F.

There is another of the same name, although he served with the Cheshire Regiment.

Look forward to your reply,

Best Wishes,

Acheux.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

nirvana

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #129 on: April 08, 2007, 01:01:48 PM »
i believe Ernest and George were cousins of my grandfather.  My grandfather lived in Haypark Avenue, and Ormeau Road, I think he was resident in the ormeau road address at the time of the book.  Roland is  spelt Rowland on some of the forms, for example his marriage cert. and on the papers I got from the national archives it is Ronald.  (the army numbers matched up)

 In letters he wrote home to my gran he often referred to himself as Ron, but I know his real name was Roland. 
He was in the Royal Irish Rifles as a CSM and then the royal Irish Regiment as 2nd Lieut.  I need to check this, but I know I am not far wrong. 

 He was in the UVF, i remember the first time I found his badge, I  only about 7 at the time and didn't realise there were 2 UVF's.  ;D


acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #130 on: April 08, 2007, 01:25:04 PM »
i believe Ernest and George were cousins of my grandfather.  My grandfather lived in Haypark Avenue, and Ormeau Road, I think he was resident in the ormeau road address at the time of the book.  Roland is  spelt Rowland on some of the forms, for example his marriage cert. and on the papers I got from the national archives it is Ronald.  (the army numbers matched up)

 In letters he wrote home to my gran he often referred to himself as Ron, but I know his real name was Roland. 
He was in the Royal Irish Rifles as a CSM and then the royal Irish Regiment as 2nd Lieut.  I need to check this, but I know I am not far wrong. 

 He was in the UVF, i remember the first time I found his badge, I  only about 7 at the time and didn't realise there were 2 UVF's.  ;D


Thanks for that Nirvana - got him now!!

Funny there is no service number - will have to investigate further. Shows him initially as a Company Sergeant Major, then recieved his Warrant and became a Warrant Officer Class II. Then received his commission as a 2nd Lieutenant.

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/archiveViewFrameSetup.asp?webType=0&PageDuplicate=n%20%20%20%20%20%20%20&issueNumber=30657&pageNumber=0&SearchFor=roland%20croft&selMedalType=&selHonourType

London Gazette - 26th April 1918
"Regular Forces. The undermentioned W.O.'s, N.C.O.'s and men to be temp. 2nd Lts. 2nd Apr. 1918:- Royal Ir. Regt. - Roland Croft."

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/archiveViewFrameSetup.asp?webType=0&PageDuplicate=n%20%20%20%20%20%20%20&issueNumber=30657&pageNumber=0&SearchFor=roland%20croft&selMedalType=&selHonourType

The date of his commission would fall in nicely with the disbandment of some of the Service Battalions of the Irish Rifles, including the 8th/9th, the 11th/13th and the 10th.

Don't suppose you still have his U.V.F. badge? If so, there should be a number on the rear, prefixed with a single or a combination of letters. This will identify which Regiment of the Ulster Volunteers he served with. I collect these and the prefix for the South Belfast Volunteers is 'Cs'.

Look forward to your reply,

Best Wishes,

Acheux.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

nirvana

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #131 on: April 08, 2007, 01:29:57 PM »
i will find out for you thanks for all that info, I think my brother has the badge, he collects all manner of badges and I think when we cleared my mum and dad's house he got them all.


acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #132 on: April 08, 2007, 03:59:06 PM »
That would be great Nirvana.

If it does identify him as being South Belfast Volunteers, I can add his name and details to my roll.

Best Wishes,

Acheux.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #133 on: April 21, 2007, 07:52:27 PM »
On this day.

21st  April 1917
Cpl Joseph Glass wrote "I was discharged from 108th Field Ambulance Hospital, Bailluel and sent to the Divisional Rest Camp, 109th  Field Ambulance. I remained there until the morning of the 26th, when I left at 5.30 a.m. and entrained from Bailluel to St. Omer. Was kept in the 2nd  Army Headquarters barrack at St. Omer overnight. Left St. Omer on the 27th and trained to Lumbres. The Battalion were billeted at a small village 12 kilometers from Lumbres, where I joined them at 6 p.m. on the 27th."

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #134 on: April 29, 2007, 09:07:31 PM »
On the 26th April 1916....

Rfn William Lamont, 17/1461, died as a result of wounds received in action, aged 40 years, at the field ambulance station, Louvencourt. On the 11th May, the Belfast Telegraph relayed “the death from wounds is reported of Rifleman William Lamont, Royal Irish Rifles. Deceased, who lived at 21 Buller Street, was well known in South Belfast Orange and U.V.F. circles. He formerly worked for the Woodvale Mineral Water Company and subsequently the Inver Springs Mineral Water Company, Roden Street.“ William was the husband of Sarah Jane Lamont, of 21 Buller Street, Old Park Road. His remains were interred at Louvencourt Military Cemetery, grave 1.C.40.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t