Author Topic: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War  (Read 88775 times)

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #135 on: April 29, 2007, 09:20:34 PM »
On the 27th April 1918.

Rfn Hyam Woolf, 10/43305, died as a result of wounds, aged 28 years. He was the son of Mrs. Mina Woolf of Stoke Newington, London and the late Mr. Morris Woolf. He had formerly served as Pte H. Woolf, 7162, London Regiment. Hyam’s remains were laid to rest at Gwalia Cemetery in plot II, row F, grave number 8.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #136 on: April 30, 2007, 08:18:49 PM »
On the 28th April 1917

Cpl Joseph Glass wrote "Paraded at 8 p.m., fighting order and marched out to marked lines to practice new attack scheme. Commencing at 9 p.m. and finishing up at 1:30 p.m. The remainder of evening’s free. (During the time I was in Hospital, the Battalion moved from Wakefield Huts on the 15th and marched to Bailluel, halting there for the night of the 16th. Started again at 8 a.m. on the 17th and rested outside Hazebrouck for the night 18th. On the march at 8 a.m. for our destination village near MORINGHEM. During all the time here the whole Brigade were out practicing this new attack every day across hilly country from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.)"

28th April 1918
2nd Lieut Victor Eric Gransden, died as a result of wounds received in action, age 21 years. He was the son of Mr. Samuel Henry and Mrs. Lizzie Gransden of St. Columbs Court, Londonderry. Victor was born at Londonderry on the 5th July 1896 and was educated at Foyle College and later at First Derry Boys School. His father, Samuel, who was a contractor, signed the Ulster Covenant in 1912, giving St. Columbs Court as his residence. Victor enlisted to the ranks of the 17th (Reserve) Battalion Royal Irish Rifles on the 19th January 1916. His details are recorded at the Public Record Office under file reference WO 339/73109. Upon enlistment it is recorded that he weighed 126 lbs with a height of 5 foot 7 inches and a chest range between 32 and 34½ inches. His marital status is recorded as ‘single’. He subsequently applied for a commission and was posted to No. 7 Officer Cadet Battalion at Fermoy on the 5th October 1916. He completed his training and was discharged to a commission with the 20th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles on the 28th February 1917. At this point, his height was recorded as 5 foot 5½ inches and his weight had dropped to 110 lbs. The Belfast Telegraph of the 4th April 1917 reported that “The undermentioned appointmens of Cadets to commissions in the Reserve Battalions appear in last evening’s “Gazette.” A number of them have already been notified in our columns:- Royal Irish Rifles – Victor Gransden.” He was subsequently posted from the Reserve Battalion to the South Belfast, Volunteers, with which he served until disbandment in February 1918. He was then posted to the 2nd Battalion and it was with this regular Battalion that he fell. The Irish Times of the 4th May 1918 recorded the circumstances of Victor’s death, reporting that “Lieutenant Gransden was asleep in his dugout in the Headquarters in the outpost line, when a shell fell through the roof, and killed him instantly.” Victor’s estate was adminstered by his father, Samuel and was given a gross value of £160. Victor’s brother, William Henry Grandsden also served as an officers with the Royal Irish Rifles. The Belfast Telegraph of the 20th August 1917 reported biographical notes on William, recording “Second-Lieut. W. H. Gransden. Second-Lieut. W. H. Gransden, Royal Irish Rifles, wounded in the thigh and now in hospital in England, is the eldest son of Mr. Samuel Gransden, St. Columb’s Court, Londonderry, and the cousin of Mr. W. J. Gransden, St. Michael’s, Belfast. He was in the office of the Derry City Council before the war, and has been at the front since April, 1916.”  His brother Victor is also an officer in the Rifles. An additional report in the same edition recorded William as ‘wounded’. Victor’s remains were laid to rest at Minty Farm Cemetery, Langemark-Poelkapelle, West-Vlaanderen, in plot III, row A, grave number 3. His headstone inscription simply reads ‘Victory’.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #137 on: May 05, 2007, 12:40:00 PM »
On the....

29th April 1917
Sunday Church parade at 10 a.m. Sports in the afternoon.

29th April 1918
Lieut Frederick Homer Lewis, is reported as having been killed in action, aged 24 years, whilst attached to the 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. He was the son of Mr. Frederick William and Mrs. Lizzie Blanche Lewis of 41 Shore Road, Belfast. Frederick’s remains were never found and he is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, panels 139 to 140 and 162 and 162a and panel 163a. Frederick had been born on the 22nd May 1894 at Belfast. His father was an insurance agent and his mother was the sub-postmistress of Skegoniel G.P.O. He was educated at the Belfast Royal Acadamy had latterly found employment as an insurance inspector.  He had joined Queen’s University O.T.C. on the 9th October 1916 and was then attested in Belfast on the 21st October, that year. Upon attestation, he was posted to the Army Reserve. A testimonial from his Officer Commanding was ‘very good’. He applied for a commission on the 12th December 1916, expressing a preference for service with the Motor Machine Gun Corps. At the accompanying medical, Frederick is recorded as having been 6 foot 2 inches, weighing 162 lbs, with a chest range from 35½ to 38 inches. He was mobilized on the 27th February 1917 and posted to No. 2 Machine Gun Corps Cadet Battalion at Pirbright, joining the Battalion on the 1st March 1917. Subsequent records show that Frederick was “found unsuitable to Maching Gun Corps and therefore transferred to No. 9 Officer Cadet Battalion, Gailes on the 7th June 1917”. He was re-attested at Ayre on the 10th August 1917 to the 19th (Reserve) Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles, and given the service number 19/1027. On the 28th August 1917 he is shown to be ‘General Service’, attached from the 9th Officer Cadet Battalion, upon commission, to the 19th Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles. He subsequently served in the line with the South Belfast Volunteers, transferring to the 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles on the 2nd April 1918, following the dibandment of the 10th Rifles. Frederick fell with the 1st Battalion on the 29th April 1918 whilst the 107th Infantry Brigade was tasked with the retaking of Canopus Trench, which had fallen the previous evening. Frederick’s personal effects are recorded as having been returned to his father at St. Vincents Terrace, Shore Road, Belfast. His details are recorded as the Public Records Office under file reference WO 339/83081 164825. He is remembered on the Queen’s University, Belfast, Roll of Honour “Lewis, Frederic Homer, Second-Lieutenant, Royal Irish Rifles, member of the Training Corps 1916-1917. 29th April 1918”.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #138 on: May 05, 2007, 01:50:38 PM »
On the....

30th April 1917
Left village near Moringhem. Marched to Arques, 13 kilometers. Weather is very fine.
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #139 on: May 05, 2007, 01:52:58 PM »
On the...

1st to 8th May 1916
In rest billets at Lealvillers.

1st May 1917
Arques. Reveille at 5 a.m. Breakfast 6:30 a.m. On parade at 7:30 a.m. Fell out awaiting motor lorry wagons to convey us to an unknown destination. We left Arques at 9:30 a.m., travelling via Hazebrouck, Bailluel and arriving at Locre about 1:30 p.m. This being the wrong place we came back again and arrived at right place, a small canvas camp, about 2 kilometers outside Bailluel 3:30 p.m.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #140 on: May 05, 2007, 01:54:54 PM »
On the...

2nd May 1916
In rest billets at Lealvillers.

2nd May 1917
Reveille 5:30 a.m. Breakfast 6 a.m. "C" Company - 110 men, 3 Serjeants. “D” Company – same. "A" - 80 men for working party at new railway, Lindenhock Corner. Marched off at 6:45 a.m. to report at 8 a.m. to an officer of the R.E.'s. Returning to camp at 5 p.m.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #141 on: May 05, 2007, 01:57:22 PM »
On the...

3rd May 1916
In rest billets at Lealvillers.
Roll call at 7:45 a.m. Company Drill from 9:30 till 10:30 a.m. From 10:30 a.m. till 12:30, bayonet fighting. Afternoon, practice over area in extended order.

3rd  May 1917
Working parties the same on the 2nd.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #142 on: May 05, 2007, 02:00:08 PM »
On the...

4th May 1916
In rest billets at Lealvillers.
Brigade advancing in extended order over marked area from 8:45 till 12:30 noon. Afternoon - Final of Bayonet Competition.
1st Platoon, A Company
1st Platoon, B Company
1st Platoon, C Company
1st Platoon, D Company
Result – B -1st, D -2nd, C - 3rd.

4th  May 1917
Working parties the same as previous day.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #143 on: May 05, 2007, 02:06:45 PM »
On this day....

5th May 1916
In rest billets at Lealvillers.
Advancing over same area from 9:30 a.m. till 11 a.m. Company Drill in extended order till 12:15 noon. Company's parade at 3:15 p.m. marching order for Colonel's inspection. From 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Bayonet fighting under Lieut Stevenson and Company Commander. Pay at 7 p.m. Drunk at 8 p.m.

5th May 1917
Rfn James Houston, 20/5, reported as having been killed in action on this date, aged 21 years. He was the son of Mr. John and Mrs. Mary Houston, of Bovennett, Loughbrickland, Banbridge, County Down. Upon enlistment at Banbridge, he gave his place of birth as Aghaderg, County Down, and he is recorded as having signed the Ulster Covenant in 1912 at Bovennet, Loughbrickland. John’s remains were intrerred at St. Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery in plot II, row B, grave number 5.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #144 on: May 06, 2007, 11:22:34 AM »
On this day.

5th May 1914

Belfast Weekly Telegraph, Saturday, May 9, 1914, reported the wedding of Captain Holt Waring, a Battalion Commander with the South Belfast Volunteers. The report read:
"WELCOME TO CAPTAIN AND MRS. WARING.

JOYUS HOMECOMING.

CO. DOWN VILLAGE EN FETE.

NORTH IRISH HORSE AS ESCORT.

The picturesque little  village of Waringstown was en fete on Tuesday in honour of the joyous occasion when Captain Holt Waring, D.L., returned to the ancestral seat of the family accompanied by his bride, nee Miss Margaret Parr, daughter of Mr. John Charlton Parr, D.L., of Staunton park, Herefordshire, to whom he was wedded last week. Never was there a brighter or more festive homecoming, and the spontaneity of the great demonstration of welcome which awaited the gallant Captain and his fair partner, into which nothing that was merely artificial or conventional entered, must have been genuinely touching to the happy couple upon whom the well-wishers of the entire village and countryside community where showered. The happy couple left London on Monday evening, travelling via Belfast, whence the journey to the historic home of the Warings was completed by motor. Lurgan provided a foretaste of the welcome which Waringstown was to display in lavish and whole-hearted fashion. At church place the Waringstown troop of a squadron of the North Irish Horse, which is commanded by the Captain, were drawn up under Sergeant-Major Blakeley, and made a glittering, imposing escort to the motor car, which reached that point at 10.30. a triumphal procession. Mr. Hugh Hayes and Mr. David Pedlow having extended a cordial welcome on behalf of the townspeople to captain and Mrs. Waring, the yeomanry wheeled into escort order and moved off on the closing stages of the journey, which are best described as in the nature of a triumphant procession. The inhabitants of town and country took occasion by the hand and imparted a distinct note of gaiety to the route, and with nature wearing the brightest garb of a glorious may morning nothing was out of harmony with the festive character of the happy occasion. If royalty itself had been coming to Waringstown the demonstration of welcome could not have been more cordial. Every point was prominently beflagged. Union jacks fluttered from every house and farmstead. The village from end to end was festooned with bunting, whose long lines were interspersed here and there with artistic archings in which were emblazoned in large letters of vivid colouring the one word that gave the keynote to the entire demonstration, “welcome.”
On the outskirts of the village, where the Waringstown flute band was stationed, the occupants of the motor car alighted and made their way to the gates at their residence arm-in-arm, smiling in acknowledgement of the hearty greetings that came from all sides. The band struck up a lively air as the popular captain and his bride passed along. Under the command of Mr. James Pennington the men of F. Company, Waringstown 2nd Battalion West Down Regiment U.V.F., with which Captain Waring is prominently associated as commander, lined each side of the village and came to the salute. The gentle slope leading to the gates provided what was perhaps the most picturesque spectacle, where all was colour, gaiety, and motion. The school children, with the little girls in pretty white frocks, and all bearing miniature union jacks, which they waved with the enthusiasm that juveniles alone can command, made as pretty a picture as the eye could rest upon. At the gates leading to the house a representative committee, including Ven. E. D. Atkinson, LL.B., the archdeacon of Dromore, had assembled. Here the bridegroom and his bride halted while Mr. H. Hayes read an address of cordial welcome, which voiced the sentiments of the entire gathering. Miss Maggie Kennedy, one of the school children, then stepped forward and presented Mrs. Waring with a choice bouquet, which she smilingly accepted. Then Captain Waring, who was received with ringing cheers, voiced the gratitude and thanks of his partner and himself for the address and the truly characteristic welcome to them on the auspicious occasion chosen for exhibiting a lifelong friendship.
AT THE ANCESTRAL HOME.
The Captain and his bride then passed under the decorated archway to the ancestral home followed by the yeomanry and the Volunteers. It may be recalled that this fine old residence was built my Mr. William Waring, a member of the family, who had come over from England in the time of King James, and was then settled at Toomebridge. Mr. Waring when the times quieted down built the mansion on his property, around which gathered the village now known as Waringstown. The church was built by him in 1681, at first as a chapel for himself and his tenants, but after the ancient church of the parish had been destroyed in the wars of the revolution it was constituted the parish church of Donaghcloney. Mr. William Waring’s eldest son Samuel was a man of considerable mark in his day. He represented the borough of Hillsborough in parliament, and in the course of his travels on the continent observing the prosperity occasioned by the linen-weaving industry in the law colonies, brought over a colony of diaper weavers from Flanders and settled them in his own native village, thus laying the foundation of the damask-weaving industry for which Waringstown has been so long famed. Captain Waring briefly address the North Irish Horse and Volunteers in the mansion grounds, the men cheering heartily at the close. The day celebrations then terminated. Last night there was a great display in the village and grounds, which were illuminated with lights and bonfires, and there was a big turnout of the Volunteers."

6th May 1916
In rest billets at Lealvillers.
Battalion paraded at 9:15 a.m. Marching orders for a short route march about 3 miles afternoon kit inspection.

6th May 1917 (Sunday)
Cpl Joseph Glass wrote - Divine Service for all. Passes were granted to anyone wishing to go to any of the villages or towns convenient to Camp, from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. I and two Serjeants, Shaw J.C. and Bate Wm., and Cpl Gibson went to Bailluel, and spent a most pleasant afternoon and got back to camp at various hours. (The remnant of Battalion and Headquarters are billeted between Bailluel and Meteren).

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #145 on: May 06, 2007, 10:38:43 PM »
Hi again Melv and thank-you for your reply.

I am sure that 9/12606, Cpl William Bell, 9th (Service) Battalion (West Belfast Volunteers) would have known young Jeremiah Mabin. When the Ulster Division was formed, the old structure of the Ulster Volunteers was adjusted slightly, so men that had drilled together as part of the Volunteer Force, served alongside each other in the same sections, platoons, companies and battalions.
I'm sure that Margaret and George Mabin would have called with Abraham and Charlotte to offer condolence, just months before their own son's were reported as 'missing, presumed dead'.
I am looking into the date of William's death to see if I can establish any particular action on that date - the Battalion wasn't long in the line at that point and I think they suffered their first enemy bombardment, quiet heavy I believe, around that time.

If I find anything further, will certainly let you know.

Best Wishes,

Acheux.


Hi again Melv. Haven't forgotten about William Bell.

On the date he died, 8th March 1916, the 107th Infantry Brigade, of which the 9th (Service) Battalion (West Belfast Volunteers) was part, was employed in the line at the South Sector fo the Ancre, known otherwise as Thiepval Wood. This was the worst of the two sectors - the other being Hamel. The wood was subject to frequent and indiscriminated shelling during this time, the bombardment turning the area into 'a very unpleasant spot indeed'. The Brigade suffered numerous casualties during this time, with 9/12606, Cpl William Bell, being one of them. William's remains were interred at Bertrancourt Military Cemetery, plot 1, row A, grave number 7. There is no record of any other deaths with the Battalion on that date, however a 17/1032, Rfn Samuel Cassells, 10th (Service) Battalion (South Belfast Volunteers), was killed the following week when shot through the head. He was interred in the row behind William. Samuel came from the Donegall Road.

Lest we forget.

Acheux.

 
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

Tom Bombadil

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #146 on: June 19, 2007, 02:04:06 PM »
Quote
South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War

South Belfast

Lord of the Rings

Seriously?

 ;D

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #147 on: June 19, 2007, 11:53:23 PM »
South Belfast

Lord of the Rings

Seriously?

 ;D

Tom Bumbandit.

Get off my thread.

Many of these brave men gave their lives for freedom of expression for idiots like you. You owe them a debt of gratitude and an apology to the families of the men, a great many of whom subscribe to this site.

Glib comment like yours aren't appreciated - so stay off my thread. >:( >:(

Acheux.

We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

twocoats

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #148 on: June 20, 2007, 01:31:29 AM »
Tom Bumbandit.

Get off my thread.

Many of these brave men gave their lives for freedom of expression for idiots like you. You owe them a debt of gratitude and an apology to the families of the men, a great many of whom subscribe to this site.

Glib comment like yours aren't appreciated - so stay off my thread. >:( >:(

Acheux.


Well said Rifleman. Coats
Homophobia, racism, sexism, bigotry and sectarianism is still alive..

twocoats

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #149 on: June 24, 2007, 05:00:52 PM »
Hi Acheux,
Just had a glance at this Post. As you know members have had various debates on People who have emigrated and those who still live in Belfast.

What struck a Chord with me is that here we have people who left N. Ireland for a life in the Colonies and they are signing up to go back to Europe to fight a war.

What brave men they were.

Again I thank you for the work you did for me on the history of my Grandfather. I don't know wether I related the story of how he met his brother while in the forces.

After he signed up in East Antrim he was in Larne, From Glenarm, getting processed to go to France. A ship full of New Zealand Troops steamed into Larne and of course everyone got together.

Someone mentioned to my Grandfather that the was a Black in the NZ group who was originally from Glenarm.

Guess who.

His brother was much older than him and had emigrated to NZ when he was just a boy.

The both of them got to see their Mother before they were both shipped out. Thankfully they both survived the Great War.

My Grandfather was killed in the 2nd World war when his ship was sunk by German Bombers off Co. Waterford. in 1941.

I shall be in Ireland in July and will be visiting Dungarvan Waterford where divers found the wreck in 1995.

Coats
Homophobia, racism, sexism, bigotry and sectarianism is still alive..