Author Topic: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War  (Read 88772 times)

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #285 on: August 14, 2013, 05:36:45 PM »
Hi there Rolohosick and so sorry for not getting back earlier, but have been of the Forum for a while!!
 
 Did you get sorted with Samuel's details?
 
 Born Belfast, 15th January 1866.
 Enlisted to the Royal Engineers at Belfast in November, 1893. Born at Shankill, Belfast and age upon enlistment given as 23 years 10 months. His occupation at the time was given as 'Fitter' and it was noted that he was serving in the Royal Artillery (Antrim) Militia. He was attested as Sapper Samuel Hosick, 27800.
 His next of kin details recorded his father as John Hosick of of 29, Balmoral Street, Belfast (subsequently amended to 70 Percy Street). His brother, Henry is recorded but subsequently struck through. Sisters by the names of Jane and Annie are also recorded.
 His Medical Report describes him as being 5 feet 8 1/4 inches in height with a weight of 139 pounds and a chest of 54 1/2 inches. His complexion was fresh, his eyes grey and his hair light brown. He had a scar on the front of his chest and 'dots' tattooed on each hand between the thumb and forefinger. His religion was recorded as 'Church of England'.
 Three days after attestation, Samuel joined his Regiment at Chatham, serving with 17th Company, Royal Engineers.
 On the 28th October 1898, a Court of Enquiry was convened at Aldershot to investigate the circumstances connected with "Injuries received by No. 27800 Sapper S. Hosick, 17th Co. R.E."
 Samuel gave evidence, stating "to escape the front wheel I stepped back a little and the back wheel went over my left foot. I went to my barrack room & the next morning, as I could not walk, I went to hospital."
 The outcome of the Enquire stated "Accident on duty - not likely to intefere with his future efficiency as a soldier. I recommend the remission of half of stoppages."
 Samuel also suffered a 'sprained ankle' and a 'hernia' whilst in the Army.
 He had a couple of 'minor' offences for which he was Confined to Barracks for firstly two days and then eight days. He was charged also with being 'drunk in uniform' but this was 'admonished'.
 He completed a Military Workshop at Chatham in December 1893 where he qualified as a 'Skilled Fitter'. He progressed through further Army courses to become a 'Superior Fitter'.
 On the 13th November 1899, Samuel joined F Company, Royal Engineers at Aldershot.
 On the 21st November 1899, Samuel was awareded his second Good Conduct badge and pay.
 He then returned to G Company at Chatham and is recorded in Kent in 1902.
 In 1902, Samuel transferred to the Army Reserve 'on expiration of his period of Army Service'.  On the 9th September 1902, he was granted Gratuity for War Service in South Africa.
 On the 7th July 1902, Samuel was Discharged to the Army Reserve. He was in receipt of two Good Conduct badges and his conduct was described as being 'Good'. 
 He was noted as 'Absentee' from the 1st Class Army Reserve on the 4th May 1905.
 A Certificate of Absence was raised, noting that Samuel had not presented himself during either June or September 1905. This Certificate notes Samuel's address as 155 Argyll Street, Belfast. [/font][/color]
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

acheux_rifleman

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #286 on: August 14, 2013, 05:37:35 PM »
great stuff Achuexrifleman i have done abit my self on my faimly but one i diden get a lot on was Samual Hosick who was in the Antrim Artilary in 1890 if you have any infro of his and the reg   would be thankfull,

Just posted some info on Samuel. Sorry it's taken so long!!
We are the Pilgrims, master; we shall go
Always a little further - it may be
Beyond the last blue mountain barred with snow,
Across that angry or t

anamcara01

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #287 on: August 15, 2013, 04:26:15 PM »
I am interested in Nationalists from South Belfast (primary from the Market area of Belfast) who went to fight in the 1st World War does any one have any old photos and perhaps a history of such men??? I am involved in some research on the matter and would appreciate any information relating to this

my grandfather went to sign up for service , with 10 other men , he was rejected because of flat feet . none of his friends came back, the widows quickly remarried as if not they would have starved.
Truth in our hearts. Strength in our hands. Consistency in our tongues

anamcara01

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #288 on: August 15, 2013, 04:29:27 PM »
you will get information from central library  in the papers dated for the time as if I remember reading years ago the names and addresses in casualty lists , also st malachys might have a list of these men killed in action as well. its long shot but ask jimmy mcstravick
Truth in our hearts. Strength in our hands. Consistency in our tongues

anamcara01

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #289 on: August 15, 2013, 04:32:26 PM »
Truth in our hearts. Strength in our hands. Consistency in our tongues

anamcara01

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #290 on: August 15, 2013, 05:02:50 PM »
joseph adams keegan street
p Bradley stanfield court
t crumpton mcauley street
 
d culen Henrietta street
 
g Doherty Cormac square
s hanna eliza street
 
w hill ormeau avenue 
 
p keenan sussex place
p McBride stanfield street
 
 
 
 
 
Truth in our hearts. Strength in our hands. Consistency in our tongues

Wife of a Sandy Row Boy

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #291 on: March 21, 2014, 08:05:36 AM »
My husband is a descendant of Thomas Minnis husband of Jane Forbes and I think he served in the Royal Irish Fusilleers like his son William Forbes Minnis husband of Essie Ann.  They originate from the Banbridge area and survived the war.  It would be nice to know which battles they fought if you have any information.  Not sure if any other family members also served.  Would you be able to find out please?  Many thanks.  There was a brother Thomas Minnis I think as well.

Snuggs

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #292 on: March 24, 2014, 12:35:52 PM »


Dear Acheux,

You have done a fantastic job with your research and have shown so much dedication in allowing us to rememberi those that gave their lives for us.  Well Done.  I would certainly love to buy your book when it is available by post.

My grandfather was Hugh Crowe 64515 (formerly 4348) Pioneer Hugh Crowe - Royal Engineers. Hugh enlisted into the reserve division of the militia in April 1904. He was promoted to Bombardier in 1906, Corporal in 1907.  He joined the Special reserve and was posted to the Antrim Royal Garrison Artillery and was later discharged on the 7th April 1910.  He enlisted into the Royal Irish Rifles Army Reserve in September 1914 and was transferred to the Royal Engineers in February 1915.  On the same day he was posted to the 36th Division Signalling Division.  His service with the Colours 8.4.04 to 7.4.10 and 8.9.14 - 10.3.19. Overseas service BEF France 15.2.15 - 20.2.19.  He was discharged on the 10.3.1919 - ceasing to fulfil Army requirements. What it doesn't tell you was that he was shot in the leg and arm. On returning home, he was eventually housed thanks to the Irish Sailors and Land Trust at Earl Haig Park.  Later he had both legs amputated and he spent his last days at the Craigavon UVF Hospital, where he eventually died in 1954. 
[size=78%]

[size=78%]We have few photographs of him but we do have one of him inn a wheelchair meeting Mrs. W M Wright, chairman of the [/size]Coronation[size=78%] Reunion Committee and Secretary of the Not Forgotten Association and Lady Enniskillen, president of the Committee.  MY only memory from childhood was a painting or photograph hanging on the wall of their home with his in uniform and on horseback.[/size]
[size=78%]
[/size]
Thank you for your dedication on this project.

Lest we forget.

Snuggs


leafy

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #293 on: April 08, 2014, 02:42:39 PM »
Hi rifleman
My grandfather was in the ulster rifles during ww2 , but I think he was in the irish rifles towards the end of ww1 his name was john sinclair and I know he was wounded in one of those wars.
I'm trying to get service records or any info to help my search, so I hope you can check your records for me.
 Also good luck with the book,very important to remember their sacrifice.

andy

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #294 on: April 08, 2014, 08:20:45 PM »
Hi all.

I am currently writing a book and compiling a nominal roll of all the men who either served with the South Belfast Regiment of the Ulster Volunteer Force, or the 10th (Service) Battalion (South Belfast Volunteers), Royal Irish Rifles, who fought in the Great War as part of the 107th Brigade of the 36th (Ulster) Division.

Their recruitment area covered Lisburn Road up to Balmoral, Fountainville, Sandy Row, Donegall Road, Ormeau Road, Donegall Pass, Great Victoria Street, Broadway, Malone - although men did come into the Battalion from all over Ireland.
HI ACHEUX,  good to hear from you again hope yoy got all the info I sent you about my dad [ Robert Anderson m.m.] off the royal irish rifles a member off the the south Belfast regiment U.V,F.
    YOURS BILL ANDERSON.

I have over 1400 names (original Battalion members plus alot of Englishmen who came over to the Battalion following the massacre at the Somme), with alot of photos and biographical notes.

This labour of love has taken over 4 years so far and I hope to publish next year. I don't want to miss any men out, so am after any recollections, photos, documents etc - either for loan, to have a look at or a copy of, or to buy (although would rather items stayed with the families - but end of the day, better off with an enthusiast than in the back of a drawer!!)

Both my Great Grandfathers served with this Battalion - only one came back.

The main reason I am compiling this roll is to preserve the memory of the men who fought, endured, suffered and made the ultimate sacrifice in the 3 years the Battalion existed. Most of their service records were destroyed during WW2 when the records office was hit by an incendiary bomb during an air raid, so no archive exists.

If you have anything at all, or even if you are unsure of your relatives service, feel free to get in touch and I'll do a quick check.

Many thanks for having a look at my first post!!

Lest We Forget....

Acheux Rifleman.
yy u r yy u b i c u r yy 4 me

Hendy

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #295 on: April 11, 2014, 08:42:26 AM »
Hi rifleman
My grandfather was in the ulster rifles during ww2 , but I think he was in the irish rifles towards the end of ww1 his name was john sinclair and I know he was wounded in one of those wars.
I'm trying to get service records or any info to help my search, so I hope you can check your records for me.
 Also good luck with the book,very important to remember their sacrifice.
Leafy try these sites;

http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/category.aspx?cat=39

Ancestry hold a vast amount of Service and Pension records but as rifleman stated a lot were destroyed by bombing in WW2, you can do a free search for names but there is a subcription for viewing, you can also download the documents. They contain the same type of info that rifleman gave to RoloHosick.

http://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/

On the Government site you can obtain your own Service records for free or a deceased NOK's records for a fee of 30. There are guidelines who is entitled to download. These are Service and medical records from 1920 until present and are not for general public access but only to entitled relatives and made available under the Data Protection Act.

leafy

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #296 on: April 11, 2014, 01:04:41 PM »
Very much appreciated hendy

deirdre

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #297 on: April 13, 2014, 04:37:59 PM »
Hi all.

I am currently writing a book and compiling a nominal roll of all the men who either served with the South Belfast Regiment of the Ulster Volunteer Force, or the 10th (Service) Battalion (South Belfast Volunteers), Royal Irish Rifles, who fought in the Great War as part of the 107th Brigade of the 36th (Ulster) Division.

Their recruitment area covered Lisburn Road up to Balmoral, Fountainville, Sandy Row, Donegall Road, Ormeau Road, Donegall Pass, Great Victoria Street, Broadway, Malone - although men did come into the Battalion from all over Ireland.

I have over 1400 names (original Battalion members plus alot of Englishmen who came over to the Battalion following the massacre at the Somme), with alot of photos and biographical notes.

This labour of love has taken over 4 years so far and I hope to publish next year. I don't want to miss any men out, so am after any recollections, photos, documents etc - either for loan, to have a look at or a copy of, or to buy (although would rather items stayed with the families - but end of the day, better off with an enthusiast than in the back of a drawer!!)

Both my Great Grandfathers served with this Battalion - only one came back.

The main reason I am compiling this roll is to preserve the memory of the men who fought, endured, suffered and made the ultimate sacrifice in the 3 years the Battalion existed. Most of their service records were destroyed during WW2 when the records office was hit by an incendiary bomb during an air raid, so no archive exists.

If you have anything at all, or even if you are unsure of your relatives service, feel free to get in touch and I'll do a quick check.

Many thanks for having a look at my first post!!

Lest We Forget....

Acheux Rifleman.....how do I share my great uncle's details with you...he was a member of ycv,Uvf the royal Irish rifles...I have all his details here if you want them...I tried to send them in a PM..but was unable to do so...also my cousin has written a play about him and the Great War ,which will be on in queens uni..in May...dee

deirdre

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #298 on: April 25, 2014, 02:49:23 PM »
THE STORY OF 4 SPRINGFIELD RD MEN AND THEIR PART IN WW1...my great uncle rifleman  Willy Kerr...R.I.R, and his friends.

Gary.k

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Re: South Belfast Volunteers in the Great War
« Reply #299 on: November 25, 2015, 01:22:35 AM »
Hi
I am looking to see if anyone can help me get a photo of my great great uncle it is for a mural in the area I have a photo of James brother Robert who also died at the Somme he was with the South Belfast Volunteers.
I if anyone can help I would really appreciate it

Private James Dickson Royal Welsh Fusiliers from Sandy row DICKSON, JAMES

Rank:
    Private
Service No:
    72877
Date of Death:
    31/07/1917
Age:
    19
Regiment/Service:
    Royal Welsh Fusiliers
 
    13th Bn.
Grave Reference:
    B. 31.
Cemetery:
    DRAGOON CAMP CEMETERY
Additional Information:
    Son of Robert and Sarah J. Dickson, of 92 and 94, Sandy Row, Belfast.