Author Topic: James Mackie & Sons  (Read 1037428 times)

wes

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6150 on: July 10, 2016, 04:56:06 PM »
Hi all
My wonderful Dad worked all his life in Mackies
He was an intelligent and kind gentleman
Robert Lloyd Brown known as
Bobby Brown
He was a Machinist at Albert foundry from 1927 - 1974
He died suddenly at the age of 60 years in 1974
He was my hero and friend
Might there be someone out there who remembers Dad ?

Idarachel

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6151 on: August 03, 2016, 05:58:47 PM »

hi Alex Harry Irvine lives outside Melbourne I think I still have his email if I can find I will send it to you

unity1

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6152 on: September 05, 2016, 11:08:20 PM »
I served my time as a patternmaker in Mackies and as a 16 year old protestant from the Shankill my journeyman was a man called Tommy Orr a catholic from Cavendish Street off the Falls. Well Tommy looked after me during my apprenticeship and a finer man you could not meet, never in all the years we worked together was there one word or fallout over religion. A true gentleman and someone I will never forget.
I Worked in Mackies at the onset of the troubles in the" outside orders department" I continued to work there but was sent to Coventry by the department of around 100 men The Union Rep refused to accept my union subs, I had to go to Townends Street To pay my subs. I was transferred to another department where the final straw was a mock up bomb put in my Kit bag, I then thought it was time to leave

our bobby

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6153 on: September 08, 2016, 04:29:19 PM »
I don't know if there is anyone left who would remember my Uncle Sammy Killow,  he started in Mackies on March 12, 1939, as an Apprentice Fitter in Engineers No.2 Department. On 28th October, 1946 he was transferred to Turning No.3 Department as a Fitter, and on 23rd May, 1966 he was promoted to the position of Foreman in the Ball Bearing Assembly Department where he worked until he came to Canada in 1973.

Sammy passed away on August 13th ,2016. he was 93 years old. 

The Killow Family of 5 brothers came originally from Cupar Street , so not surprising 4 of the brothers worked in Mackies ,  Jackie and Tom were fitters and Charlie was a truck driver, the oldest brother escaped to the Royal Air Force.

When he Married my Dads sister he moved to Crimea Street , They later bought a house in Duffield Park, where they lived before emigrating to Canada.  (My Dad Artie Glencross was  another Mackies worker BK1 as was I, Sliver Spinning then Toolroom.

Sammy loved to reminisce about happenings in Mackies over the years, and lucky enough I was able to relate to a lot of the names and events.

HKT

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6154 on: November 16, 2016, 05:39:27 PM »
Hi all, my grandad built a jute mill in Burma in the 1950's, still standing to this day with all the wonderful ancient jute machinery in place!
Wonder if anyone might have been part of the team that came out to Burma back then and may have taken some old photos inside the factory they could share? Would be much appreciated if you could share! Thank you

JackM

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6155 on: November 19, 2016, 01:33:04 PM »
Hi all, my grandad built a jute mill in Burma in the 1950's, still standing to this day with all the wonderful ancient jute machinery in place!
Wonder if anyone might have been part of the team that came out to Burma back then and may have taken some old photos inside the factory they could share? Would be much appreciated if you could share! Thank you

There are still quite a few mills around the world with old Mackie machinery still running. That was part of the problem, the machinery lasted too long. Textile machinery in general is of simple design, basic engineering and if maintained correctly, should last a couple of lifetimes. I am aware of a mill in Bolivia which still has working Mackie machinery, built in the early 1930`s. Unfortunately the scene for textiles changed dramatically in the UK & Europe and indeed the world, which spelt the end of the line for companies like Mackie's.
I would say anyone involved in the Burma jute mill you describe, would now be a ripe old age.  :) :)
Justice for the Massacred of La Mon and other atrocities.  The TRUTH will set them FREE.
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hathaway

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6156 on: November 24, 2016, 02:35:58 PM »
Was in Newtownabbey Council Offices last week which is the old Henry Campbell Thread Mill and on show in the Museum is an old Mackie frame as fresh as the day it was made, Worth a look to ex Mackie employees.

harrydunn

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6157 on: November 25, 2016, 01:34:59 PM »
Was in Newtownabbey Council Offices last week which is the old Henry Campbell Thread Mill and on show in the Museum is an old Mackie frame as fresh as the day it was made, Worth a look to ex Mackie employees.

I have some photos of the Museum in the mill including the frame posted on the forum.

Mulster

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6158 on: November 26, 2016, 03:16:07 PM »

I don,t  remember the troughs but I do recall the ****house guard he would sit with his hand on the toilet roll and only release three sheets of paper . His reasoning " ONE UP ONE DOWN AND ONE ACROSS."He wrote down your check number and when he figured your time was up he would bang on the cubicle and call out  "your time is up get back to work"
i remember them well was an apprentice in the late sixties...

W432

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6159 on: November 27, 2016, 11:06:49 AM »
Hi all, my grandad built a jute mill in Burma in the 1950's, still standing to this day with all the wonderful ancient jute machinery in place!
Wonder if anyone might have been part of the team that came out to Burma back then and may have taken some old photos inside the factory they could share? Would be much appreciated if you could share! Thank you
Hi HKT, Havn't got any photographs to share with you but thought the following would be of interest. According to Stanley Jebb in his book "One Among Many" Mackie installed a total of three jute mills in Burma. Negotiations for the first mill were completed in 1955, the machinery shipped in 1956 and installed in 1956/57. Commissioned by Arthur Larkin the mill had 500 looms for the production of jute sacks for agricultural products mainly rice. No dates are stated for the other two mills except to say that they were completed sometime after 1967. He goes on to say that even if Mackie still existed, there would be little or no further business for them  coming out of Burma as the three mills were running badly and the few spare parts and other equipment required were being sourced from India or China. He mentions three outside erectors involved with the installation of the machinery in Burma namely John McCready, Roy Gilchrist and raymond Purdy. The book was published in 2009 and i heard that sadly Stanley had passed away in 2014.

JackM

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6160 on: December 05, 2016, 06:58:46 PM »
Hi HKT, Havn't got any photographs to share with you but thought the following would be of interest. According to Stanley Jebb in his book "One Among Many" Mackie installed a total of three jute mills in Burma. Negotiations for the first mill were completed in 1955, the machinery shipped in 1956 and installed in 1956/57. Commissioned by Arthur Larkin the mill had 500 looms for the production of jute sacks for agricultural products mainly rice. No dates are stated for the other two mills except to say that they were completed sometime after 1967. He goes on to say that even if Mackie still existed, there would be little or no further business for them  coming out of Burma as the three mills were running badly and the few spare parts and other equipment required were being sourced from India or China. He mentions three outside erectors involved with the installation of the machinery in Burma namely John McCready, Roy Gilchrist and raymond Purdy. The book was published in 2009 and i heard that sadly Stanley had passed away in 2014.

Made a few enquires from some friends in the Far East. Mackies installed a Jute mill in Burma in 1956. A second Jute mill installed by McCready, Gilchrist & Purdy ( sounds like a firm of solicitors) was installed in 1975/76 with SA4 & S4B looms which still may be the original ones. A further Jute mill was installed in 1983 complete with Gripmack looms which are still working today. The only name I have from this installation is Bobby Cooper ? I think Mackies missed out big time in Burma as they should have sold far more over the years, than 3 mills.
Justice for the Massacred of La Mon and other atrocities.  The TRUTH will set them FREE.
Justice for the RUC and British Army. Support Soldier F

Lost Login

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6161 on: December 22, 2016, 11:02:30 PM »
I'm sorry to say that another Mackies worker has passed away. His name was Bob McCullough who was one of the patternmakers. He died last June, aged 85 through illness. I remember him quite well during my time in the Iron Foundry (1984-1990).

Bob became deaf after falling off his bike as a child on the Trooperslane Road, Carrickfergus. He never let that disability stop him. He regularly wrote the "Deaf Talkabout" column in the Belfast Telegraph. He was a mature student of the Open University and achieved an MA in English.
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bothy

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6163 on: December 27, 2016, 03:41:02 PM »
Hi Lost Login, sorry to hear about Big Bob's death. I served my time in the patternshop and new Bob well. He was a lovely man and will be sadly missed.

martinegibson

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Re: James Mackie & Sons
« Reply #6164 on: December 31, 2016, 09:57:05 PM »
Does anyone remember Davy Artt who worked for Mackies for many years? He traveled all over the place as an OE - Poland, Italy, Belgium, Tunisia, Algeria, Zambia to name a few. I am his daughter, Martine, and sometimes me and my mum traveled with him. He is 79 now and would love to hear from some old work colleagues. Him and my mum Ina Artt live in Bangor after many years living in Spain. My mum also worked in Mackies for a while,

Names I remember from when I was very young are Brian McKinney (I know Brian died tragically), Tom Herdman, John and Rhoda, Stanley, Harry and Ness....

He has a lot of old photos and it looks like good times.