Author Topic: 11th Night  (Read 14468 times)

screengoddess

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Re: 11th Night
« Reply #105 on: July 30, 2016, 10:05:03 PM »
I think 109 would have been down the 'big hill', near the Woodburn Hotel. I used to roll down that hill  :D and end up with green knees.  Those definitely were carefree days.  Great times.

Do you remember Roffossi's sweetshop? (not sure of the spelling) and his wife Mrs Roffossi had a wee woolshop, next to the fish shop (Ewing's maybe?).

Im trying to think when we left, I think it would have been around 1973.
Do you know any one called Curry in Tildarg ave??

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Re: 11th Night
« Reply #106 on: August 30, 2016, 05:24:37 PM »
There's not as many bonfires these days. They used to be on every other street corner almost. I think people just don't want the mess and racket in their street anymore.

That's certainly true. When I lived close to the peace line off the Crumlin Road, there was always a big bonfire in the middle of Ohio Street and Disraeli Street. Another bonfire was placed at the bottom of Rosebank Street.

I remember a corner shop keeper, Jimmy Logan who died in 1995. Every 11th night he draped a tarpaulin over the front of his shop and hosed water over it all night.

The cornershop in Disraeli Street/Ohio Street was different. I watched it catch fire in 1983 after the wind fanned the flames the wrong way. The family inside were running in and out, trying to save as much of property as possible. The fire brigade were called and after putting the shop fire out, one of the firemen tried to house down the bonfire. The specatators weren't best pleased and there very nearly was a worker's revolution.
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teragram

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Re: 11th Night
« Reply #107 on: August 30, 2016, 05:40:59 PM »
Sounds like the fires were more important to the spectators than the people who lived near them, and their properties.
If you don't do it you won't get caught.

James James

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Re: 11th Night
« Reply #108 on: August 30, 2016, 08:38:43 PM »

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Re: 11th Night
« Reply #109 on: August 30, 2016, 11:32:59 PM »
Sounds like the fires were more important to the spectators than the people who lived near them, and their properties.

In my experience, that goes without saying especially living so close to the Crumlin Road. I remember one day, I was on my way home from buying sweets and a comic out of Jimmy Green's shop in Disraeli Street. At the junction of Disraeli and Ohio Streets, there was an old pub which had been demolished and was being used as a space to stockpile wood for the big bonfire.

I walked past it and I heard a shout from one of the local lads who were "guarding" the wood.

"Hey, you! Are you a prod?"

"Yes"

"Are you a good prod? You could collect wood for bonfire".

I didn't answer to something I found mutually exclusive. Collecting for the bonfires in the 70's in that part of North Belfast wasn't something I wanted to do.  At the time, no pallets or tyres were placed on the bonfires. Wood came from the many derelict houses that were in Rosebank Street and Disraeli Street - not least the old derelict shops that were on the Crumlin Road. Every shop from Cambrai Street, all the way up to Chief Street was stripped of wood.

Believe me folks, I had no intention of going into any of those old houses. It was too much of a risk.

I remember one 11th night when some people needed additional wood for the Ohio Street bonfire. They went into the entry that backed onto Rosebank Street and near to where the entry intersected with Disraeli Street, the "people" cut down a telegraph pole, disconnecting six GPO Telephone Service customers. After that, the telegraph pole was replaced with a metal one.

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