Author Topic: Belfast Linen Mills  (Read 101907 times)

True Hemp Clothing Int.

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #285 on: February 02, 2015, 03:03:55 PM »
L/Derry train stops at Mossley West a few hundred yards from the Mill.

I did a search online and found some good results. TY TY TY

JimIGS

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #286 on: February 05, 2015, 08:14:21 PM »
such lovely stories from all, living in ardoyne meant walking past the mills every day, my mum worked in one of them, don't know which one though, have often wondered what went on and what kind of work they did .thanks for the info.
Arder,
When I joined the BF about 3 years ago we had a slight contratemps about schooling when we were young. This is not a whinging letter but a simple explanation about things we didn't have living in the country 10 miles outside of Belfast.
To give you the reason why I wanted to go to High School after the 11+, I had spent the 1st 10 years of my life seeing my father coming home from Mossley Mill covered from head to foot with oil as he had spent the total day working in the spinning room keeping the machinery going and then when he got home he stood in a metal bath in the scullery trying to get the stench and feel of the oil from his body using carbolic soap and rags which my mother had hell of a time getting clean. He had started working in the mill at 14 after leaving school and that was the only job he could get other than work on a farm and there not too many farm jobs available, he retired at 74 years of age.
My older brother and I had made up our minds that whatever we had to do or work at we would not come home from work the way he did. Both he and my mother worked endlessly to bring up their 6 kids, one of them was 4 years old and was killed outside our front door by a lorry licence plate BBM673 which hit him with its far mudguard and he died 7 hours later. My parents swore that all of us kids would have things better and we were all encouraged to get better schooling and when they finished get better jobs than working in the mill.
A final note which made us more determined was when our aunt had most of her fingers on her hand removed after the hand got caught in the machinery in the mill, my sisters threw up for days afterward.
As I said originally a good 80% of the kids who lived in the mill's houses would have loved to go to an intermediate school but there wasn't one, I think the closest one was in Whiteabbey or maybe Glengormley, which is a hell of a walk from Mossley.
It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
It's about learning to dance in the rain.

JimIGS

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #287 on: February 05, 2015, 08:36:27 PM »
Mossley Mill is open to the public and houses a small Museum with some old record books dating back many years.
Harry,
When I was back home about 10-12 years ago I was fortunate enough that my cousin Ross Aiken took me down to Mossley Mill to see it and how the Spinning Room had been changed. I did not see the Museum as it was the early stages of the conversation but the one thing that really impressed me was that the staff were so very proud that they were part of saving the outside structure of the mill.
When Ross and I told them that my father was the Air Raid Warden and I mentioned that he used to take his little 5-year old son up onto the roof of the mill and pointed out the planes bombing Belfast Shipyard etc. I had meant to go back down to see the mill when it was all finished but unfortunately the last time I was home we spent most of the time talking to Ross and remembering old times in Mossley which he really enjoyed, but that was our last chat as he died of cancer just weeks later. Newtownabbey have erected a bandstand down in Jordanstown commemorating Ross and all he did for Mossley and Newtownabbey.
It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
It's about learning to dance in the rain.

JimIGS

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #288 on: February 05, 2015, 08:59:30 PM »
I served my time as a young Mackie outside erector in the local Flax Mills, Andrews,Comber. Killyleagh Flax Spinning , Tandragee Flax Mill, Cambles, Mossley Mill, Sion Mills, where I lived in digs next door to a pub , does,nt get any better than that. Then my boss in Mackies thought I was having too good a time and sent me to Italy for 5 years! to a flax mill :D  All the machine operators where female, Belisimo!!!! :D
Flaxman,
How in hell did you survive staying in Mossley when you worked at Mossley Mill, I have to assume you either got a lift up to Carnmoney or down to Monkstown if you wanted a drink???
It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
It's about learning to dance in the rain.

harrydunn

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #289 on: February 05, 2015, 10:49:18 PM »
another very interesting place is The Linen Museum in the centre of Lisburn County Down.

jmac

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #290 on: February 05, 2015, 10:53:48 PM »
another very interesting place is The Linen Museum in the centre of Lisburn County Down.
I can recommend it, I found it very interesting.
Illegitimi Non Carborundum.

Ubique

JimIGS

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #291 on: February 06, 2015, 04:58:35 AM »
another very interesting place is The Linen Museum in the centre of Lisburn County Down.
Harry if my memory isn't too full of confusion I think that the Museum in Lisburn has been there for much much longer, I seem to remember it being there about 15 or more years ago, it is and has always been very good. My wife's family all moved up to Lisburn from Ashley Avenue about 25 years ago and we always went into see if any changes had been made in the museum when visiting the family since then.
It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
It's about learning to dance in the rain.

harrydunn

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #292 on: February 06, 2015, 10:45:36 AM »
Harry if my memory isn't too full of confusion I think that the Museum in Lisburn has been there for much much longer, I seem to remember it being there about 15 or more years ago, it is and has always been very good. My wife's family all moved up to Lisburn from Ashley Avenue about 25 years ago and we always went into see if any changes had been made in the museum when visiting the family since then.
The Museum Building was I think The old Town Hall which was renovated when the Council moved to their new Offices now their City Hall I visited it some years ago and posted pictures on the forum.
check out their website here    www.lisburnmuseum.com/

misssmyth1

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #293 on: February 06, 2015, 01:57:45 PM »
jim IGS I read your post  with great interest and respect for your father and mother. People just did what they had to to look after their families . We had no say or choice where we lived or who our parents were .We too had good parents who did their best for us quite often under very difficult circumstances. We were brought up in the centre of Belfast ...Grosvenor Road ,and had the choice of good schools all within walking distance ,and my parents also made sure we worked hard at school to hopefully make a better life for ourselves. I have never heard of the place where you lived ...sorry for my ignorance.....My aunt worked in the mills in sandy row for  about 46  years  since she was 14   and walked there and back every day.  she left with no pension but her staff all clubbed together and bought her a present The management did nothing but she said she was glad to have had a job for so long when so many people hadn't .

M2471

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #294 on: May 26, 2016, 06:38:24 PM »
I am looking photos of the mill it both my parents worked there around 1955 their names where james mc nally and kathleen mc cann any info would be  appreicate thanks

JimIGS

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #295 on: May 27, 2016, 05:18:54 AM »
jim IGS I read your post  with great interest and respect for your father and mother. People just did what they had to to look after their families . We had no say or choice where we lived or who our parents were .We too had good parents who did their best for us quite often under very difficult circumstances. We were brought up in the centre of Belfast ...Grosvenor Road ,and had the choice of good schools all within walking distance ,and my parents also made sure we worked hard at school to hopefully make a better life for ourselves. I have never heard of the place where you lived ...sorry for my ignorance.....My aunt worked in the mills in sandy row for  about 46  years  since she was 14   and walked there and back every day.  she left with no pension but her staff all clubbed together and bought her a present The management did nothing but she said she was glad to have had a job for so long when so many people hadn't .
Thank you for your very kind remarks about my posting and my apologies for not answering much earlier but my arthritic hands and knees have been giving me so much pain in the past 3-4 months that I could not even type, and I was a keyboard operator in the University Press Typesetting company up in the Castlereagh area and continued when I came to Canada for a total of 31 years in the typesetting trade.
But, after I left Ballyclare High School like everybody else at 15 years of age I knew I had to get a job to help support the family and joined a wholesale clothing company where I was promoted to traveling salesman and spent many days on the Sandy Row, Donegall Rd. and Grosvenor Rd. trying to convince shop owners to give me an order. On different days I would also go up the Crum;lin Rd across to the Shankill and then finally down the Falls Rd to a very nice lady who owned a shop on Leeson Street who always made me a nice cuppa tea and we had many good conversations including a lot of her customers.
As I stated earlier on this thread of the forum my father also started his job in Mossley Linen Mill at 14, he was more or less self taught how to look after the machinery in the very wet spinning room of the mill and worked there until he retired after 60 years doing the same thing every day. When he left it was the ladies who worked on the machinery who got together to provide a retirement party NOT management.
Mossley is a village which is sort of in the middle halfway between Whiteabbey and Glengormley, close to Carnmoney. Due to my mothers way of bringing up her kids I never felt inferior to anyone and always remembered her advice to listen and then talk, however it was not until I married a wonderful and beautiful young woman and came to Canada in 1968, I then was given enough confidence from my wife to become a manager and eventually we owned our typesetting company until typesetting died in 1991.
Again my apologies for the delay and as also for my long winded chat but you learn how to do that when you become a salesman and I never forgot, the only thing I need these days is a short-term memory, I can still remember things that happened 50-60 years ago but very often I can't remember what happened a 50-60 minutes ago. Still I know that I started my 80th year on this planet a couple of months ago, I hope you enjoyed my spiel.
 
It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...
It's about learning to dance in the rain.

M2471

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #296 on: May 27, 2016, 12:22:06 PM »
Sorry it was the blackstaff mill I think was on Springfield Road thanks

maggs24

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #297 on: September 02, 2020, 10:49:43 PM »
I worked in falls flax spinning mill in 1977. My mum worked in Ewarts from she was 14yrs old. Had good times working there.  :)

maggs24

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #298 on: September 02, 2020, 10:57:39 PM »
I also worked in Edenderry  mill on crumlin road for a while and then ended up working in falls flax spinning mill.  My mum.and her sisters and mothers all worked in Ewarts mill.  I remenber 1977 the men got dust masks. The women didn't. We got paid less than men altho we did the same work.  Paid low wages.  But I have good memories of then.

maggs24

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Re: Belfast Linen Mills
« Reply #299 on: September 02, 2020, 11:05:53 PM »
My mum Agnes Mcdowel and her sisters Annie, Grace worked in Ewarts mill. . She worked there since she started when she was 14yrs old.  My gran her mother annie mcdowel also worked there. They came from Tobergil Street of Berlin Street on shankill road. Would love to hear from anyone who might know my mum back then in 1950s.