Author Topic: DONEGALL ROAD  (Read 382944 times)

Dawson

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Re: DONEGALL ROADgnes
« Reply #45 on: August 14, 2012, 12:09:34 PM »
i worked in the new city mineral water company it was on the last st on the left hand side of donegall rd coming up from the town just  before the railway bridge it was in the fifties i would travel on my cycle from the crumlin rd down agnes st then north howard st into albert st down mcdonnel st into roden st down to the donegall rd turned left and then right into the street the factory was on i cant rem the name of the st it was cool some thing can anyone rem the name gismo

Great Northern?????

mastermagrath

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #46 on: August 14, 2012, 07:55:05 PM »
hi gismo , the street was coolmore street, it ran from the top of thalia street , the one you turned up , and went along the city hospital wall to coolbeg street where the standard laundry was,i lived there in egeria street , the middle of them nine streets made famouse by grahame reid in his billy trilogy, was born there in 1965, and lived there until 1983, but my grandparents and great grandparents lived there since houses were built , i think 1930s, some fond memories of the dunny
no-one is born racist , homophobic , transphobic or prejudice

andy

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #47 on: August 14, 2012, 08:02:49 PM »

Can't disagree with that.
 
By the way could your grandfather he the same old solider whom my father  talked about?
sachs,  could be my g/fathers name was william thomas anderson  if that rings a bell
                               andy.
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shauneen

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #48 on: August 14, 2012, 11:24:09 PM »
i lived in colfin did you know anyone from there my friends were joyce taylor ellie winters and freda lowry my mom worked in the standard laundry and my husband was a van boy do you know esther couchman or anyone around there


mastermagrath

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #49 on: August 14, 2012, 11:55:19 PM »
hi shauneen, i see from your previous posts that you lived there before my time, however you may know some of my folks there was four cully girls, joyce,eva , angela  and sandra, their parents gladys and bob cully, and gladys parents daisy and robert kennedy, daisy was actually called sarah miller, but her two older sisters liked the name daisy and decided to use it and it stuck till she died aged 94
no-one is born racist , homophobic , transphobic or prejudice

george moore

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #50 on: August 15, 2012, 09:09:29 AM »
i lived in colfin did you know anyone from there my friends were joyce taylor ellie winters and freda lowry my mom worked in the standard laundry and my husband was a van boy do you know esther couchman or anyone around there
I knew Joyce and we were on a school trip (Linfield) to Belgium. The last I heard of Joyce was that she emigrated to Austrialia with her husband called Morrow who played football for the Crues.

Billy D

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #51 on: August 15, 2012, 12:04:58 PM »
My home at 122 Utility Street was the last to be demolished.

Billy D

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #52 on: August 15, 2012, 12:08:41 PM »
THE CHILDREN’S MEETING
I want you to picture the scene: One day in the 1950s, a mother is standing at the door of her freshly brown painted house in Mabel Street, Sandy Row. She is wearing a pinny with a small flowery pattern; she is looking up and down the street and drying her hands with a cloth at the same time. The mother had just left the jaw box (a Belfast sink) where she was cleaning the dishes, when she remembered. that it was the Children's Meeting night for her two children, Gordon and wee Sarah. They would have to get something to eat and washed in time for the meeting. She looked for her two children among the many playing between Bentham Street corner and Mabel Street hill. With no cars parked the street in those days she could pick out wee Sarah sitting on a rope with a swing attached to a lamp post. Her big brother Gordon and some of his friends had helped put the rope high up on the lamp post and a coat was then placed on the rope to make a soft seat.  ‘Sarah! Gordon!’ the mother called out. Wee Sarah came running, her feet hardly catching up with the rest of her body. Her brother Gordon came from round the corner where he had been playing football with a tennis ball; this was a bit of a luxury, as on many occasions the boys had to make do with an old tin can, hanky ball or even a block of wood. Gordon quickly catches up with his sister and both follow their mother into the house. After getting a cup of tea and some bread and jam their mother would help them wash their faces and hands with a flannel (face cloth) It was no joke getting your face washed in those days as mothers made sure every bit of dirt was cleaned off, your hair combed and that you looked like a new pin. This scene was repeated throughout the Donegall Road area and yes, right across the working class districts of Belfast.  As there was a meeting for children every night in some church or mission hall, the children could have went to a meeting every night and some did just that. They would be go to Clementine Street Mission with its ‘Union Jack’ window above the front door, Bentham Street Mission that was known as ‘Chappes’, Felt Street Mission that was known as ‘Browns’, Emmanuel Mission in Wellwood Street, known as ‘Downhams'. The Emmanuel had a stained glass windows like the Aghalee Bar beside it, and it was the stained glass windows that caused many a man to walk into the Emmanuel by mistake.  Then there was the Donegall Road City Mission at the library hill, Blackstaff Mission in Roden Street, where the Westlink is now and the Railway Mission close to Donegall Avenue, with its nice brick wall and railings in front of it.  Night after night throughout Belfast, the meetings were packed with children. The meetings everywhere had basically the same programme. With so many children all talking at once, it was a skill to get them quite before the opening prayer.  Gospel choruses with actions were very popular like ‘Deep and Wide’ and ‘Ten Men Went to Spy on Canaan’ Then there was the memory verse written in large letters on a black board. One verse that would be a must among the many verses selected was St John Chapter 3 and verse 6. ‘For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.’ This verse was often referred to as the Gospel in a nutshell. The children would be asked to read the verse out loud a number of times. Then a word would be rubbed out each time the verse was read, until the blackboard was left without any words. The children were then asked who would like to read the verse on their own. This often proved difficult for most of the children, as they had to say the verse without making a mistake. The best would get a small prize.  A flanalgraph board was often used to tell the Bible story. Felt backed Bible characters and Bible scenes were used to great effect. This was something new and exciting from the CEF (Child Evangelism Fellowship). The storyteller would have spent some time preparing the story, getting all the characters in order and rehearsing. Preparation was very important.  The Bible story came alive to the children as each scene and character was placed on the large flanalgraph. They sat with arms folded, as they also knew that the best girl and boy would get a prize at the end of the meeting. Sometimes during the story they would get a gentle reminder; ‘Remember boys and girls we are still looking out for the best boy and girl’. There were also many popular stories like ‘Barney’s Barrel' which came in the form of a large picture books or cards. There are a lot fewer mission halls and churches today with a traditional children’s meeting. I am sure that many people reading this will have old memories reawakened when they remember God’s faithful servants who ran the children’s meetings and the times they sat on a hard benches with sometimes hundreds of other children. I believe the Children's Meeting helped to make us what we are today.    Billy Dickson

andy

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #53 on: August 15, 2012, 05:58:42 PM »
THE CHILDREN’S MEETING
I want you to picture the scene: One day in the 1950s, a mother is standing at the door of her freshly brown painted house in Mabel Street, Sandy Row. She is wearing a pinny with a small flowery pattern; she is looking up and down the street and drying her hands with a cloth at the same time. The mother had just left the jaw box (a Belfast sink) where she was cleaning the dishes, when she remembered. that it was the Children's Meeting night for her two children, Gordon and wee Sarah. They would have to get something to eat and washed in time for the meeting. She looked for her two children among the many playing between Bentham Street corner and Mabel Street hill. With no cars parked the street in those days she could pick out wee Sarah sitting on a rope with a swing attached to a lamp post. Her big brother Gordon and some of his friends had helped put the rope high up on the lamp post and a coat was then placed on the rope to make a soft seat.  ‘Sarah! Gordon!’ the mother called out. Wee Sarah came running, her feet hardly catching up with the rest of her body. Her brother Gordon came from round the corner where he had been playing football with a tennis ball; this was a bit of a luxury, as on many occasions the boys had to make do with an old tin can, hanky ball or even a block of wood. Gordon quickly catches up with his sister and both follow their mother into the house. After getting a cup of tea and some bread and jam their mother would help them wash their faces and hands with a flannel (face cloth) It was no joke getting your face washed in those days as mothers made sure every bit of dirt was cleaned off, your hair combed and that you looked like a new pin. This scene was repeated throughout the Donegall Road area and yes, right across the working class districts of Belfast.  As there was a meeting for children every night in some church or mission hall, the children could have went to a meeting every night and some did just that. They would be go to Clementine Street Mission with its ‘Union Jack’ window above the front door, Bentham Street Mission that was known as ‘Chappes’, Felt Street Mission that was known as ‘Browns’, Emmanuel Mission in Wellwood Street, known as ‘Downhams'. The Emmanuel had a stained glass windows like the Aghalee Bar beside it, and it was the stained glass windows that caused many a man to walk into the Emmanuel by mistake.  Then there was the Donegall Road City Mission at the library hill, Blackstaff Mission in Roden Street, where the Westlink is now and the Railway Mission close to Donegall Avenue, with its nice brick wall and railings in front of it.  Night after night throughout Belfast, the meetings were packed with children. The meetings everywhere had basically the same programme. With so many children all talking at once, it was a skill to get them quite before the opening prayer.  Gospel choruses with actions were very popular like ‘Deep and Wide’ and ‘Ten Men Went to Spy on Canaan’ Then there was the memory verse written in large letters on a black board. One verse that would be a must among the many verses selected was St John Chapter 3 and verse 6. ‘For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.’ This verse was often referred to as the Gospel in a nutshell. The children would be asked to read the verse out loud a number of times. Then a word would be rubbed out each time the verse was read, until the blackboard was left without any words. The children were then asked who would like to read the verse on their own. This often proved difficult for most of the children, as they had to say the verse without making a mistake. The best would get a small prize.  A flanalgraph board was often used to tell the Bible story. Felt backed Bible characters and Bible scenes were used to great effect. This was something new and exciting from the CEF (Child Evangelism Fellowship). The storyteller would have spent some time preparing the story, getting all the characters in order and rehearsing. Preparation was very important.  The Bible story came alive to the children as each scene and character was placed on the large flanalgraph. They sat with arms folded, as they also knew that the best girl and boy would get a prize at the end of the meeting. Sometimes during the story they would get a gentle reminder; ‘Remember boys and girls we are still looking out for the best boy and girl’. There were also many popular stories like ‘Barney’s Barrel' which came in the form of a large picture books or cards. There are a lot fewer mission halls and churches today with a traditional children’s meeting. I am sure that many people reading this will have old memories reawakened when they remember God’s faithful servants who ran the children’s meetings and the times they sat on a hard benches with sometimes hundreds of other children. I believe the Children's Meeting helped to make us what we are today.    Billy Dickson

 hi bill,   what memories,  i was one off thoes kids and along with my we brother would go
 tothe we hall in bentham st, and the one at the top off eureka st, and the one on libery
 hill,  and yes it set me up for the rest off my life.
  we lived in bentham st,  and i was amember off the 38th B.B. donegall road methodist church rihgt up to my 18th b/day.
yy u r yy u b i c u r yy 4 me

boops

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #54 on: August 15, 2012, 08:53:51 PM »
Billy D,
       How right you are in saying those wee Mission Halls made some of us what we are today.I went to Felt st.,and the 'Wee Hut' as well as our own Sunday School in St.,Aidan's.
      I was given a Bible card one night in 'The Hut' and kept it in my Bible for many years until it fell apart,the picture on it, was an open walnut
surrounded with flowers and the verse was 'For God so loved the world', which has always been and remains my most loved verse in the Bible.
I  wonder if men, like Harry Armstrong,Willie Bloomer,Harry Murphy and Willie Donnolly etc.,would ever have thought then, how many children would still appreciate those happy nights of stories and wonderful hymn singing, sixty odd years later on.

Dommo

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #55 on: August 15, 2012, 09:20:14 PM »
hi andy, i came from tavangh st in what is now known as the villasge.I remember all those streets well and more in sandy row. I went to the old St Simons primary school in the 50s. Love to hear from anyone else who knows the area as it was.
I am not from there, but nearby but was there in May this year. They are knocking down a lot of the houses and and the area has changed a lot. Many of the houses look empty.
if yer gonna act the chivo, beware the chupacabra

andy

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #56 on: August 16, 2012, 08:00:33 PM »
Billy D,
       How right you are in saying those wee Mission Halls made some of us what we are today.I went to Felt st.,and the 'Wee Hut' as well as our own Sunday School in St.,Aidan's.
      I was given a Bible card one night in 'The Hut' and kept it in my Bible for many years until it fell apart,the picture on it, was an open walnut
surrounded with flowers and the verse was 'For God so loved the world', which has always been and remains my most loved verse in the Bible.
I  wonder if men, like Harry Armstrong,Willie Bloomer,Harry Murphy and Willie Donnolly etc.,would ever have thought then, how many children would still appreciate those happy nights of stories and wonderful hymn singing, sixty odd years later on.

 hi boops,  my dad used to clean the we hut the back off our house in bentham st, and i
               used to help him rearrange the seating for the prayer meetings,  harry and him
               where good friends,  and your correct we got a good grounding and it stuck
               by us all these years later,  i still tell my g/kids some off the stories.
 
                     L.O.L.     andy      bill anderson
yy u r yy u b i c u r yy 4 me

boops

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #57 on: August 17, 2012, 12:26:18 PM »
Hi Bill,
         Did you ever go to Mrs Brown's Felt st., Mission,I would go with my aunt and granny ....there was also great concerts in it,with local talent,like,Ruby Moore and Molly Bell dancing and singing ,and during the Summer there was bus outings for the mothers and children, it was a simple way of life but a very happy one.

Billy D

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #58 on: August 17, 2012, 03:25:50 PM »
 I was never in Brown's Mission Hall, but my mother went regularly. She brought some buns home from the 'parties'. We children in our family would wait all evening, fighting the sleep for mother to come home from Browns with a few buns. The mission halls did a lot for the people from working class areas; now we have community centres and groups, who can't operate without funding. I would ask members of the Forum -when they get time- to write about the people who run these mission halls and the things they remember at the meetings, parties and outings. It could be just a few lines. Let me start; I remember being in the wee hut, it was packed and all singing at the top of their voices, ‘Ten Men Went to Spy on Canaan’. It was bright and warm and outside, it was cold and dark. A man whose name I can't remember had a large fish skin and throw in our direction and then pulled it back. Then every one got a paper bag with buns and other eats, it must have been a party.

andy

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Re: DONEGALL ROAD
« Reply #59 on: August 17, 2012, 08:42:26 PM »
Hi Bill,
         Did you ever go to Mrs Brown's Felt st., Mission,I would go with my aunt and granny ....there was also great concerts in it,with local talent,like,Ruby Moore and Molly Bell dancing and singing ,and during the Summer there was bus outings for the mothers and children, it was a simple way of life but a very happy one.
  hi boops, i sang in the felt street mission, i knew rubby well we sang in the belfast city 
               hospital in a concert run by the british army, and we davy jones was there
               there was also a girl ilene gigan [not sure of the spelling] who also sang
                                andy.
yy u r yy u b i c u r yy 4 me