Author Topic: Is Ulster Scots a Language?  (Read 24666 times)

apalachie

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #60 on: December 05, 2010, 05:43:59 AM »
Tá mé bródúil as Gaeilge Uladh fear ó na Seanchille. Ní féidir liom labhairt focal amháin de na gaeilge. An chuid is mó de na póstaeir Gàidhlig phost ach amháin chun a thaispeáint conas éagsúla atá siad.

SG

It,s marvellous what you can get on an i- phone, and all for free haha. :D
Oh for all our yesterdays.

doare.

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #61 on: December 05, 2010, 05:44:37 AM »
well i figure if some want to keep it alive its ok with me,there are still 3 gaeltachts in ireland, it will never be a fully functional everyday language but if a percentage want to use it, go ahead.when a language is lost or drops out of use, something is missing i believe , although i dont speak either, we got some in school, and latin as well.when i was back about 7 yrs ago, i watched rte in my mas place , they were talking about irish gaelic , a bit of a revival in the north, there was a line up in the school for infants being taught, but one scottish poet said "the gaelic in scotland was like an old sick aunt, in a backroom , everyone wondering when will she die" i knew a few guys who were not that academic, and they were now speaking fluent gaelic, so i am open...
"You see things; you say, 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say 'Why not?” ....shaw..

Sandgroper

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #62 on: December 05, 2010, 05:52:02 AM »

It,s marvellous what you can get on an i- phone, and all for free haha. :D
Sorry I haven't got an i-phone. Translation courtesy of Google translate.
 
Sg

Sandgroper

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #63 on: December 05, 2010, 06:01:50 AM »
well i figure if some want to keep it alive its ok with me,there are still 3 gaeltachts in ireland, it will never be a fully functional everyday language but if a percentage want to use it, go ahead.when a language is lost or drops out of use, something is missing i believe , although i dont speak either, we got some in school, and latin as well.when i was back about 7 yrs ago, i watched rte in my mas place , they were talking about irish gaelic , a bit of a revival in the north, there was a line up in the school for infants being taught, but one scottish poet said "the gaelic in scotland was like an old sick aunt, in a backroom , everyone wondering when will she die" i knew a few guys who were not that academic, and they were now speaking fluent gaelic, so i am open...

I mostly agree with you doare, but for people to use it on places like this, where most posters dont understand what they are babling about, is plain and simply rude. It's just like walking into a room and everyone is speaking normally and you and your companions start to talk in a different language so that it's posible that some of the listeners may think they are being mentioned in a derogatory manner. Boils down to simply good manners.
 
Sg

Paul.W

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #64 on: December 05, 2010, 09:29:00 AM »
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia                                                                                                                           Jump to: navigation,               search                                                            "Irishman" redirects here. For other uses, see Irishman (disambiguation).This article is about the Irish as an ethnic group and nation.  For information on the population of Ireland, see Demography of Ireland.For other uses, see Irish (disambiguation).
[size=88%]Irish people
(Éireannaigh)
[/b]
[size=80%]
[/size]
[/size]The Irish people (Irish: Muintir na hÉireann, na hÉireannaigh, na Gaedhil) are an ethnic group who originate in Ireland, an island in northwestern Europe. Ireland has been populated for around 9,000 years (according to archaeological studies, see Prehistoric Ireland), with the Irish people's earliest ancestors recorded[9] have legends of being descended from groups such as the Nemedians, Fomorians, Fir Bolgs, Tuatha Dé Danann and the Milesians the last group supposedly representing the "pure" Gaelic ancestry, and still serving as a term for the Irish race today. The main groups that interacted with the Irish in the Middle Ages include the Scottish people and the Vikings, with the Icelanders especially having some Irish descent. There is also DNA evidence of a small but very consistently occuring admixture of Spanish-Moorish(North African) DNA in many parts of Ireland, possibly due to historical contact with Spanish and Portuguese fishermen who have traditionally fished off of Irelands West coast. The Anglo-Norman invasion of the High Middle Ages, the English plantations and the subsequent English rule of the country introduced the Normans and Flemish into Ireland. Welsh, Picts, Bretons, and small parties of Gauls and even Anglo-Saxons are known in Ireland from much earlier times.
There have been many notable Irish people throughout history. The 6th century Irish monk and missionary Columbanus is regarded as one of the "fathers of Europe",[10] followed by Kilian of Würzburg and Vergilius of Salzburg. The scientist Robert Boyle is considered the "father of chemistry". Famous Irish explorers include Brendan the Navigator, Ernest Shackleton, and Tom Crean. By some accounts, the first European child born in North America had Irish descent on both sides;[11] while an Irishman was also the first European to set foot on American soil in Columbus' expedition of 1492.[12]
Until the end of the early modern period, the majority of educated Irish were proficient at both speaking and writing in Latin and Greek.[13] Notable Irish writers in the English language include Bram Stoker, Jonathan Swift, James Joyce, Flann O'Brien, Oscar Wilde, William Butler Yeats, Samuel Beckett, Patrick Kavanagh and Seamus Heaney. Some of the 20th century writers in the Irish language include Brian O'Nolan (aka Flann O'Brien), Máirtín Ó Cadhain, Pádraic Ó Conaire, Tomás Ó Criomhthain, Peig Sayers, Muiris Ó Súilleabháin and Máirtín Ó Direáin.
Large populations of people of Irish ethnicity live in many western countries, particularly in English-speaking countries. Historically, emigration has been caused by politics, famine and economic issues. An estimated 80 million people make up the Irish diaspora today, which includes Great Britain, the United States, Australia, Canada, Argentina, Chile, Jamaica, Trinidad, South Africa, New Zealand, Mexico, France, Germany and Brazil. The largest number of people of Irish descent live in the United States—about ten times more than in Ireland itself.

Paul.W

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #65 on: December 05, 2010, 09:30:10 AM »
Ment to say for education  :D

RobRoy

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #66 on: December 05, 2010, 10:11:12 AM »
RobRoy, now that you have established credentials as sectarian bigot,
go on, explain! :scratch_ones_head:
 perhaps you can give reference to how much Irish you speak, 
not your business  :swoon:
or is just the odd go raigh maith agat?
did yer finger slip? ;)

apalachie

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #67 on: December 05, 2010, 11:48:37 AM »
Sorry I haven't got an i-phone. Translation courtesy of Google translate.
 
Sg

I stand corrected Sandgroper, My initial post of a wee bit of Irish (and I know it,s not right) was to have a wee dig at Stickyra as I couldn,t work out if he knew were he lived or not, it,s a long time since I was taught gaeilge in school and when you posted in Gaeilge I knew you were not  a fluent speaker because even I could see there were some inconsistencies in it. eg uladh fear is back to front it should read fear uladh, so again I apologise.
                                   Is mise le leas, Apalachie.
Oh for all our yesterdays.

Sandgroper

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #68 on: December 05, 2010, 12:12:59 PM »
. There is also DNA evidence of a small but very consistently occuring admixture of Spanish-Moorish(North African) DNA in many parts of Ireland, possibly due to historical contact with Spanish and Portuguese fishermen who have traditionally fished off of Irelands West coast.

Hi to you Paul W
 
I would have thought that the Spanish-Moorish DNA could have been in part linked to the destruction of the Spanish Armada on the northwest coast.
In the late 1950's I was working in Mackies and became friendly with a Donegal man. He was about 20 and I was a couple of years younger. Anyhow some relation of his died and he asked me if I wanted to go home with him to attend a real irish wake. Dont ask me where abouts it was but getting there entailed two bus journeys and some considerable time in a horse and cart. I dont think there was any other houses within miles. Very desolate area.
I had never experienced anything like it.
There were three professional mourners and everyone else seemed to be in a very happy and convivial mood. It was the only time in my life that I drank poteen (spelling). I wasn't much more than 17 and I'm sure they were looking after me, diluting my drink and feeding me up, so that I was able see the night out. To this day I dont know if they were catholic or protestant, as there were no religious artifacts of any sort that I saw, but there were very few who spoke english, and my mate informed me that quite a few of them were speaking spanish as well as gaelic.
 Sg

RabRow

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #69 on: December 05, 2010, 12:14:55 PM »
that link, just about sums it all up rab,a lot of broon stuff. :D

Yip indeed ignorant people seem to have the same reaction to it as they did with Gaeilge in days gone past ie a bogtrotters or leprechaun language. But Irish is still with us and so will Ullans. ;)

jemmy hope

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #70 on: December 05, 2010, 07:05:06 PM »
I said all I'm going to say RobRoy. Just scroll through some of you old posts--they say it all.
Two silly oul monarchs in battle did join, each wanting his head on the back of a coin, if the irish had sense they would throw both in the boyne.

RobRoy

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #71 on: December 05, 2010, 08:27:31 PM »
Ach yes, I thought it was just shootin off the mouth after a skinful! Take plenty of no notice an you'll be grand.

Skully

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #72 on: December 05, 2010, 08:42:59 PM »

Hi to you Paul W
 
I would have thought that the Spanish-Moorish DNA could have been in part linked to the destruction of the Spanish Armada on the northwest coast.
In the late 1950's I was working in Mackies and became friendly with a Donegal man. He was about 20 and I was a couple of years younger. Anyhow some relation of his died and he asked me if I wanted to go home with him to attend a real irish wake. Dont ask me where abouts it was but getting there entailed two bus journeys and some considerable time in a horse and cart. I dont think there was any other houses within miles. Very desolate area.
I had never experienced anything like it.
There were three professional mourners and everyone else seemed to be in a very happy and convivial mood. It was the only time in my life that I drank poteen (spelling). I wasn't much more than 17 and I'm sure they were looking after me, diluting my drink and feeding me up, so that I was able see the night out. To this day I dont know if they were catholic or protestant, as there were no religious artifacts of any sort that I saw, but there were very few who spoke english, and my mate informed me that quite a few of them were speaking spanish as well as gaelic.
 Sg

This is interesting re who the Irish really are

http://killarney-ireland.info/genealogy/dark-irish-celt-genealogy.html
Do not walk behind me for I will not lead, do not walk in front of me for I will not follow, just [censored] off and leave me alone!

tboy

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #73 on: December 05, 2010, 09:18:31 PM »
sorry Skully, but that old Spanish thing is bollo. Any surviviors from the Spanish Armada were quickly dispatched on the beaches by the Irish gurriers. official ;)

doare.

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Re: Is Ulster Scots a Language?
« Reply #74 on: December 05, 2010, 09:22:34 PM »
bryan sykes, again said in the "blood of the isles" the majority in the british isles, which includes ireland, come from the iberian peninsula, this includes ALL of us. so what was previously thought was the we all came from mainland europe, not so. SO IF WE ALL HAD OUR DNA TESTED, THE MAJORITY WOULD BE FROM IBERIA, the irish as a whole have the same genetic signatures as the BASQUES.THIS INCLUDES THE MAJORITY ALL OVER BRITAIN.the celt are the major DNA. 
"You see things; you say, 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say 'Why not?” ....shaw..