Author Topic: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages  (Read 6425 times)

Mooncoin

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Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« on: April 29, 2007, 10:07:32 PM »
Have any of our members taken classes for either gaelic or ulsterscots language.  I done a sign language course about 10 years ago, which I picked up easily enough and thoroughly enjoyed.  I wouldn't mind learning a little of ulster scots but then I wonder when would you ever use it, this is what happened with  the sign language, becaue I've never had the opportunity to use it I can hardly remember any of the signs.

Christopher

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2007, 01:45:38 AM »
Mooncoin, both Gaelic and Ulsterscots Language classes are shown on the Classified board For Sale section.

RabRow

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2007, 02:27:18 PM »
Have any of our members taken classes for either gaelic or ulsterscots language.  I done a sign language course about 10 years ago, which I picked up easily enough and thoroughly enjoyed.  I wouldn't mind learning a little of ulster scots but then I wonder when would you ever use it, this is what happened with  the sign language, becaue I've never had the opportunity to use it I can hardly remember any of the signs.

I went to an Ulster Scots Language Course. Wasn't bad, I think I learned a wee bit from it.

It got a wee bit to complicated when I couldn't quite grasp the difference between 'gar' and 'mak'. But I got over that hurdle. Only for it to be come confusing again when I asked a question regarding the two words :-\.

I would have been better not asking... :-\ :)

Mooncoin

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2007, 02:54:02 PM »
What happens once you learn the language Rab, do they have regular meets or anything to help you keep up what you learnt?

Christopher

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2007, 05:06:53 PM »
What happens once you learn the language Rab, do they have regular meets or anything to help you keep up what you learnt?

Hiya Mooncoin,

There's a free Ulster Scot monthly magazine which is available in libraries throughout Northern Ireland with some articles written in the maither tongue. There's the ulsterscotsonline.co.uk website and there are a fair number of events including the Highland Games at Glenarm Castle in the middle of July. There are Highland Dancing classes in many parts of Ulster ... in this instance the nine counties and not just the six counties. If you want to speak the lingo there are plenty of places where it is spoken in Co. Antrim and around the Ards Peninsula. Take a translator with you if you're heading for Portavogie. 

Christopher

RabRow

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2007, 05:11:40 PM »
Aye Mooncoin. But the one I was at was only a six-week thing. However,there are courses that are ongoing. I know there was one in the Ards area.

The guy that took the one that I attended was Ian Parsley,now an Allliance Councillor I believe. He could speak five different languages if I remember correctly.

If you are looking for anything like that try....www.ulsterscotsagency.com There might be something in the events section.

If you live abroad,or have friends abroad,they will send out their newspaper 'The Ulster Scot' free of charge,free of postage.

Christopher

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2007, 05:25:59 PM »
Maybe the Forum title should be in three languages now that the Assembly is about to be up and running. Lots of other things are already in the three languages ...

Belfast Forum ... Béal Feirste ... Bilfawst

I'm sorry I don't know the word for Forum in the Irish or Ulster Scots tongues
 

twocoats

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2007, 07:00:02 PM »
Don't be silly Christopher. English is Fine   Coats
Homophobia, racism, sexism, bigotry and sectarianism is still alive..

RabRow

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2007, 07:15:03 PM »
Maybe the Forum title should be in three languages now that the Assembly is about to be up and running. Lots of other things are already in the three languages ...

Belfast Forum ... Béal Feirste ... Bilfawst

I'm sorry I don't know the word for Forum in the Irish or Ulster Scots tongues
 

Well lets face it,one of the 'lead-ins' to the forum section,uses the word 'craic'

No gripe,just to point out that it was originally a Scots/Ulster-Scots word,which has been adapted into the Gaeilge. Maybe to be even-handed it should also have 'craik or 'crak' ;) :)

BigAgiesMan

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2007, 07:47:02 PM »
My current wife runs an organisation which is ultra PC, and the member of staff responsible for looking after people with learning difficulties came to her because she was concerned about the phraseology which she would have to use whenever she was 'translating' the definition into the garlic and the ulster scots. She had no problem with the garlic, but the ulster scots translation of somebody with a learning difficulty was ' a wee dafty'

I actually find that quite a comforting term since it conjures up a picture of whoever was saying it as a very sympathetic and caring person, who would take the person under their wing and look after them

Mooncoin

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2007, 08:35:30 PM »
BAM I can still remember a time when a wee dafty was used endearingly before all the PC nonsense I still think it sounds better than some of the offical tags that replace it.

RabRow

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2007, 08:42:26 PM »
My current wife runs an organisation which is ultra PC, and the member of staff responsible for looking after people with learning difficulties came to her because she was concerned about the phraseology which she would have to use whenever she was 'translating' the definition into the garlic and the ulster scots. She had no problem with the garlic, but the ulster scots translation of somebody with a learning difficulty was ' a wee dafty'

I actually find that quite a comforting term since it conjures up a picture of whoever was saying it as a very sympathetic and caring person, who would take the person under their wing and look after them

Aye,there was a bit of controversy about that particular term.  It was on Talkback, where it was first claimed that someone had used that term. Of course nobody had. The outcome was that Dunseith and the BBC had to apologise.

 Some like yourself, might find it comforting. But maybe not everyone would be of the same mind.

sammy toaster

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2007, 08:29:33 PM »
BAM I can still remember a time when a wee dafty was used endearingly before all the PC nonsense I still think it sounds better than some of the offical tags that replace it.
  i remember  seeing road safety signs on the backs of ice cream vans  years ago "mind that child he might be daft".

BigAgiesMan

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2007, 08:43:25 PM »
Were those the days when you asked for a 'slider' 8)

Christopher

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Re: Gaelic/Ulster Scots Languages
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2007, 12:54:39 AM »
an organisation which is ultra PC, and the member of staff responsible for looking after people with learning difficulties came to her because she was concerned about the phraseology which she would have to use whenever she was 'translating' the definition into the garlic and the ulster scots. She had no problem with the garlic, but the ulster scots translation of somebody with a learning difficulty was ' a wee dafty'


There nowt wrong with the expression "a wee dafty" :D Thon PC organisations are taking all the colourful phrases out of the English language. I hope they don't start on the Gaelic and Ulster Scots. Many of the phrases they've removed are a part of the development of the society in which we live today. Removing words because they're deemed to be politically incorrect is much the same as whitewashing history.