Author Topic: Gallaher's Tobacco  (Read 42220 times)

fionabyrne

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Gallaher's Tobacco
« on: May 23, 2011, 10:45:20 AM »
Hi all!
 
I am new to this website and was recommended to it to try and further research on Gallaher's Tobacco factories.
 
I am hoping people will have memories of working there who would be willing to share them with me.
 
Thanks,
 
Fiona

belle

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2011, 04:47:48 PM »
welcome to the forum. Fiona, what would you like to know?
 
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apalachie

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2011, 08:26:49 PM »
Yes Fiona, just pull up a chair and get it all off your chest love, our Dr Belle will soon have you as right as rain or testing Gallaghers products for them,lol.
Oh for all our yesterdays.

apalachie

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2011, 08:28:44 PM »
Oh, BTW Fiona, welcome to the forum and they're not all as nutty as moi.
Oh for all our yesterdays.

belle

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2011, 08:35:27 PM »
Oh, BTW Fiona, welcome to the forum and they're not all as nutty as moi.
oh thank you very much you've ruined my reputation now :D
and yes you are nutty :air_kiss: :air_kiss:
Love like you've never been hurt,
Dance like no one's watching,
Sing like no one can hear you.

fionabyrne

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2011, 09:32:08 AM »
I am on a year placement with National Museums and I am researching their Gallaher Collection. Really I am interested in hearing about what it was like to work in one of their factories and in general to get a 'feel' of the place.
 
From what I have gathered so far, it was a major employment for many in Belfast and that often whole families would have worked in the various departments.
 

zippy

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2011, 09:53:25 AM »
I was born in Valentine Street and used to stay in my granny and grandas house some weekends.
The Gallaghers factory was at the top of the street and i used to love the smell of the FEGS!
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Mary K. Rossi

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2011, 03:50:50 PM »
My aunt, Mary Kinsella, worked most of her life at Gallagher's.  It was not a pleasant job.  All day long she stripped tobacco leafs to be processed into cigarettes.  There is a book of photos called Caught in Time, by Alex Hogg, between 1870 - 1939.  It shows a photo of a Gallagher's girl and the conditions they worked in. 
 
Mary 1943

wonder woman

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2011, 07:38:11 PM »
Hello Fiona, i worked in the tobacco side of Gallagher's from 1968 to 1975. We produced pipe tobacco, cigars and snuff.
We worked on production machines weighing Condor sliced and ready rubbed tobacco in 1oz and 2oz packs, the machine then wrapped it and packed it. There was a lot of chat and sing songs and nearly every week we had someone dressed up carrying their decorated 'POE' and getting tied to a lamp outside cause they were getting married. We didn't smell the best at the end of the day but there was no smell of the money and they paid well.
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zeebeedee

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2011, 10:11:56 PM »
Around 1970-ish I had a friend who worked in Gallaghers and he told us there was a guy in Gallaghers who had no work to do so every day he turned up and sat in the rest room / toilet or whatever and read newspapers or a book till leaving time and drew his wages every week. Apparently he had been overlooked during some union negotiations and while his job had been made redundant he wasn't paid off and the union wouldn't let him be paid off retrospectively and management couldn't assign him another job.
Don't know how true this is but it was quite a talking point in the pub at the time and it sounds like something daft that the unions would have fought over back then.
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McGurggle

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #10 on: May 26, 2011, 04:05:53 PM »
Around 1970-ish I had a friend who worked in Gallaghers and he told us there was a guy in Gallaghers who had no work to do so every day he turned up and sat in the rest room / toilet or whatever and read newspapers or a book till leaving time and drew his wages every week. Apparently he had been overlooked during some union negotiations and while his job had been made redundant he wasn't paid off and the union wouldn't let him be paid off retrospectively and management couldn't assign him another job.
Don't know how true this is but it was quite a talking point in the pub at the time and it sounds like something daft that the unions would have fought over back then.
 :scratch_ones_head: :swoon:

Don't be daft...There was no civil servants workin in Gallaghers....Keepin' his job open when there was no work for him,  I ask ye! ;) ::) :unsure:
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aussietrekker

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2011, 12:36:44 PM »
My Ma was a "stripper" in Gallaher's in the 1940's, up until her marriage in 1953. Her sisters also worked there, and so did her mother in the First World War. Granny's job was putting the cigarette cards into the packets. She and the other young girls used to include a piece of paper with their names and addresses, and soldiers used to write to them. Mum said the stink of the tobacco never left them them no matter how much they washed. She'd go to dances, and the first thing a bloke would say was "I KNOW WHERE YOU WORK!".
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fionabyrne

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2011, 09:23:22 AM »
Hi Wonder Woman!
 
That really paints a picture! It seems to have been a job with a good working environment, always a bit of banter and craic! I have seen some of the Smoke Rings/Signals magazines and in every issue there was always a long list of engagements and wedding announcements and what gifts the workers brought for each other. Everybody must have got on quite well!
 
Thank you for sharing that
 
Fiona
 
Hello Fiona, i worked in the tobacco side of Gallagher's from 1968 to 1975. We produced pipe tobacco, cigars and snuff.
We worked on production machines weighing Condor sliced and ready rubbed tobacco in 1oz and 2oz packs, the machine then wrapped it and packed it. There was a lot of chat and sing songs and nearly every week we had someone dressed up carrying their decorated 'POE' and getting tied to a lamp outside cause they were getting married. We didn't smell the best at the end of the day but there was no smell of the money and they paid well.

fionabyrne

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2011, 09:26:34 AM »
Hi Mary,
 
This is quite interesting, most of what I have heard it was a pleasant enough job, perhaps this is a 'rose-tinted' view looking back on things!
 
I have seen some photos where there is a group of women just sitting around huge piles of tobacco leaves on the ground.
 
Thank you for recommending the book
 
Fiona
 
My aunt, Mary Kinsella, worked most of her life at Gallagher's.  It was not a pleasant job.  All day long she stripped tobacco leafs to be processed into cigarettes.  There is a book of photos called Caught in Time, by Alex Hogg, between 1870 - 1939.  It shows a photo of a Gallagher's girl and the conditions they worked in. 
 
Mary 1943

fionabyrne

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Re: Gallaher's Tobacco
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2011, 09:31:21 AM »
Thanks Aussietrekker,
 
I have heard that a woman who worked in a biscuit factory in belfast put her name and address in a biscuit box during the war, they wrote to each other and she ended up marrying him!
 
Do you know if your Granny ever got any replies?
 
Fiona
 
My Ma was a "stripper" in Gallaher's in the 1940's, up until her marriage in 1953. Her sisters also worked there, and so did her mother in the First World War. Granny's job was putting the cigarette cards into the packets. She and the other young girls used to include a piece of paper with their names and addresses, and soldiers used to write to them. Mum said the stink of the tobacco never left them them no matter how much they washed. She'd go to dances, and the first thing a bloke would say was "I KNOW WHERE YOU WORK!".