Author Topic: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk  (Read 52219 times)

JimM

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #30 on: February 26, 2015, 11:35:15 PM »
Well I got a contact for Willie McGann. Brilliant...[/size]

To continue with the original theme of this thread...

My favourite teachers included:

Paddy Joe Doris - that man actually changed the course of my life. He is the one who convinced me to come back to St Patrick's from a dead end school in Clydebank after a year away, and to rejoin my original classmates in third year. It made for a tough few months trying to catch up on the year I missed, but it worked out.

Una Hegarty. Great maths teacher, tolerant of bad behaviour as long as she thought the lessons were sinking in, but never let it get out of hand.

Rosie, our beloved Spanish teacher in 6th year. I went back to the school some eight years or so ago, and was shown around then by one of the Irish teachers from our day (damned if I can remember his name but a really nice guy). We were talking about old teachers, and pupils, when I asked about Rosie, saying that we had all fancied her rotten because she was young and pretty. He responded "Yeah, I remember Rosie. In fact, I married her." God you could have fried an egg on my face. He thought it was hilarious, however, and took me to meet her! Unbelievably, Rosie stepped out of her classroom, took one look at me, and exclaimed "Jimmy Malaugh! What are you doing here?". How she did that is beyond me. A lovely lass, and still looked pretty too...


I remember the drummer boy geography teacher. Was always knackered because he had been up drumming half the night, and he couldn't control the class. He caught me spitting at one of the McLaughlin twins in class and sent me to Tim McCall, our form teacher. He and I didn't get on well because I had decided history wasn't for me, and I did nothing in his class. Wasted potential and all that. Tim beat me so damn hard with that leather and balsa wood strap that I had to ask for help to open the bloody door. Didn't flinch though :-)


Father Foy... what a star. My sister was a nurse, 8 years older than me, and she knew Father Foy from the night spots of Belfast. He would never hide the fact that he was a priest, still dressed in black but with no collar, but the young nurses all thought he was some sort of untouchable Papal rock star. Great sense of humour. Took the [censored] out of me in Chemistry or religion class then told me it was because he knew I could take it. He was right... it was great craic.


Our Physics teacher for all seven years, whose name evades me. One of those "hard as nails" characters, he would aim a wooden duster straight at your head if he caught you not paying attention. Having said that, he watched me copy our weekly Wednesday test from the more studious pupil beside me for three and a half years (Thanks to Eugene Rooney for providing all those correct answers in sixth and seventh years), then told me after mock A levels that he had let me get away with this and not said a thing because he trusted me to come through in the end! Talk about shame... Unbelievable.


Pascall, of course. The dapper man about town. Taught me Latin for 5 years. That man had an amazing party trick. He could remember numbered lists of objects. One of our lads (Willie maybe?) kept a list from first year of about fifty everyday objects. Pascall had memorised them and when the list was pulled out five or so years later, he could still match numbers with objects. Impressive. Was also seen about town with really good looking women on regular occasions!


Finally, Father Joseph Conway. I owe a huge debt to that man too. He had me marked out for academic greatness from day one, and as a result, I got away with blue murder. He did get very upset when I got thrown out after one year at University. I know he felt personally let down, which was a shame, but in reality it was his dream for me, not mine! What he achieved at St. Patrick's was remarkable. It always felt like his school, his personal project.



I loved the videos on Youtube. There was even a clip of "The Mound" with some of the lads running across it. I remember Jimmy Sweeney and me managing to run across it in opposite directions, passing in the middle, and thinking we were God's gift.


Happy days, despite the troubles...


Jim (then known as Jimmy) Maiaugh

hungry homer

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #31 on: February 28, 2015, 10:02:15 PM »
Does any one remember a Mr. Welsh who taught at St. Pats between 1970 -72? He was Scottish and a right bad tempered [censored]***d. He had a son at St. Pats as well.

Then there was Yogi - Mr. Loughran who taught English; I had him in 4th and 5th year (1971 -73). He lived round the Ormeau Road.

I also heard it mentioned that someone taught at St. Pats and wasn't properly qualified; the "offender" for want of a better word was supposed to have been there towards the end of my time in the early 70s and spoofed to Fr. Conway about his qualifications and constantly put him off when asked to provide them.

irishcolum

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #32 on: February 28, 2015, 10:23:38 PM »
Yes, Mr Welsh had a wicked temper...along with that Scotch accent. He taught Music, I think. Glad I wasn't in any of his classes...no talent.!
I remember Yogi. Do you remember another English teacher, Martin Bakewell? Great guy, but  poor teacher. Couldn't control his rowdy classes. Totally took advantage of him. We 'd throw paper planes with spitballs on the tip at him when he had his back to the class ! I'm very ashamed now !

hungry homer

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #33 on: March 01, 2015, 05:02:06 PM »
I don't remember a Mr. Bakewell.

In my 3rd year we had a Mr. Scullion for English - a really nice guy but again unable to control a class. One day one of the lads (I won't say who) got hold of a sheet of headed notepaper and typed a letter to him saying his services were no longer required. He managed to forge Fr. Conway's signature by tracing an original signature onto the letter, which was left on Mr. Scullion's desk.

Although Fr. Conway probably reassured him it was a hoax, he didn't come back to St. Pats.

I remember an art teacher who was nicknamed "Manfred" - he was a bit of a character.

DBG

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #34 on: March 04, 2015, 03:54:43 AM »
Ref above: Marty ("thirsty weather Martin!) Bakewell. Malachy Scullion. Two pleasant gentlemen; but maybe didn't have the nous to keep a classroom in check.[/font][/font]
 [/font]
Malachy once chased a bunch of bigots who were setting out to attack us one afternoon as we were gathering for our various buses which used to pick us up outside the school at Tullycarnet. That was in my second year I think, some time in 70-71.. He drove his car, if I remember right, up the large grass bank that bordered the parking area where we met the buses, and scattered the makings of a mob that were stoning us[/font]
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Soon after that the pick up-area was moved to directly outside the school gates at the other end of the  school grounds, Kingsway (?). [/font]
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Can't agree about Dan McCall. He had an ego the size of the all weather pitch and taught  history like it should be scripted as a soap. Basically very conservative[/font]
 - Ireland: lovely nice Irish catholics horribly put upon by nasty British protestants[/font]
 - World (example) melodramatically re-enacting how the rebels were beheaded after the Boxer Rebellion,   .etc. [/font]
He put me off doing history once it wasn't compulsory.[/font]
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I was at Pat's from 69 - 76. I was in the same cohort as Kenny Eccles, Colum (Tufty) O'Hare (above). [/font]
Kenny knew about Turlough Mckeown's sad death; but seems unaware that Austin Hinds also sadly passed away (1988).[/font]
 [/font]
That period - 69 to 76 encompassed a convulsive time. I vividly remember being taken by my mother to the school on a warm summer's evening in August(?) 1969, via the kind offer of a lift from a neighbour. My mother was to visit the school for an 'interview'. In spite of the portakabins the school’s setting and ambience were quite pleasant. YThey had the feeling of  the country in the town. [/font]
My mother did the meet with Joe Boss and my fate was sealed. Basically Joe Conway was sussing the parents so he could 'stream' the classes (A to D).[/font]
 [/font]
 At that time it was exciting to be embarking on this journey of a new school; but also excitng because of everything that could change all around the world - Veitnam, America, France,   Ireland.[/font]
 [/font]
But the school was part of the system, [/font]
Nevertheless, in spite of the class prejudices that I believe insinuated all facets of school life, St Pats also expressed something of the progressive ethos of the time. There were things about being at that school that were liberating.. Though I think that by about 73, when the upsurge for change in Ireland was defused, the mood in the school also changed; became depressive.[/font]
 [/font]
The best teacher I had was William Thompson, chemistry. His 'stern' manner was just an expression of his serious attitude to work. He was one of  the fairest, and therefore most able,  teachers that I remember (along with Kearney - Latin and Ancient History). I liked them both. I couldn’t care less about their ‘stern’ manner, to me they were both essentially civil, and very competent.[/font]
 [/font]
Ghosty Marron was a very decent spud. [/font]
Jamesy Tart (Sullivan) a cynic, with a permanent sneer on his mouth. More interested in working out who he should put his fiver on than teaching us linear equations.[/font]
 [/font]
Seamus McKee was first rate (English and French). [/font]
John 'Duke' McGiukian (Geography) wasn't. He seemed different; but actually couldn't be bothered with the effort.[/font]
He also carried that catholic education meanness of spirit. [/font]
 When I finally could afford football boots (3rd year, 1972) he picked me for the school Gaelic Football team, just because I was fast and tall. One Saturday my mother didn't call me to catch the bus up to Belfast for a game (I'm a Bangor Boy) because the rioting, and murders, had been bad that Friday night. That following Monday morning McGuikian sent for me and gave me 'six of the best' in front of his class.[/font]
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What I remember about some of our classmates:[/font]
Paul McGuirk's father got a job in the 'Department of Agriculture ' in Australia or the Northern Territories and Paul emigrated about 1974. He was a funny guy; but maybe a bit cynical, like some of the middle class guys - always had a riposte, or put down. Sometimes too clever.[/font]
A bunch of us used to play informal mass handball against the gable of the 'main block'; and also the canteen. It was great crack. Two of the greatest wits in those games were Paul Donegan and Paul McGuirk. But they were closely rivalled by the sporting attitude and fun of posh English ex-pat Peter McRoberts, who took all slagging in very good humour, and wasn’t too bad at getting the ball back either.[/font]
 [/font]
Stephen Wasson drove a Mazda of which he was very proud.[/font]
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Hugh McGivern was very taken by CRACKington Haven in the Ordnace Survey mapps in 'O' Level Geog.[/font]
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Tufty O'Hare was a very pleasant fella. As was Paul Gargan. [/font]
Generally I thought bthe fellas from Soth Belfast were an amaiable bunch.[/font]
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West Belfast guys could be too sharp. [/font]
'Dya want some vinegar for that chip!?' Paul Lynch could be very defensive.[/font]
An intelligent boy who was embittered by events.[/font]
But maybe then you could say the political leadership has a lot to answer for?[/font]
Give a true lead and people have something to believe in![/font]
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Scrod was an ejit> I remember one morning before classes began he was bashing his arm of the edge of a desk so he could have reason for not having done his homework.[/font]
If I remember right Scrod was one of the tough guys who nwould regularly be involved in an arranged fight in the changing room at 11 break? Those fights weren’t pleasant.[/font]
Dominic O’hara, and another Ards guy. In fact, were there two Ards brothers who were part of that fights bravado? (Karl Marx: ‘rural idiocy’).[/font]
 [/font]
We (2A) had a great football team. I can’t remember who organised the little soccer tournaments; but they were great crack.[/font]
On our team we had a terrific keeper, slightly overweight; but I think he was the making of our team – Brian Crilly. Also, in my view a very under-rated player was  Paul Owens, mild-mannered and stocky. He barrelled forward from the midfield and was very hard to get the ball off. Stefan Murray was a posey attacker who wouldn’t [censored] pass! But he still made you lkaugh with his fine dandy nonsense. Mark Browne was probably the best palyer; but too self aware.[/font]
 [/font]
I think Kieran Ennis was a great player for 2c. Maybe he may have been the main guy in organising the little tournaments?[/font]
 [/font]
Can’t think of any other guys for the moment.

hungry homer

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #35 on: March 04, 2015, 07:34:58 PM »
DMB,

I was a year ahead of you and spent my time in the A stream.

I remember some of the guys you mentioned; Stefan Murray was too cocky. I remember Colm Coney headbutting him in a "friendly" - there's character building for you! I also remember us older guys taking it in turns to kick Paul Lynch black and blue on the football pitch, but fair play to him he never gave up, or gave up mouthing either. He works in the Housing Executive but not in the same department as me.

Hugh McGivern is a good mate of mine; we worked together in the Errigle Inn many years ago and found we had a mutual interest in giving the local bookies most of our hard earned cash.

Someone told me that Dominic O'Hara committed suicide many years ago - maybe someone from down the Ards could confirm that. as for the twins you mentioned, I think they were called Doherty. I remember an obnoxious set of twins from round Ards who were regularly on the "hit list" of us older lads.

The guys in my class i can still remember include Paul Browne, Mark's older brother - Paul was a decent guy, Michael Brady from Holywood - a walking encyclopedia, stanley Black another good guy who had the pleasure of rooming with me on Paddy Doris's Madrid trip in 1973 when I got my first hangover, Philip Gallen - a very witty guy who's doing well for himself as a solicitor here in Belfast and Sticky Maguire who is a retired fireman - would you have ever let Sticky put out a fire!

Among the Bangor boys i remember are Chris Kelly, Finbar Cross, Greg McCann, Terence Kearney (who was a year above me) all decent guys and hopefully doing well.

As for the teachers, I liked Paddy Doris, Mernock and Liam Kinney. I thought Dan McCall was a great teacher and he's spot on about the Irish and the English! You're probably one of those Bangor types who thinks Lady Sylvia Hermon is a babe! Altogether now "There's a uniform that's hanging in what's known as father's room. "

Among the teachers I didn't like were McGuckian (moody  ) and Welsh (Groundskeeper Willie on acid).

Anyway, enough reminiscing!


irishcolum

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #36 on: March 05, 2015, 10:17:18 PM »
Sad to hear about Dominic O'Hara and Austin Hinds. Nice guys, gone too soon.
Hugh McGivern was indeed a character. He'd give Pat Carragher, myself and a few others a lift to school in his wee blue mini. Even though we were all piled in, it was a big improvement over the bus we used to have to take back to the Ormeau Road. Pat Carragher's da was a clock-maker and had the distinction of winding up the Albert Clock. A name not yet mentioned is Paul Bradley whose dad ran a  TV/electronics repair shop on the Ormeau Road. He went on to Manchester to study chemical engineering.
My favorite teacher was Thompson, maybe because I loved chemistry. His stern demeanor belied the fact he had a heart of gold. One time in his brand new chemistry lab, I stuck a glass told right through my hand. He yelled at me to stop bleeding all over his newly varnished benches. Then he stopped the bleeding and drove me up to Dundonald hospital emergency and stayed with me as the glass rod was removed.

DBG

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #37 on: March 07, 2015, 11:47:23 PM »
I had heard before, way back in the 80s I think,  that Dominic O'Hara had committed suicide at some time previously; but none of the St Pat's fellas I still know were certain this was true.

I recall once queuing outside the portacabins that had been newly positioned down near the gateway that led to Kingsway.

It was 2nd year and we were waiting to [size=78%]go into either Geography, or Malachy Scullion's English class.[/size]

Domiinic started wantonly giving Paul Bradley a hard time. Pushing him about from behind and generally provoking him. Standard bullying stuff. Paul was a mild-mannered fella. No good at sports, if I remember right(???). Not one of the 'guys' who regarded himself, or acted like he was, something important. Dominic was a tough guy. This shoving and goading went on for a while.
Until out of the blue Paul slipped his schoolbag off his shoulder and in the same movement swung the bag with some force and caught Dominic with a whack that sent him sprawling in the gravel.
Silence. Dominic got up and walked away. That act by Paul Bradley was a turning-point in the attitude of the class to tough guys.

Paul's father had an electronics shop on Albertbridge Road, or sowewhere like that. Burnt out I think. Also I think then later his father survived the Rose & Crown bombing?

Dominic O'Hara often sought to make connections, one to one. He could be an ordinary personable Joe. Cruelty and violence obviously marred his life.
 
Apart from McGuikian slapping me for missing a game, I think I was also turned off GAA because it celebrated brutishness as the norm.


irishcolum

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #38 on: March 08, 2015, 05:37:06 AM »
DBG, you have a tremendous memory from all those years ago.
I was no good at sports and was a bit of a "swot" back then and got teased no-end for it.
I could relate to Paul Bradley. He was short and had a gentle disposition, so it's no surprise he was
bullied.
Did you ever go down to the Pound on a Saturday afternoon for the Jim Armstrong sessions ?
You'll have to tell me who you are, for I've racked my brain and cannot place you (message me privately if you prefer)
Cheers,
Colum

hungry homer

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #39 on: March 08, 2015, 01:18:16 PM »
My abiding memory of McGuckian occurred in my 3rd year.

Every now and again he would have a "purge" concerning people doing their homework in biro as opposed to fountain pen. I ignored one of these purges and handed up my homework in biro, only to be told to re-write it in fountain pen for the next time we had geography class.

We didn't get geography the next day, and I though by the time the second day came round, he would have forgotten about it. Unfortuantely he didn't. On Friday mornings we got geography second and third period, with the morning break in between.

McGuckian had me, Mickey Brennan and tommy McGreevy out at the front of the class for various misdemeanours. He started with Tommy McGreevy and took his his geography exercise book (which was one of those books with a graph page on one side and a lined page opposite) and ripped it down the spine, scattering the pages. McGreevy gathered up the pages pleading that he had worked hard on his geography, while giggling every now and again. tommy was built like a brick ****house, so there was no way he was going to be hit.

Next up McGuckian went nuts with Mickey Brennan, who was a small lightly made up lad, and threw him about like a rag doll. Once he got fed up, he sent Mickey back to his desk.

Then it was my turn. Having pleaded guilty to the charge of not having rewritten my homework in fountain pen, there was an ominous silence, and I noticed the look of horror on Finbar Cross's face; out of the corner of my eye I saw this hand coming at speed towards my face and so I tried to duck out of the way. As I was lowering my head, McGuckian's hand gabbed my hair and I learnt a lesson in physics that would have made Jackie Fitzsimmons proud of me.

McGuckian had torn a whack of hair off my head and the pain was excruciating; he then began ranting like Hitler at a Nuremburg rally and told me to take my bag and baggage and "funt off". The bell for morning break rang and we all left the mobile. Some of my classmates gathered round and asked what I was going to do. there wasn't much of an option, I sheepishly went in for the second period and by this time McGuckian had calmed down and apologised to the class for "going off on one".

One of my classmates was James Ward - does anyone know what became of him?


gerry holden

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #40 on: April 04, 2015, 12:12:00 PM »
i am fiarly sure i remember that happening in his class , was that in fourth year the first year they would mix u the A and B classes if i remember right

i used to go by the nickname Herbie (cant remebr the second part of it ) but alot of names sound fimliiar

i left in Dec 74 to go to canada (still here) joe dorian James steeles philip Beagon ,Bart , walsh , hiriam walket were all in my class

gerard holden any one remember me ? it would really nice to catch up with everyone

thanks

woodsey57

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #41 on: April 09, 2015, 10:29:59 PM »
Any old boys from this (Granmmar School) ?
 
I attended from 1967 to 1973 when I left belfast. Any pictures or shared stories will be gratefully received
 
The head was Fr Conway I believe
I also recall Fr O'Sullivan , Fr Pascal McCann, Mr McGee(perhaps Gee) Mr McKee (he was the newsreader I think)
 
Any contributions would be most welcome to help with my research
 
Thanks to you all and love always to Belfast I attended 67 to 69 got a good kicking from Fr,o Sullivan for messing about in class b2' got kicked out and went to st agustines along with denis dorrian from the markets,much better for me.

bjay

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #42 on: April 10, 2015, 07:13:50 PM »
Bernard Dorrian, Gerard Hughes and  Paul (Kipper)  Kerr were banished to St Augustines from St Pat's Knock around that time. Anyone remember those gentlemen and scholars ???

citybloke

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #43 on: April 14, 2015, 06:55:42 PM »
Knew Paul Kerr through his brother Robert [ Bobby ].  Bobby and I were studying in Manchester and Paul spent the summer with us. I think it would have been around 1972 or possibly 1973. Can't shed any light on Paul's academic exploits and what he got up to after his visit to Manchester.

bjay

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Re: St Patricks College Knock Gilnahirk
« Reply #44 on: April 14, 2015, 09:16:25 PM »
I first knew the Kerr brothers Bobby and Paul from their fathers fish shop on the Woodstock Road, hence the nicknames. St Anthony's boys. Their father sang in the  local chapel.