Author Topic: Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast?.  (Read 2115252 times)

KylieImill

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Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast
« Reply #13140 on: November 04, 2019, 08:02:38 PM »
Like the topic said anyone from this area and know any good crawling spots, i have a crawler almost done, just gotta finish connecting the links to my custom chassis and ill be ready.

Dargan

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Re: Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast?.
« Reply #13141 on: November 05, 2019, 09:48:39 PM »
Just a word about the history of the area.

I've been reading lately about the phenomenon of "Cat Steps": small steps cut into steep hillsides for unknown purposes. Generations of people either using them, ignoring them, or queying their function. I then got to thinking about the steps cut into the hillside of Premier Drive on the left-hand side going up. I remember how steep they were and they seemed to go nowhere. I played on them in the 60s. I always assumed someone with a garden higher up on the first street in on the left put them there, but a few? And to what end? It was hardly a handy short cut. Maybe they were a much, much older feature and inside the arena of this "cat steps" thing. It's funny, too, the amount of places with a "cat-holes" stone. All items from pre-history or many moons ago. Their meaning lost in the mists of time.

If anyone knows why the short flight of small, steep steps were cut into the almost sheer hillside at Premier Drive I'd love to know about it. Maybe someone once had the idea to annex the shole hillside and landscape it? I can't imagine that people spectating for free up above their level into Crusaders put them there (but I can imagine they used them for a leg up the side of that hill.  Another mystery, and on the subject, didn't previous posters (now of a bygone era on this thread) mention similar steps cut into the hillside at Ringan Point? Steps that went nowhere? My old pals Seaviewite and Walter mentioned them. Features like this fair light up the mind on a dark, winter night. We may never know.

Regards.  :hi:
Cryptic clue time: who wrote 1001 uses of vinegar but forgot chips? It's a war of attrition folks, make no mistake. Keep your thread alive. TF.

brixmis

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Re: Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast
« Reply #13142 on: November 06, 2019, 06:53:38 AM »
Like the topic said anyone from this area and know any good crawling spots, i have a crawler almost done, just gotta finish connecting the links to my custom chassis and ill be ready.
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Dargan

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Re: Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast?.
« Reply #13143 on: November 06, 2019, 08:06:38 AM »
The other thing I was thinking of was the de-forestation process which occurred around the shore-line, and if a time-line could be established for that? I know there's still a few of us doing a bit of research and trying to get to grips with these things even in this inane, "rolly eyes" and predominantly "lol" phase of the thread. But, as the saying goes, we put a stout heart to a steep path and motor on regardless of Tomfoolery. Back to serious business.

As we know, the hill country was where people lived centuries ago due to the fact that lowlands were heavily wooded. It seems to be much the same everwhere around Britain. It always seems to be a debate as to whether they did it for safety reasons or whether it was simply practical due to certain impracticalities connected to living in very thick forest, the haunt also of wolves. Either way I think we can probably say that there will have been some woodland tribes on our shore eschewing the uplands in favour of a life in the trees nearer the shore which certainly would have supplied food, fuel and the raw materials for shelter - even if they had to deal with the odd wolf. This is how Lowwood got it's name. And the low wood was certainly there long before the housing. Who lived in the original woodlands and forests? How many centuries ago? Is there anything under our gardens at a great depth which might prove it? Wonderful thoughts. Don't give up the search for information.

As I take all the stuff I have out of the box and look at photographs, books, my own notes and the pm's people have sent me giving their fantastic accounts of how they recall certain aspects of the road, it makes me wonder again about all sorts of things from prehistory to recent times. I think either Fortwilliam house or that of Sir Hugh McCalmont Cairns at Parkmount got the name of being the oldest on the road, in which case we can take the deforestation back to 1600 or before - perhaps. And if it is true that that infamous murder of the 12th century (forget the gringo's name at the moment) took place at Fortwilliam, then clearance was also, at least, in part done by then. For you can't gallop a horse through a thick forest, and come to think of it, neither can you have fortresses as the movement of troops etc. through forests isn't practical for it sets them up for ambush at every tree. We know that the foreshore was used for troops galloping along to the next carnage when the tide was out, but interconnecting paths for them to get elsewhere must have existed.

So it seems that de-forestation could be a thing of hundreds of years ago. That, folks, is a delectable thought to some of us bound to continue with this interest due to the contents of our souls. Imagine! Settlements in pockets where some woodlands had been cleared for a small colony. Or perhaps they lived completely concealed. Where we sat at tables and ate our dinner and watched Rentaghost in the late afternoons, people could have once been sitting in wooden huts cooking fish over a fire centuries before! Think of the blue woodsmoke, the animal skins worn by the people and imagine the convolution of some of the practical things of their life which we take for granted. For instance, was there a dew pond? (another mysterious creation even to this day historians can't get to the bottom of). Or was water collected at some kind of primitive well? These are very interesting considerations.

 I'm also now remembering that someone found a coin with 12th century date on it somewhere round Fortwilliam. Did he drink at the well before he dropped it en route to the fortress? Could it have been a lady who dropped the coin? Someone outside the fortress picking Dog Violets to dry as an ingredient which went into pies well into the nineteenth century? I mention these things because only imagination can help to draw out the realities latent in any situation from the past. It has to start with imagination.

I remember that Lester Colville, my uncle and myself looked at foundations quite deep underground at the elctricity sub-station at Sheringhurst, and that there were actually more under my mother's garden. But we know that land was empty except maybe for arable crop or grazing purposes prior to the building of Lowwood and Mount Vernon houses. Or do we? For again, the original Mount Vernon house, too, may have had a forerunner as a Miss Crawford was reported as having lived there in the early directories. 1819 or 20 which would appear to be a date prior to the building of the mansion we all knew which was erected around 1830. So were there earlier houses on these sites, and could the deforestation process have been something in part accomplished not few but many centuries ago? So many questions to ponder on the most mysterious and interesting road in Belfast.

Regards.  :hi:
Cryptic clue time: who wrote 1001 uses of vinegar but forgot chips? It's a war of attrition folks, make no mistake. Keep your thread alive. TF.

Dargan

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Re: Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast?.
« Reply #13144 on: November 06, 2019, 08:39:57 AM »
As the bacon fat in the grill pan collected into the shape of Northern Ireland this morning, I knew it was a sign to hammer the thread again. So, in an attempt to get as many ideas out there for y'all who are still interested and still looking for lines and strands of inquiry:

To STRANGFORDMAN: if you are still lingering on the forum, how about trying to get that interview with Neil Ward about his sister, Rita's, deep interest in the Shore Road's history and her pro-active stance during her lifetime? We could do with details of her belief that the Greencastle stood in the gounds of Mount Maon/Moan when that fanatastic old place was ignominiously torn down. She, Rita, is our next most famous sister, for no-one could deny that the footballer Molly Seaton is number one. I'm sure that girl would have gone great guns these days what with the women's game being up-and-coming more and more.

 :hi:
Cryptic clue time: who wrote 1001 uses of vinegar but forgot chips? It's a war of attrition folks, make no mistake. Keep your thread alive. TF.

welder

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Re: Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast?.
« Reply #13145 on: November 15, 2019, 07:42:48 AM »
Derelict buildings Shore Road / Grays

Derelict buildings, Shore Road/Gray's Lane, Belfast - January 2017(1)
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locomotive

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Re: Anyone from the shore road area of Belfast?.
« Reply #13146 on: November 16, 2019, 06:37:54 PM »
Is that the old "Donegal Arms"at the bottom of Grays Lane