Author Topic: st augustines  (Read 220693 times)

Chalkie

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1290 on: September 20, 2019, 03:45:18 PM »

I went to St Augustines from 1974-80.

Blinky & Sam!

John White
ex Short Strand

bjay

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1291 on: September 20, 2019, 06:43:54 PM »
  . and became a UTD. fan.   where did it all go wrong?

stranmillis v

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1292 on: September 20, 2019, 06:48:03 PM »
  . and became a UTD. fan.   where did it all go wrong?

nothing wrong with that, he's one of the better ones then.
"This society believed it was looking towards a new future, yet we consistently find ourselves being dragged backwards."

Bigot's are ignored by me.

Brendan sheridan

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1293 on: September 22, 2019, 12:55:09 PM »
Hi.
My name is Brendan Sheridan I was in the same class as Jackie Fitzpatrick and Paul Short some class

bjay

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1294 on: September 22, 2019, 04:28:42 PM »
I have a picture of the History Club with you, Gerard Carr, Dessie Armstrong, Shane McCann  in the back row.
[size=78%]I remember you hiding the attendance register under the front door mat.[/size]


marty1953

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1295 on: September 22, 2019, 07:22:05 PM »
Chat with Jackie Fitzpatrick a lot.
He’s retired now.
Taught in La Salle.
Speaking too Jimmy Rafferty up in the Roddys..keeping well.

Brendan sheridan

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1296 on: September 23, 2019, 02:00:05 PM »
Jackie was teaching Irish I met him in the staffroom in La Salle, I had just came back from teaching in Canada and was looking for notes from a teacher I trained with in Jordanstown (I was starting work in Strabane ) we had a good chat.I took early retirement four years ago ,finished up in S.E.R.C. in Newtownards ….not many teachers from St. Augustine's  there .
Who are you????????????/

Chalkie

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1297 on: September 23, 2019, 02:37:02 PM »

 I don't know when you went to Gusties, but this Short Strand boy was there from 1974-80, but the dinners were humming!  As for the desserts, they were disgusting - rice and prunes or tapioca with a dallop of jam.  The sponge cake was nice though with the raspberry jam topping and coconut and I usually got two bits as I hated custard.  And I got the meals for free!  But, I often sold my free school dinner for 20p and spent it in the tuck shop. I even got to work in it when our maths teacher, can't recall his name, knew I could count!
   
You just couldn’t beat a visit to the school tuck shop.   In Saint Matthew’s Primary School I knew that Mr Hill, the Headmaster, had a cabinet in which he stored the biscuits for the “Black Babies” morning collection.  But Saint Augustine’s tuck shop was a store room which was jam-packed with all the favourite sweets of the day.  Who can remember Golf Ball Bubble Gum, Spanish Gold, Cola Bottles, Space Invaders, Mojos and White Mice?  Those were the days when no matter what type of sweet tooth you had it was more than catered for.  Anybody who grew up in the 1970s will know exactly what I am talking about here because so many of the wonderful sweets that were sold when I was a kid can no longer be bought today.  I know you can go on the internet and purchase boxes of retro sweets but most of these just don’t taste the same especially the Chocolate Logs and Whoppers.  I know because I have tried them.
 

 

Chalkie

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1298 on: September 25, 2019, 08:18:47 PM »
My First Day at Big School[/size]
My first day at “Big” school in September 1974, was intimidating to say the least.  When our bus, the old double decker one which did not have a back door, remember them?, pulled up outside the entrance to Saint Augustine’s Secondary School on the Ravenhill Road, Belfast you could not see the school.  We had to walk up this long path with Saint Monica’s Girls’ Secondary School situated to the left of it.  As we came to the end of the path and turned the corner, there stood Saint Augustine’s; and it was absolutely massive.  It looked like a huge psychiatric hospital. Mind you some of the pupils who went there were but the full shilling if you get my meaning.  I mean, there were wiser out there eating grass!  I can remember seeing two mobile huts to the left of it and was thinking to myself how I would not fancy being taught in one of them.  And I bet they were bloody freezing in the winter.  There must have been upwards of 1,000 boys in the schoolyard (it was actually the school car park) and all the first year pupils were asked to move to one side.  This man was barking orders at us using a loudhailer.  I later found out that he was our Vice Principal, Mr Sam Donnelly.  Looking at him you certainly would not want to mess with him as he looked like a cross between Clint Eastwood and Sam Witherspoon.   [/size]
Our group was divided into five as the rest of the boys made their way into the main building.  Mr Donnelly called out our names, followed by what class we were to be in and I heard my name followed by 1M.  The M stood for the surname of our teacher, Miss Myles, and when we were given directions to our classrooms - you guessed it - I ended up in one of those bloody mobile huts!  We were also allocated a “House”, which we were told was to do with sports day and other competitions.  I remember these houses were named after Saints and there were four of them: Aquinas (Saint Thomas Aquinas), Bosco (Saint John Bosco), Savio (Saint Dominic Savio) but for the life of me I can’t remember the name of the fourth Saint.  Our Principal was called Mr Dolan, or “Blinky”, as he was nicknamed because he blinked incessantly.  [/size]
I found it really odd that as a Manchester United supporter I was in the minority in my class.  Glasgow Celtic were the most supported side, but in my class I had fans of Everton, Leeds United, Derby County and those kids who had gone to the dark side long before George Lucas had even conceived the idea for “Star Wars,” the Liverpool fans.  It was as if Manchester United fans were lepers or else those kids in my class who said they didn’t really support any team were actually United men like me but were just too embarrassed to admit to supporting a Second Division side.  Remember,United were relegated to the Second Division the previous May.  However, I had no such problem in showing my true colours (and hey, Candi Lauder, if you are are reading this post, where are my royalties after you brought out a song called “True Colours” in August 1986?  You must owe me a fortune!), because my schoolbag and my pin badges were evidence that I was a Red and proud of it![/size]
All the way through the 1974-75 football season (September 1974 to May 1975), I went to school with my Manchester United schoolbag.  It wasn’t anything fancy, a red heavy duty plastic bag with a footballer, a football and MANCHESTER UNITED FC embossed on it in white ink.  It looked like those Gola over-the-shoulder bags which are so trendy among young men today. At the beginning of each new school year my Mum would buy me a new schoolbag and this wasn’t because she was flush with cash.  Our schoolbags took some real abuse back then, and depending on what type you had, you seemed to attract the schoolbag-hating nut jobs.  You daren’t leave your schoolbag anywhere unattended because this was an invitation to attack it.  And if you were dumb enough to come to school with a leather schoolbag, you know the type that looks like a briefcase with shoulder straps, you were either the best fighter in your year or your Mum didn’t like you very much.  Those guys were singled out for special treatment and were lucky to get their schoolbooks back let alone their schoolbags.  [/size]
I can recall a cracking schoolbag I had when I was entering 3rdyear (1976-77) at Saint Augustine’s.  By 1976, schoolbag manufacturers had become a little more imaginative and this bag had a full colour side of the Manchester United squad, plus “The Doc” (Tommy Docherty, Manchester United Manager) and Tommy Cavanagh (Assistant Manager).  The bag was still made of heavy duty plastic but the United squad were depicted on a cloth canvas.  I think my bag lasted barely two weeks before it was defaced.  Some joker gave the players moustaches, beards, glasses and perms.  It resembled that photo you can see today of Harry Enfield sitting amongst a bunch of Scousers who all have the yellow rag on.  Alright now like, calm down, calm down.        [/size]
I made friends quickly at Saint Augustine’s by using the football  icebreaker every time.  Over the summer we had seen the World Cup finals from West Germany and me and every single one of my mates wanted Holland to win the tournament.  I was, and never will be, an England fan, so I was well pleased that they failed to qualify for the tournament.  The Brits, as in British Army if you are reading this in another country, in our area where I grew up (Short Strand, east Belfast) had started doing foot patrols by now and they all wanted the Dutch to win too, but we knew that this was because of the war and the fact that England were that crap they failed to even qualify.  The Brits tried to rattle us about Northern Ireland not being at the tournament either but they missed the point: we did not support Northern Ireland.  As far as we were concerned the Northern Ireland international team was a Protestant team and not very many Catholic players were in the team.  [/size]
But what a team the Dutch had at those finals: Johnny Rep, Ruud Krol, Rob Rensenbrink, Johann Neeskens and the best player in the world in 1974, Johann Cruyff (don’t forget that George Best had packed the game in by then).  But it was the Germans who won the final 2-1 with goals from Paul Breitner and Gerd Muller.  Neeskens had put the Dutch 1-0 up with a penalty after just two minutes.   Just to mention tennis in passing:  Jimmy Connors claimed the Men’s Singles title that summer and Chris Evert took the Women’s Singles crown.   We staged our own tennis matches in Harper Street every July and used white chalk to draw out the court in the middle of the road.  The net was made from two pieces of bamboo stick which we stuck in one of the holes of a brick and we then stretched some string from one stick to the other.  We had so many arguments about the ball not going over the string we ended up just drawing a line on the road to identify the net for serving purposes.  It stopped the arguments but allowed some cheats to fire in really low serves.  I was besotted with Chris Evert and had wanted her to win the title previous year, but she lost to Billie Jean King in the 1973 final.  Was it just me or was every other 11-year old kid watching ladies tennis in the summer of 1974 just to see Chris Evert?  And wow, wasn’t she beautiful?  The way she glided across that court with her fulsome breasts bouncing up and down and her skirt catching the wind.  Right that’s me away for a cold shower!  [/size]

Just one of the memories I have written about in “Kicking Through The Troubles- How Manchester United Helped To Heal A Divided Community.”[/size]

[/size]
http://empire-uk.com/kicking[/size]

[/size]
And for any of you ex-Gustie’s pupils, I did not even mention the welcome we got to the school from our fellow pupils, yes the head flushed down the toilet moment, but tell me, what was the name of the fourth house?

Chalkie
Ex Short Strand

LGAC

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1299 on: September 26, 2019, 12:04:28 AM »
Chalkie, I also went to Gusties 74 to 80. Are you the guy who had the issue with the fire extinguisher!!

Chalkie

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1300 on: September 26, 2019, 10:18:09 AM »
Not me.

marty1953

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1301 on: September 26, 2019, 11:23:02 AM »
OleLad will recall name of 4th house.
The VP Donnelly was a watered down version of Vincent O’ Connell ...scary man.

olelad

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1302 on: September 26, 2019, 04:11:03 PM »
they were all scary men the lot of them

marty1953

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1303 on: September 26, 2019, 05:07:38 PM »
What was the names of The Houses in Gusties.
Aquinas,Savio,Bosco?..fourth one?

bjay

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Re: st augustines
« Reply #1304 on: September 26, 2019, 05:39:47 PM »
They were Savio, Bosco and Aquinas in my day. I understand there were different names originally with each house having a coloured badge. I think those houses were named after irish islands.