Author Topic: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett  (Read 8881 times)

St.Anthony

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1608
Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« on: April 23, 2012, 01:20:02 PM »
Over the coming weeks I am hoping to post some poetry from my favourite Belfast Poet, Albert Haslett.  I have mentioned his poetry before on other threads.  These are from a signed book of his peoms called " Enjoy the Crack"
 
This one is about The Fight
 

St.Anthony

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1608
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2012, 01:26:57 PM »

hicky

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2012, 12:36:37 AM »
 Excellent stuff St. Anthony keep it coming , prefere John Cambell for this type off d/roll but I have enjoyed what I have read
                 so far ,  looking forward to your next installment

Windsor

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 206
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2012, 08:37:37 AM »
Very good, looking forward to reading more. Although I am not quite ols enough to remember lamplight the rest of the lines in the "Good Old Days" strike a chord with me.
Regards
Windsor
Immortality, it prevents you growing old gracefully!

doare.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14765
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2012, 03:23:53 AM »
anyone ever hear of a poem called "coachman john" i remember my da reciting some of it , it's about a coachman who is being made redundant because of his age he defends his abilities by pointing out (the poem) how he can take you all round belfast without going through a street, so avenues and places mews etc .
"You see things; you say, 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say 'Why not?” ....shaw..

Bugsy

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 112
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2012, 04:58:42 AM »
Probably adapted from this:

The Lord Mayor had a coachman and the coachman's name was John.[/size]Said his lordship to the coachman, "Take your wages and begone.I want a better coachman, for I'm going to take a drive."Said John, "I am the finest coachman you will find alive.And if you let me drive today I'll show I can't be beat.I'll drive you all around Birmingham and I won't go through a street."Said his lordship, "John you must be mad but still I will humour you.But remember that you lose your place the first street you go through."The mayor jumped in his carriage and the coachman on his seat.He then drove down Victoria Road which we know is not a street.Lozells Road, Villa Road - said his lordship, "What's his game?"And John drove into Soho Road and turned down Queen's Head Lane.Foundry Road and Slough Lane and Foundry Road he drivesAnd thus he keeps out of a street he astfully contrives.Winson Green and Icknield Port said his lordship, "Well, that's good."And John wheeled round the corner into Ladywood.Islington Row he next drives through said his lordship, "Now he's beat.For if you go straight on my man, you must go through Sun Street."But John said,"No, that will not do, for I have another mode."He then turned around from Lea Bank and into Ryland Road.Charlotte Road and Wellington Road, the coachman next drives through.Bristol Road and Belgrave Road away he quickly flew.Now we're into Moseley Road - said his lordship in a pet -"Dash my wig and barnacles, I think he'll do it yet."Highgate Place and Kyrwicks Lane and Aukland Road the same.Stratford Road up to the Ship and then down Sandy Lane.Coventry and Bordesley Green are roads that next they pass.Park Roa, Mill Lane, Saltley Road through the yard they make the gas.Then the Recreation Ground and on through Nechells Park.Holborn Road and Lichfield Road, said his lordship. "What a lark."Said John, "It's now Victoria Road and I think your lordship's had a treatFor I've driven all round the city and I've not been through a street."Author Unknown.

doare.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14765
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2012, 09:44:29 AM »
bugsy ,very good i suppose it can be adapted to any city,  O0 i googled it and here is what i got.

 
"You see things; you say, 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say 'Why not?” ....shaw..

doare.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14765
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2012, 09:47:02 AM »

 
 Title: Re: Know poem about Birmingham- no streets?
 Post by:  on Sunday 05 November 06 17:50 GMT (UK)
 The Lord Mayor had a coachman and the coachman's name was John.
Said his lordship to the coachman, "Take your wages and begone.
I want a better coachman, for I'm going to take a drive."
Said John, "I am the finest coachman you will find alive.
And if you let me drive today I'll show I can't be beat.
I'll drive you all around Birmingham and I won't go through a street."
Said his lordship, "John you must be mad but still I will humour you.
But remember that you lose your place the first street you go through."

The mayor jumped in his carriage and the coachman on his seat.
He then drove down Victoria Road which we know is not a street.
Lozells Road, Villa Road - said his lordship, "What's his game?"
And John drove into Soho Road and turned down Queen's Head Lane.
Foundry Road and Slough Lane and Foundry Road he drives
And thus he keeps out of a street he astfully contrives.

Winson Green and Icknield Port said his lordship, "Well, that's good."
And John wheeled round the corner into Ladywood.
Islington Row he next drives through said his lordship, "Now he's beat.
For if you go straight on my man, you must go through Sun Street."
But John said,"No, that will not do, for I have another mode."
He then turned around from Lea Bank and into Ryland Road.

Charlotte Road and Wellington Road, the coachman next drives through.
Bristol Road and Belgrave Road away he quickly flew.
Now we're into Moseley Road - said his lordship in a pet -
"Dash my wig and barnacles, I think he'll do it yet."
Highgate Place and Kyrwicks Lane and Aukland Road the same.
Stratford Road up to the Ship and then down Sandy Lane.

Coventry and Bordesley Green are roads that next they pass.
Park Roa, Mill Lane, Saltley Road through the yard they make the gas.
Then the Recreation Ground and on through Nechells Park.
Holborn Road and Lichfield Road, said his lordship. "What a lark."
Said John, "It's now Victoria Road and I think your lordship's had a treat
For I've driven all round the city and I've not been through a street."

Author Unknown.

According to Dr. Chinn, this poem was first published in the Evening Mail in 1895.

Note* Tis the first time I have read the poem all the way through...and....my Great Great Gramma lived on Sun St.!
"You see things; you say, 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say 'Why not?” ....shaw..

cannon

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1761
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2012, 10:30:53 AM »
anyone ever hear of a poem called "coachman john" i remember my da reciting some of it , it's about a coachman who is being made redundant because of his age he defends his abilities by pointing out (the poem) how he can take you all round belfast without going through a street, so avenues and places mews etc .
hi doare, can remember my mums' aunt who was like a grandma to me singing a song  about a coachman  'I'll take you all through Belfast and I wont go through a street".  Cannon

chi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43022
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2012, 02:51:04 PM »
Loved this poem. We had to stand up in
class and read it fast like we were on the
train
 
Quote
From a Railway Carriage
by Robert Louis Stevenson
 
Faster than fairies, faster than witches,
Bridges and houses, hedges and ditches;
And charging along like troops in a battle,
All through the meadows, the horses and cattle:
All of the sights of the hill and the plain
Fly as thick as driving rain;
And ever again, in the wink of an eye,
Painted stations whistle by.
Here is a child who clambers and scrambles,
All by himself and gathering brambles;
Here is a tramp who stands and gazes;
And there is the green for stringing the daisies!
Here is a cart run away on the road
Lumping along with man and load;
And here is a mill and there is a river:
Each a glimpse and gone for ever!
“Nobody can hurt me without my permission.”

Don't mistake my silence for ignorance, my calmness for acceptance, or my kindness  for weakness.

chi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43022
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2012, 02:55:14 PM »
“Nobody can hurt me without my permission.”

Don't mistake my silence for ignorance, my calmness for acceptance, or my kindness  for weakness.

chi

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 43022
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2012, 03:02:03 PM »
 
This poem reminds me of the teacher trying to get
a pair of tight fitting snow boots on one of her
Kindergarten children. After she finally struggled
and got the boots on,  the child said, "these are
not my boots". THe teacher struggled again and
took the boots off. Then the child said, "they're
my sisters. :D
 
 
 
Over the coming weeks I am hoping to post some poetry from my favourite Belfast Poet, Albert Haslett.  I have mentioned his poetry before on other threads.  These are from a signed book of his peoms called " Enjoy the Crack"
 
This one is about The Fight
 

“Nobody can hurt me without my permission.”

Don't mistake my silence for ignorance, my calmness for acceptance, or my kindness  for weakness.

kate.o

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2679
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2012, 12:51:13 PM »
all great poems evryone please keep them comeing  *

St.Anthony

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1608
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #13 on: May 07, 2012, 04:10:01 PM »

St.Anthony

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1608
Re: Poetry of Belfast life by Albert Haslett
« Reply #14 on: May 07, 2012, 04:11:03 PM »