Author Topic: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST  (Read 30814 times)

arder lavery

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HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« on: August 05, 2013, 11:45:42 AM »
 me first.
i met my beautiful girlfriend in the plaza when i was 16.
because i was from ardoyne and she was from the upper newtownards road.
we knew her parents would not approve of our relationship.
 i was playing soccer in london. when she wrote and told me that she was going to australia for two years.
well, i immediately got a clearance and quit my dream.
i went back to belfast and worked at different jobs to get some money for australia.
well, the night we left, going aboard the heysham boat, i was watching her family leaving her off and it broke my heart.
because in effect we were running away together.
i only had my da and cleeky clarke to say goodbye too.
but alas, 43 years on, we have a beautiful family and are still madly in love.
this of course is only part of my story, so tell me about yours, i would love to hear it
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Dommo

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2013, 04:49:46 PM »
me first.
i met my beautiful girlfriend in the plaza when i was 16.
because i was from ardoyne and she was from the upper newtownards road.
we knew her parents would not approve of our relationship.
 i was playing soccer in london. when she wrote and told me that she was going to australia for two years.
well, i immediately got a clearance and quit my dream.
i went back to belfast and worked at different jobs to get some money for australia.
well, the night we left, going aboard the heysham boat, i was watching her family leaving her off and it broke my heart.
because in effect we were running away together.
i only had my da and cleeky clarke to say goodbye too.
but alas, 43 years on, we have a beautiful family and are still madly in love.
this of course is only part of my story, so tell me about yours, i would love to hear it
After a year's unemplyment after college I got an awful "clerical assistant" job in the NICS. I was promised (warned) that if I stuck it out long enuff I could aspire to be a "box clerk".
So I took exams in Dublin for the Eire civil service until I was hired as an executive officer in the Revenue Commission. I got that job and moved to Dublin.  I have never looked back.
if yer gonna act the chivo, beware the chupacabra

Kateme

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2013, 07:53:39 PM »
My father couldn't get work in N. Ireland in the 50's.  He went to England and Wales to work and we saw him every six months.  In the meantime, my mother's brothers had come to New York and one of them claimed my Dad so that we could be together.  My mother and I joined him in New York in 1960 and I've been here ever since!  Sadly, both my parents are now deceased.  But, I did gain a sister after I arrived here!  :)
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tboy

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2013, 08:17:32 PM »
My father couldn't get work in N. Ireland in the 50's.  He went to England and Wales to work and we saw him every six months.  In the meantime, my mother's brothers had come to New York and one of them claimed my Dad so that we could be together.  My mother and I joined him in New York in 1960 and I've been here ever since!  Sadly, both my parents are now deceased.  But, I did gain a sister after I arrived here!  :)
Nice story Kateme, I remember waving goodbye to my older brother and his new bride (Eileen Mckillen from Crumlin Street) at Nutts Corner Airport as they headed off to America. My mother never really got over it.

Tipperdarby

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2013, 09:01:09 PM »
My father couldn't get work in N. Ireland in the 50's.  He went to England and Wales to work and we saw him every six months.  In the meantime, my mother's brothers had come to New York and one of them claimed my Dad so that we could be together.  My mother and I joined him in New York in 1960 and I've been here ever since!  Sadly, both my parents are now deceased.  But, I did gain a sister after I arrived here!  :)
I didn't know you had a sister!! How nice for you both. Does she live in New York State also.?

When I left Belfast in 1977 the Troubles were really bad.My sister and brother in law had emigrated to Calgary, Canada in May 1976. They were Catholic married to Protestant and it was a dodgy situation. A year later I was demented, I had 2 little boys and I didn't want them growing up in that atmosphere so my brother in law sponsored us and we arrived in Calgary May 1977. The first year was a nightmare, I now had a baby daughter as well, I missed my parents so much and every time I spoke someone would say "I beg your pardon, I didn't understand what you just said" then I would be told "oh, your accent is so cute" ..it drove me mad.  However, in Feb 1979 my parents and my youngest sister immigrated also. My sister Moira stayed in Ireland so we all missed her but, bless her, she visited very often which helped somewhat. I had nightmares about Belfast for many years but in 1992 my marriage broke up and I went for counselling. The counsellor just happened to be a man from Ireland and over the months that I saw him, out spilled all kinds of stuff about the Troubles. It was amazing how helpful it was. .look at me now, I am able to really enjoy the craic on the BF (I don't bother with the controversial threads though) I have been happily married  to a lovely French Canadian man for 18 years and, my former husband and I are friends again, we have 3 great kids together and 2 beautiful grandsons. Canadians still think my accent is cute but I don't mind that anymore. They also think I am very funny with some of my sayings!!
There, I have probably told Arder more than he wanted to know but, that's me, I don't know when to stop :D

RobRoy

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2013, 10:55:13 PM »
Tipperrdarby, what you didn't realise was you were your father's daughter. Eventually it dawned on you without you knowing from where the strength was springing.
Take another look at the photo which you posted of your dad sitting on his seamans chest and conversing with his comrades. I believe this is one of the greatest photos I have ever seen. He is the boddhi satva of all his shipmates. You were all born into a very special family.  RR

Moorfield Street

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2013, 11:48:03 PM »
Arder.     I left Nutt's Corner Airport, September 1964 to join a ship in Tobata, Japan, when they called out my name, people thought I was going to the Tokyo Olympics!
 
I was supposed to be home for Christmas 1964 but did not return to Belfast until 1971.  In the meantime, my ship was bare boat chartered to an Australian Company (BHP) who flew out my wife and 4 children to join me in Wollongong, Australia, in May, 1965 and lived here happy ever after.

Tipperdarby

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2013, 12:10:27 AM »
Tipperrdarby, what you didn't realise was you were your father's daughter. Eventually it dawned on you without you knowing from where the strength was springing.
Take another look at the photo which you posted of your dad sitting on his seamans chest and conversing with his comrades. I believe this is one of the greatest photos I have ever seen. He is the boddhi satva of all his shipmates. You were all born into a very special family.  RR
Now you have me crying RR. Thanks so much for those kind words. :-*   You know my Dad was such a quiet man and my Mom was very much the boss in our house. They adored each other and he went along with her wishes most of the time. However, you are right, my Dad had great strength, he was a survivor.....he was orphaned at 7 but he had such a positive attitude all his life. I am still getting strength from him because I feel his presence when I need him.
Thanks again, that was lovely of you.

cyprus girl

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2013, 01:22:39 AM »
Tipperrdarby, what you didn't realise was you were your father's daughter. Eventually it dawned on you without you knowing from where the strength was springing.
Take another look at the photo which you posted of your dad sitting on his seamans chest and conversing with his comrades. I believe this is one of the greatest photos I have ever seen. He is the boddhi satva of all his shipmates. You were all born into a very special family.  RR

Now you have me crying RR. Thanks so much for those kind words. :-*   You know my Dad was such a quiet man and my Mom was very much the boss in our house. They adored each other and he went along with her wishes most of the time. However, you are right, my Dad had great strength, he was a survivor.....he was orphaned at 7 but he had such a positive attitude all his life. I am still getting strength from him because I feel his presence when I need him.
Thanks again, that was lovely of you.
Tipper I am crying also, :girl_cray: what a lovely complement from RobRoy :-*
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Dommo

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2013, 01:55:44 AM »
Arder.     I left Nutt's Corner Airport, September 1964 to join a ship in Tobata, Japan, when they called out my name, people thought I was going to the Tokyo Olympics!
 
I was supposed to be home for Christmas 1964 but did not return to Belfast until 1971.  In the meantime, my ship was bare boat chartered to an Australian Company (BHP) who flew out my wife and 4 children to join me in Wollongong, Australia, in May, 1965 and lived here happy ever after.
What is "bare boat"?
if yer gonna act the chivo, beware the chupacabra

Moorfield Street

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2013, 03:36:56 AM »
Dommo.  Bareboat Charter means:-   The Ships Owners (in my case, Naess Denholm of Glasgow) leased the "Naess Clipper" to the Charters (B.H.P., Melbourne Australia), who changed the name to "Iron Clipper".  BHP then controlled the Technical Management and Commercial Operations.     BHP provided the Crew and all Operating Expenses.
 
It was a condition of the Charter that the Chief Engineer would remain on the ship until relieved.    I resigned from Denholms and joined BHP, after 6 months.
 
THe initial charter was for 5 years which was extended for another 5 years.

Dommo

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2013, 05:56:24 AM »
Dommo.  Bareboat Charter means:-   The Ships Owners (in my case, Naess Denholm of Glasgow) leased the "Naess Clipper" to the Charters (B.H.P., Melbourne Australia), who changed the name to "Iron Clipper".  BHP then controlled the Technical Management and Commercial Operations.     BHP provided the Crew and all Operating Expenses.
 
It was a condition of the Charter that the Chief Engineer would remain on the ship until relieved.    I resigned from Denholms and joined BHP, after 6 months.
 
THe initial charter was for 5 years which was extended for another 5 years.
thanks, I don't Know anything about how that works. Interesting  how you can get sent around the globe that way.
if yer gonna act the chivo, beware the chupacabra

arder lavery

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #12 on: August 06, 2013, 09:39:48 AM »
all beautiful replies, thank you
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Kateme

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #13 on: August 06, 2013, 07:52:18 PM »
I didn't know you had a sister!! How nice for you both. Does she live in New York State also.?

When I left Belfast in 1977 the Troubles were really bad.My sister and brother in law had emigrated to Calgary, Canada in May 1976. They were Catholic married to Protestant and it was a dodgy situation. A year later I was demented, I had 2 little boys and I didn't want them growing up in that atmosphere so my brother in law sponsored us and we arrived in Calgary May 1977. The first year was a nightmare, I now had a baby daughter as well, I missed my parents so much and every time I spoke someone would say "I beg your pardon, I didn't understand what you just said" then I would be told "oh, your accent is so cute" ..it drove me mad.  However, in Feb 1979 my parents and my youngest sister immigrated also. My sister Moira stayed in Ireland so we all missed her but, bless her, she visited very often which helped somewhat. I had nightmares about Belfast for many years but in 1992 my marriage broke up and I went for counselling. The counsellor just happened to be a man from Ireland and over the months that I saw him, out spilled all kinds of stuff about the Troubles. It was amazing how helpful it was. .look at me now, I am able to really enjoy the craic on the BF (I don't bother with the controversial threads though) I have been happily married  to a lovely French Canadian man for 18 years and, my former husband and I are friends again, we have 3 great kids together and 2 beautiful grandsons. Canadians still think my accent is cute but I don't mind that anymore. They also think I am very funny with some of my sayings!!
There, I have probably told Arder more than he wanted to know but, that's me, I don't know when to stop :D
Wow Tipper - it's a tough story but a wonderful one as well - all memories that are part of you.  I remember the troubles too and how frightened my grandparents were that one of their six sons would get hurt somehow.  I think it really took such a toll on them that they both died within a year of each other 1971-1972.  I'm sure we could write a book about what we've seen and heard! I was glad to come back to NY in 1972.   My sister Caroline (named after you know who) lives on the North Fork of Long Island - 1 1/2 hours away.  We see each other on Holidays mostly and talk on the phone!   :)
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arder lavery

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Re: HOW COME YOU LEFT BELFAST
« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2013, 11:00:02 AM »
although iv'e never heard of bare boat.
one day we were working on a sth african ship in the docks and they offered brian smith and manual quinn a job on board, supposidly for two weeks sailing to england and back. it was a short cut to getting your seamans book.
well, brian and manual had not been seen for over three months, they finally jumped ship and made thir way back to belfast, minus thier wages.
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