Author Topic: Sam McAughtry RIP  (Read 4209 times)

getzls

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 143
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #15 on: April 01, 2014, 01:14:41 AM »
Sinking of the Kenbane Head and McAughtrys War great reads, we've lost another great  :(

Yes the Sinking of the Kenbane Head is excellent and quite moving.
Think the other one was a bit too embellished.

Still, fine man he was.

Bigali

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17524
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2014, 01:22:12 AM »

Yes the Sinking of the Kenbane Head is excellent and quite moving.
Think the other one was a bit too embellished.

Still, fine man he was.

Mmmm not too sure about the RAF exploits being embellished having listened to tales from my Dads younger brother (my uncle obviously) about his exploits in the Far East , they have a curious similarity as is common with all service personnel who served during the war.
Support Soldier F Support Soldier B

The courageous deeds and sacrifices of the RUC and UDR must never be airbrushed from history .

GandT

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5989
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2014, 04:06:21 PM »
There was an article in the Belfast Telegraph of 1st April by a lady called Gail Walker. It is an interesting, thoughtful and thought-provoking piece on Sam McAughtry. I was always a fan of his stories and of what I heard of the man on radio and from other people.

I can't do the hyperlink thing on this but it is called 'McAughtry: a rare, articulate Protestant voice'. It raises some questions for all people but especially nationalists and republicans. Certainly made me think - just as Sam often did as well.

I am not sure that he would have seen his works and his views in quite the same way as Gail Walker does - but well worth a read.

GandT

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5989
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2014, 07:44:00 PM »
http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/opinion/columnists/gail-walker/sam-mcaughtry-a-rare-articulate-protestant-voice-30142084.html

Don't say I don't try and try to learn quickly. This is the article I was speaking of. Don't know how Sam would have viewed it but he would certainly have HAD views on it!

sonofshanks

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6890
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2014, 08:38:02 PM »

Mmmm not too sure about the RAF exploits being embellished having listened to tales from my Dads younger brother (my uncle obviously) about his exploits in the Far East , they have a curious similarity as is common with all service personnel who served during the war.

Think your right Bigali. I met Sam many, many times through Trade Unionism. He could talk all day with real life stories about his childhood, his war service, growing up in 'Gods Little Acre' and his Father, in whom he spoke fondly.
Think Sam could have written many, many more novels, from his real life experiences.
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

Sally Ann

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13272
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2014, 02:52:20 AM »
Having known and worked with Sam in NIPSA for many years, as a true Trade Unionist, I think it's a bit of an exaggeration to refer to him as the Voice of the Protestant People!

By virtue of the fact that we WERE staunch TU people - - - fighting for the good of all the workers - - - - no mater what Colour, Creed, Nationality etc., etc., - - - - - Religion, therefore, NEVER, NOR COULD EVER, enter into the equation!

To even bring Religion into it, is a dishonor to such a great man.

But then again, sadly, we are dealing with the narrow-minded people from here, who can't think beyond tribal mentality and the crap which attaches itself to the same! 

I also had the the good fortune to work along side of his daughter Elaine, in another Civil Service Dept. She, not only was a brilliant person and human being, but also (& quite rightly) thought the world of her Dad.

In conclusion, May Sam Rest In Peace.  - - - He did strive to obtain the same in life for this wee Country, so I Pray To God, that He finds the same in Death.

Sam, you were a fantastic person in life, May You Rest In Peace in death.

It was an honour to know you.
I only got drunk, I never got stupid!

sonofshanks

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6890
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2014, 01:03:53 PM »
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

sonofshanks

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6890
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2014, 01:25:11 PM »
I wanted to build a fortress, a bastion of invincibility.

GandT

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5989
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2014, 03:44:02 PM »
Quote
Having known and worked with Sam in NIPSA for many years, as a true Trade Unionist, I think it's a bit of an exaggeration to refer to him as the Voice of the Protestant People!

I agree with this which is why I said I wondered what Sam's views on the article would have been but was certain that he would have had views on it. Having re-read it, I am not so sure that Gail Walker characterises him as someone who consciously and clearly [or even subconsciously or vaguely] saw himself as an amplifier of a specific 'Protestant' and Unionist [capital P] philosophy or view.

I think what she is saying is that he was brought up in a Protestant / Unionist context and through that filter became one of several thinking, compassionate, socialist, non-sectarian trade unionists who came from the broadly Protestant / unionist tradition and were members of trade unions in tough times as well as of the Northern Ireland Labour Party and so on. This was not as easy position but a brave one and there were many such brave people who brought their world-view into unions with them. In turn they had that world-view broadened by education and participation in the working movement.

It is she who comes up with the question - she does not put it into his mouth - that if we think of the Sam McAughtry, Sam Thompson and James Ellis, Andrew Boyd, David Bleakley etc of this world and look at / try to crystallise and understand their views on 'Ireland' / NI can we ask certain things of Republicans / Nationalists? She seeks an answer as to how best we must / could / should / should have responded to accommodate men such as these. It's a damned good question and a very fair one!


GandT

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5989
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2014, 03:49:39 PM »
Sorry - just as an afterthought. Listened today to a very short bit of 'Talkback'. Wendy Austin was at the opening of the Sam Thompson Bridge - lovely to hear that. Michael Longley read a poem called simply 'The Poker' in memory of Sam since the latter had made it for him many years ago. The poem draws on imagery that relates some of the work of the Yard and some metalwork skills to how a poem / art itself is wrought in the same skilled manner - combination of gift and craft. It was lovely to hear and a perfect example of some of the best of our city - artist and craftsmen; engineer and poet; trade unionist and thinkers.

The two Sams would have enjoyed it immensely!

tboy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7629
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2014, 08:49:51 PM »
Yes you put it 'succinctly'  well done that man from the Tech. ;)

tboy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7629
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2014, 09:01:43 PM »
Anyone remember Norman Thompson who stood for NI Labour in North Belfast 1968, would there be a connection? tboy

TS77

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 81
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #27 on: April 25, 2014, 11:18:11 AM »
PLAY IT AGAIN SAM retrospective still on iplayer - up until Sunday and well worth a watch.
 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b007cwqh/Play_It_Again_Sam/

tboy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7629
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #28 on: April 25, 2014, 09:04:54 PM »
PLAY IT AGAIN SAM retrospective still on iplayer - up until Sunday and well worth a watch.
 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b007cwqh/Play_It_Again_Sam/
Yes well worth a watch, but saying that, Sam's books are better. :)

Sally Ann

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13272
Re: Sam McAughtry RIP
« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2014, 04:31:40 AM »
Sorry - just as an afterthought. Listened today to a very short bit of 'Talkback'. Wendy Austin was at the opening of the Sam Thompson Bridge - lovely to hear that. Michael Longley read a poem called simply 'The Poker' in memory of Sam since the latter had made it for him many years ago. The poem draws on imagery that relates some of the work of the Yard and some metalwork skills to how a poem / art itself is wrought in the same skilled manner - combination of gift and craft. It was lovely to hear and a perfect example of some of the best of our city - artist and craftsmen; engineer and poet; trade unionist and thinkers.

The two Sams would have enjoyed it immensely!

Ironically, when the BBC paid tribute to Jimmy Ellis, they covered how HE put his neck on the line - - so to speak - - - in putting on Sam Thompsons' play "Over the Bridge" - - -

Over the Bridge[edit]The stage play Over the Bridge, Thompson's best-known work, charts the tragic course of a sectarian dispute in the shipyard.[2][/sup][5][/sup] Thompson offered the play to James Ellis, then director of the Ulster Group Theatre, early in 1958, reportedly saying "I got a play you wouldn't touch with a bargepole!"[2][/sup][4][/sup] Ellis accepted it, and rehearsals had already started for a production in April 1959 when the theatre's Board of Directors headed byJ. Ritchie McKee refused to produce the play, criticising it in the Belfast Telegraph as "full of grossly vicious phrases and situations which would undoubtedly offend and affront every section of the public" and stating "It is the policy of the directors of the Ulster Group Theatre to keep political and religious controversies off our stage."[2][/sup] Ellis and many actors of the Ulster Group Theatre resigned to form their own company,[2][/sup] and Thompson successfully sued the Board for breach of contract.[2][/sup][3][/sup][/size]
Over the Bridge finally opened at the Empire Theatre in Belfast on 26 January 1960, directed by Ellis and starring J. G. Devlin, Joseph Tomelty and Harry Towb; Thompson played one of the minor roles.[2][/sup][5][/sup] It was highly successful, with an estimated total audience of 42,000 people during the six-week run, far greater than had attended any play in the city previously.[2][/sup] On tour, Over the Bridge enjoyed considerable success inDublin and Glasgow, and also played in Edinburgh, Brighton and the London West End.[2][/sup][4][/sup] The play was later adapted for television by Granada with additional material by Hugh Leonard[6][/sup] and for radio by BBC Belfast.[7][/sup]
Ten years after its production, Sam Hanna Bell wrote that "at last the unclean spirit of sectarianism had been dragged before the floodlights and examined with passion, pity and corrosive laughter".[2][/sup] Later critics also consider the play to have been ground-breaking; James McAleavey considers Over the Bridge and the controversy surrounding its staging to be "a landmark in the cultural history of Northern Ireland and ... prophetic of the Troubles to follow;"[4][/sup] Michael Parker describes it as "a potent example of a text which illuminates the condition of the culture that frames it" and adds "the story of its reception provides incontrovertible evidence of the unease within the Unionist establishment during this period;"[2][/sup] while Lance Pettitt calls the play "a powerful indictment of the failure of labour politics against religious fundamentalism".[1][/sup][/font][/size]
Thompson's second stage play, The Evangelist (1963) is based on the religious revival in Ulster of 1859[8][/sup] and focuses on the exploitation of evangelism; it proved neither as controversial nor as successful as Over the Bridge.[4][/sup][/font][/size]
I only got drunk, I never got stupid!