Author Topic: Inclusive Celebrations  (Read 1244 times)

Christopher

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Inclusive Celebrations
« on: July 23, 2006, 09:27:02 PM »
Does anyone know what inclusive means please ??? Would it be possible if a few important matters were excluded a thing could still be inclusive? I'm talking about the Twelfth Celebrations in Belfast. My attention was drawn to the question of things being inclusive in an article by Lynda Gilby in the "Sunday Life" dated 16th July. Apparently in their wisdom the Belfast Welcome Centre mentioned in their promotional material for the event that the Celebrations were inclusive and would attract many overseas visitors. I am sure the overseas visitors are wondering what inclusive means too :D Excluded, on this occasion in our "Brighter, Better Belfast" were open shops, cafes and restaurants where a weary, hot and bothered, footsore visitor deafened by the sound of the "blood and thunder Kick the Pope" drummers (it's a real pleasure to listen to the racket you make, lads. Which particular maestro taught you to play those things?) could sit down for some refreshment. Essential matters such as relieving the stress on one's bladder were on the exclusion list too. Lynda advised tourists intending to watch next year's event to bring sandwiches, a flask and a folding stool. Seem a reasonable idea. How about a rug and wide mouthed receptacle for the ladies when nature calls. The guys are OK they can use the nearest walls.   

EllCee

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Re: Inclusive Celebrations
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2006, 10:04:31 PM »
Perhaps out City Fathers need to go on a junket to learn how other cities cater for visitors.  Ye'know, how they ensure restaurants, cafes, shops, toilets, and all other facilities that visitors need to use throughout the 24 hours of every day are made available.

I read this elsewhere:

Environment-conscious tourists are said to be going for Green holidays.

As for Orange holidays, and the boost that the Twelfth is said to provide to the local economy, the city of Belfast was deserted on July 12 this year, as every other year.

An American tourist told the BBC that the Tourist Board Office was closed. It transpired that the office was not actually shut. It was just that the doors were closed, and you had to knock to get in.


Tourists have to be earned, they are not a "right" under the GFA.  There's precious little for visitors to do anyway.  Why do we have to make it difficult?
"I may not agree with you, but I respect your opinion"   "You cannot multiply wealth by dividing it"

Christopher

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Re: Inclusive Celebrations
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2006, 10:21:39 PM »
We have an attraction, the Twelfth,  that should bring tourists in their hoards ... what do we do .. shut everything down. No room at the inn. Belfast businesses involved in the B&B trade, catering trade, hotel industry, and pub trade .. never mind cafes, coffee shops and restaurants are rolling in it ... they must be otherwise why shut everything down and drive the tourists away in July. Maybe they have shares in the industry in the south of Ireland where they can charge the tourists a lot more money.

Word of mouth does a whole lot of harm guys. Think about it ... so many people from Belfast take their annual holiday in the month of July. They head for the sun. What do they do there? Meet other holidaymakers. I imagine the conversation goes something like this .. "Is that an Irish accent I hear?" "Yes"  "Where in Ireland do you live" "Belfast" "I've heard a lot about Belfast. I'd love to go there sometime, when is the best time to go there." It is not too hard to guess the reply "Not in the month of July. That's why we holiday here"