Author Topic: Stories from the Great War  (Read 3066 times)

eastbelfastbabe

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Stories from the Great War
« on: February 25, 2015, 06:16:54 PM »
 One City Hall event to tell ‘Hidden Stories’ of World War
Belfast City Hall next week is hosting a special event which will recall the hidden stories and forgotten narratives of the First World War.On Thursday on 5th March at 7pm, renowned local historians Tom Hartley and Philip Orr will look at what life was like in Belfast a century ago, and particularly for those left behind while thousands of people from the island of Ireland took part in the Great War raging across Europe and beyond.
Among the forgotten stories they will tell will be those of food shortages and the strange new recipes women were told to try to make ends meet. They also will look at the women who worked, in very dangerous conditions, making high explosive shells for the front, as well as recount tales of German spies watching the shipyards from the top of Cavehill and U Boats sinking ships at the mouth of Belfast Lough.
The event, part of the Council’s ‘Decade of Centenaries’ programme, takes place at the City Hall next Thursday (March 5), starting at 6.30pm. It is free of charge but booking is essential.

To reserve a place, call 9027 0663 or email [email protected].
Good Relations Unit
Health and Environmental Services
Belfast City Council
City Hall
Belfast
BT1 5GS
Email: [email protected]
Tel: 02890 270663

Bigali

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2015, 11:07:51 PM »
Sorry I missed that , if ever you get the chance to get the hold of a copy of 'The Road To The Somme ' by Phillp Orr grab it, it is a priceless account of interviews carried out by Orr with Somme veterans when he realised that there very few left and their stories hadn't been told . I think it's out of print now, I lent my original copy to a ' friend' when I lived in Limavady,  then moved from the area and never got it back. I managed to locate a copy on Amazon and I had to pay £50 for it but I felt it was worth it.
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eastbelfastbabe

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2015, 11:21:51 PM »
I couldn't go but I heard it was a very good night. I just might that book. My husband had lots of books on both the WW1 and WW11.
Haven't sorted them out yet.

Jimbo67

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2015, 07:29:17 PM »
Some kind soul managed to record the event and post it on YouTube. Well worth a look.

Timmo

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2015, 09:35:15 PM »
http://blackstaffpress.com/product/the-road-to-the-somme/

Try this link. It is a fantastic book. I remember one of the veterans he interviewed said that he wouldn't let his dog join the British Army. He also related stories about how some of those men were treated by officers and such like. But the best part of it was that it was the men's stories in their own words. Well worth getting.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Orange-Green-Khaki-Regiments-1914-18/dp/0717119947

This is also another great read of that period. Well researched and written.
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Bigali

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2015, 09:56:00 PM »
See post #2 , and whilst I have no doubt that the Army of that time was a very different one from today because of class divisions etc I have immediate and other relatives who served in the armed forces and their sxperiences, while at times dangerous and sad , are positive ones .
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The courageous deeds and sacrifices of the RUC and UDR must never be airbrushed from history .

Timmo

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2015, 10:28:09 PM »
See post #2 , and whilst I have no doubt that the Army of that time was a very different one from today because of class divisions etc I have immediate and other relatives who served in the armed forces and their sxperiences, while at times dangerous and sad , are positive ones .

I surmise you have posted this as some sort of counteract about my post. Fair enough. Let me expand.

I had three relatives who served in WW1 including my grandfather who survived. His brother didn't and his cousin didn't make it back either. He from what I recall didn't have any positive experiences to pass on to our family. Which is strange when you consider he only served at the The Somme and Ginchy, and Guillemont. Believe me I have no wish to upset this great thread but the only positive thing to be said about that conflict is that it ended before there was no one left to fight.

As for Philip Orr's book it is a fantastic read as I pointed out because it put paid to the drivel that some of the others who wrote books about the men from here who served. Books like Cyril Falls and Frank Percy Crozier's trash book about his so called experiences of daring do in WW1. This is the rat who sent a young lad from the Shankill to his death who he had personally made a promise to the kids mother he would look after him. Well he did, the coward had the kid shot. Not much positivity to report there.
Before you laugh at someone else, have a look in the mirror.

Bigali

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2015, 11:18:26 PM »
I surmise you have posted this as some sort of counteract about my post. Fair enough. Let me expand.

I had three relatives who served in WW1 including my grandfather who survived. His brother didn't and his cousin didn't make it back either. He from what I recall didn't have any positive experiences to pass on to our family. Which is strange when you consider he only served at the The Somme and Ginchy, and Guillemont. Believe me I have no wish to upset this great thread but the only positive thing to be said about that conflict is that it ended before there was no one left to fight.

As for Philip Orr's book it is a fantastic read as I pointed out because it put paid to the drivel that some of the others who wrote books about the men from here who served. Books like Cyril Falls and Frank Percy Crozier's trash book about his so called experiences of daring do in WW1. This is the rat who sent a young lad from the Shankill to his death who he had personally made a promise to the kids mother he would look after him. Well he did, the coward had the kid shot. Not much positivity to report there.

No counteract at all I was merely pointing out the fact I had posted about the book .

As for Frank Crozier there is no doubt whatsoever that he was a Martinet and a pompous and egocentric ass , vis a vis his book Men I Have Killed , I suspect mental health problems there, however I think you are overlooking compassionate officers like John Leslie Stewart - Moore to give one example, caught a sentry sleeping ,a dereliction of duty which carried the death sentence , instead Moore gave the sentry such a rocket hoping that it woul deter the man from ever doing such a thing again.

I feel for your relatives who served at the Somme and the like I really do , as a small child growing up in a small rural town in the early sixties I remember what now seems a disproportionate amount of elderly men for such a small town walking about with the Thousand Yard Stare or gibbering to themselves , when I asked my father what was wrong with them the answer was always "Oh he was at the Somme" .  I now know that this was to use the old parlance,  shell shock or as its called today PTSD , these men were never treated or given support.

I agree with you in that the working class volunteer squaddie , and let's not forget that in Ireland they were ALL volunteers, no conscription here, were treated abominably , however times have changed and that is why my relatives have a positive experience of the armed forces.

I don't understand why you are being so prickly.

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The courageous deeds and sacrifices of the RUC and UDR must never be airbrushed from history .

Timmo

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2015, 04:31:17 PM »

No counteract at all I was merely pointing out the fact I had posted about the book .

As for Frank Crozier there is no doubt whatsoever that he was a Martinet and a pompous and egocentric ass , vis a vis his book Men I Have Killed , I suspect mental health problems there, however I think you are overlooking compassionate officers like John Leslie Stewart - Moore to give one example, caught a sentry sleeping ,a dereliction of duty which carried the death sentence , instead Moore gave the sentry such a rocket hoping that it woul deter the man from ever doing such a thing again.

I feel for your relatives who served at the Somme and the like I really do , as a small child growing up in a small rural town in the early sixties I remember what now seems a disproportionate amount of elderly men for such a small town walking about with the Thousand Yard Stare or gibbering to themselves , when I asked my father what was wrong with them the answer was always "Oh he was at the Somme" .  I now know that this was to use the old parlance,  shell shock or as its called today PTSD , these men were never treated or given support.

I agree with you in that the working class volunteer squaddie , and let's not forget that in Ireland they were ALL volunteers, no conscription here, were treated abominably , however times have changed and that is why my relatives have a positive experience of the armed forces.

I don't understand why you are being so prickly.

I am not being anything. I am defending the ordinary men from anywhere who were in that conflict. There are too many revisionists coming out iof the woodwork especially with the anniversary pending, some of who are trying to play down both the disastrous leadership of the British Ruling Class Generals and in some cases casting doubt on what those men were put through. Included in this I put the officers who served in the trenches who also took a hell of a slaughter.

Not so long ago one so called historian actually said that most of the men only went over the top 4 times during the whole of the war. A statement that is beyond disgrace. It completely ignored the fact that whilst in the trenches they were under muderous shelling. But my thoughts about this are that I would have loved to see the fool go over the top once to see how that fitted his assertion.

I'm also against some of the shows in the last while trying to rewrite the history of some of the biggest idiots to be put in charge of brave men. One in particular Henry Rawlinson a complete and total waste of space the butcher of the Somme. Who instead of being held to account for murder got promoted and it would seem now a hundred years later being revised to take the bad smell of him. But he is not alone. One of many.  :comando:
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Sally Ann

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Re: Stories from the Great War
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2015, 03:27:25 AM »
I am not being anything. I am defending the ordinary men from anywhere who were in that conflict. There are too many revisionists coming out iof the woodwork especially with the anniversary pending, some of who are trying to play down both the disastrous leadership of the British Ruling Class Generals and in some cases casting doubt on what those men were put through. Included in this I put the officers who served in the trenches who also took a hell of a slaughter.

Not so long ago one so called historian actually said that most of the men only went over the top 4 times during the whole of the war. A statement that is beyond disgrace. It completely ignored the fact that whilst in the trenches they were under muderous shelling. But my thoughts about this are that I would have loved to see the fool go over the top once to see how that fitted his assertion.

I'm also against some of the shows in the last while trying to rewrite the history of some of the biggest idiots to be put in charge of brave men. One in particular Henry Rawlinson a complete and total waste of space the butcher of the Somme. Who instead of being held to account for murder got promoted and it would seem now a hundred years later being revised to take the bad smell of him. But he is not alone. One of many.  :comando:

Sadly, ain't that the truth!?  :(
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