Author Topic: remembering wee mcdonnell street  (Read 3025 times)

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #30 on: February 15, 2019, 09:15:31 PM »
Fred and Herbie behind the counter in the pawn in McDonnell Street .  Herbie was the softer option if you were negotiating a deal.  Old brown coat overalls and a smell of old clothes permeated the atmosphere with little partitions at the counter to keep your business private.  Provident cheque purchases quickly pawned for cash in hand.  Today's equivalent of pay day loans. Mum used to surepticiously wait and browse to get Herbie for a deal instead of Fred as you got a shilling more. Still have the old brownie 127 camera dad bought in the pawn to take pics. Got my first pair of football boots there as well. You got a pink ticket for items pawned and 7 days to redeem as far as i remember but could be longer. Everything from suitcases to suits hanging up with a long pole to retrieve items. And best of all it was 30 yards from the front door and the gable wall was great for handball.
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Falls

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #31 on: February 16, 2019, 02:10:37 PM »
Eilish Nelson had a shoe shop on leeson street close to McDonnell Street,and Moss' shop nearby.I remember being sent to Moss' by Mr.Magee (teacher) to purchase a cane.Miss Moss was a teacher at St.Kevins,who I remember fondly before I entered St.Josephs slate street.I have nice memories of slate street from 59 to 63.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #32 on: February 16, 2019, 02:30:35 PM »
I Items pawned were called pledges  , the money given was recorded in a code on each article before it was put away  My Father knew the code at The West End Loan Office as he had worked there as a teenager this meant he knew how to get a good deal when making a purchase although it usually was my Mother who did the actual haggling . I also remember Moss's shop  but late 40s canes were bought at Greenwoods in Leeson ST and they got plenty of use in  Slate St school    even on very young children '

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2019, 05:20:12 PM »
Yes I was sent to stinker Greenwoods for a cane in the late 50's by a Slate Street teacher.  Sara Moss's shop was opposite the  openin (waste ground) off Cyprus Street or Cyper Street as the kids called. Used to have to go and get 2ozs of Millikins snuff in a paper poke for a neighbour at Sarah Moss's shop.  Funny though I was never asked to show proof of age as an 8 year old buying this tobacco product. Although my dad once sent a small neighbours boy (Richard McCurdy) to Soapie Trainor's shop in McDonnell Street for 20 Park Drive cigarettes and when asked who they were for he said they were for Prince McBride's daddy (Prince was our dog).  Bernie was Soapie or more properly Sophie Trainor's daughter and relayed this story to my dad on his next visit.  Matty McCrorys shop close by as well as well as was  Larry McCausland's further up McDonnell Street,  No Tescos or Asda in those days to attract customers buying their rations.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2019, 06:32:01 PM »
Soapie Trainors was the shop and sixpence worth of Millikens scented the choice of snuff for an old lady,I called Granny but was not related in any way the snuff was weighed out with a tiny scoop I into the paper "poke"no ID needed for an eight year old and unlike cigarettes no child would have been tempted to try it as it was horrible 

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #35 on: February 17, 2019, 11:44:34 AM »
There was practically a shop on every adjacent corner. Davy Connolly's in Granville Street.  There was one at Ward Street .  Taylors on the Grosvenor Road. sold delicious orange ice lollies  Then there were some house shops.  Lizzy Stranney's rings a bell. An Old favourite was Leo Lambes in Albert Street who had kids toys in the window. And off course there were travelling sales opportunities like a fish hand cart that used to come round on Fridays and shouts of "coal breek"as well are rememembered.  And before green bin days a guy called old Haigy used to come round in a horse drawn cart shouting "Any Refuse" i.e. callecting vegetable peelings for the pigs.  Probably wouldn't pass agricultural standards today but the bacon tasted better in those days.


Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #36 on: February 17, 2019, 07:45:31 PM »
My friend called for me , she was going to Matty Mc Crorys in Servia St and had three pence to spend As her companion I would get a share of the purchase which turned out to be four slices of luncheon meat  we ate them on our way back to Mc Donnell St we knew how to get our vitamins back then

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #37 on: February 17, 2019, 08:39:21 PM »
On the subject of cooked meats you couldn't beat sliced cooked ham from Robert Graham's on the Grosvenor Road.  Memory tells me he had a an advertising pig in the window as well. 

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #38 on: February 18, 2019, 08:47:39 PM »
Robert Graham sold very good bacon and ham his own tomatoes and jam his shop was always clean and tidy  The Festive Season was marked by him placing in the window a novelty which drew lots of children  I'm not sure how it worked but a very realistic looking Mother pig wearing a butcher's apron scrubbed a small piglet sitting in a wooden bathtub with a large brush . This was only brought out at Christmas and no other decoration adorned the window Like most of the old grocers he always gave a small "Christmas Box " to his regular customers

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #39 on: February 18, 2019, 10:14:43 PM »
Pig in the window memories for Christmas are as beautifully  described. Think Robert even wore an apron like the pig.  But I seem to remember Robb's window Castle Junction as a Christmas treat as well. And talking of local shops Mrs Curran's and John's fish shops on the Grosvenor Road with potted herns. Oh the taste lingers on. Broken biscuits at the Maypole Dairy and custard buns from Cowan's.  Spoiled? yes please.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #40 on: February 19, 2019, 07:20:18 PM »
O'Hagen I believe was Haigys name and when we had missed his collection a couple,of times I was persuaded by my Mother to take the waste food to Henry  Kanes yard I think it was located near Moss's shop my recollection is of a fire with a huge cooking pot on it and the aroma from this cauldron mingled with that of the creatures waiting for their dinner was not appetizing  The Man gave me back the empty bucket and I made a hasty exit down Cyprus St    It didn't put me "off : bacon and I,think it did taste better then almost seventy years ago

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #41 on: February 19, 2019, 09:04:09 PM »
I think haigy used to give kids around the block rides on a little jaunting car arrangement.  Also remember getting a ride on a huge cart horse or shire horse driven by the unusally named Fred Palumbo.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #42 on: February 20, 2019, 07:49:33 PM »
Haigy was only one of the regular callers in wee  Mc Donnell St The call of "Any oul regs jam pots or bottles " sent children running home to get old clothes and empty jars  in exchange they would be given a balloon , a paper flag, or an umbrella made from wallpaper  The,coal breek man  , one who sold bleach (bring your own bottle,) Friday fish man  buttermilk carried in churns,on a cart and bread,and,milk delivered to your door,There,was also a man who stood in the,street,on Saturday morning and,played,the tin whistle,He,was very good and,after some,tunes ranging from "Hail Queen Of Heaven " to The  Wearing  O The Green  he would have a collection  Saturday afternoon he would be on the other side of the Grosvenor Rd and  The tunes were certainly not the same  But he sure knew how to "work " an audience

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #43 on: February 21, 2019, 09:34:43 PM »
And don't forget the penny a ride hobby horse of Mickey Marley fame.  For religious entertainment there was the processions with the silver band and I seem to remember the silver circle.  Was it an early form of lottery approved by the church?.  As an ex altar boy I remember the winter of 63 and trudging up McDonnell Street in above knee deep snow towards St Peters for the first mass.  The altar boys got to ring the big church bells (solemnly of course).  Quasimodo eat your heart out. Still remember the latin from the mass and an altar boy called Colum McAleese setting his lacy surplus on fire from a a candle held on a long pole arrangement in front of his chest at a funeral service. Wasn't a dignified send off for the deceased as it elicited a bit of bad language
and a lot of adult intervention to bring the flames under control.  Happily the surplus was the only casualty.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #44 on: February 22, 2019, 07:14:55 PM »
An event logged in my memory,also occured in St Peters church My confirmation,in 1950, This took place in March,and at,night,! We were instructed to attend at St Josephs School Slate St at6.30 pm and then clad in white dresses and veils walked with our sponsors to the church the boys wore short pants and it was freezing, Parents did not attend, and the,church was full  with just children and their sponsers  The service , each child confirmed and Bishops sermon took best part of,three hours,We emerged Strong and perfect Christians, ? Into the cold dark night and walked,home Why it took place,at night may have been that a lot of sponsers worked for the same employers and couldn't go "en masse asking for the day off work and they would also have lost a days pay