Author Topic: remembering wee mcdonnell street  (Read 4271 times)

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #75 on: March 14, 2019, 09:53:55 PM »
Much appreciated info outside forum regarding the family mentioned. Got me wondering about other characters who were around in the 50s. My memory tells me there was an eccentric character called paddy (the divils in ya) who was a gentle soul and I rememember him being given pride of place in what we referred to as my grannies chair in our house in wee McDonnell Street. Said chair chair still exists having had about ten coats of paint removed from it and now resides in our spare bedroom and still used today in its old natural wood state. Chair had very short legs as Iím led to believe my granny was quite small. Donít think it would fetch much on the antiques road show but as they always say itís priceless as as a family heirloom.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #76 on: March 15, 2019, 07:47:53 PM »
I remember that poor man He was partially blind  and a very talented harmonica player  We had a concert one day in our house Paddy playing and children from the  street,singing along  Jimmy Duffin was a regular,visitor staring in the windows  and muttering about " The Black And Tans "  Also  a lady who made almost daily forays to Roden St barracks for the " Peelers "   usually,for one,of her neighbours   Another character,was,the,lady who dressed head to toe,in green   She boarded the bus,I was on heading up The Grosvenor Rd  and coming,near Roden St produced and started waving A Tricolour  Bad Timing   the driver stopped the bus, sent for "The,Peelers " and still waving her flag  the Green Lady was arrested  And that,chair  I am almost,certain it only became  your Granny's when someone else vacated, it,in 1937  It's  lovely to look at things like that and remember their  history  I have a little table  that belonged  to my Husbands  Grandmother, when she lived in North Thomas,St,  almost 100, years ago 

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #77 on: March 15, 2019, 09:08:27 PM »
Talking about Roden Street Barracks reminds me that as kids we used to get chased by the police for playing football in the streets.  One friend was caught and I remember him telling me that he had his name written on the blotting paper by the desk sergeant in a very formal manner before his release.  Another childhood memory is my father calling a patrolling policeman over to reprimand me for lighting a small fire with waste paper in the gutter.  I was terrified of the implications as described by the policeman.  My arsonist tendencies curbed forever. And of course there was always the outdoor Mays market with everything under the sun e.g. seem to remember cattle in pens and vegetables of every type for sale.  And as kids we walked there through the city centre.  My favourite shop was Woolworths' where you could get an airfix kit for a few pence or sample the pick an mix sweet counter. There's a great song by Nancy Griffiths about Wollworth's with a speaking intro that's well worth a nostalgic listen.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #78 on: March 16, 2019, 05:01:08 PM »
It was not unusual in years gone by to see cattle driven past Mc Donnell St down the Grosvenor Rd probably to the abattoir or the,docks Kids would join in with,the drovers, quite a hazardous operation on a busy road lined with shops,and always a risk an animal would break rank Apart from that there was plenty of livestock kept in and around the wee streets  , horses donkeys pigs and goats  and,I think some cows in a yard,in Leeson St People kept ferrets , pigeons and the Granny,who made the gingerbread had hens in her back yard  The goats were also kept in Leeson St and once in a while would break out to have a great time going,into people's halls chewing the mats and tearing wallpaper as well as leaving their "calling card " 

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #79 on: March 17, 2019, 05:42:08 PM »
Happy St Patrick's day.  Was always a contest to see who had biggest bunch of Shamrock among kids.  Some ended up looking like a walking tree.  And of course there was always an emphasis on wearing something green. Girls with ribbons and boys with anything from ties to socks.  And then there was the Hail Glorious St Patrick hymn in church.  As you were saying about the various menageries kept locally it reminded me of a trip in connection with a job I once had where I met an individual who kept chickens in his living room using empty crisp boxes as chicken roosts.  The convenient little hole in the front of the box for access etc. Knew it was very unhygienic but the owner told me he still got lots of eggs thanks to Tayto. And talking of Tayto reminds me that my wife and I used to take said crisps on holiday in the 80s and beyond for a taste of home. In Wee McDonnell Street food was plain and simple and I have to say there was a preference given the economic constraints for what was tasty and inexpensive.  Remember Liver and Onions featured prominently as did vegetable roll.  Never could get a taste for tripe though.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #80 on: March 17, 2019, 10:11:25 PM »
St Patrick's Day marked here with a small parade  and was watched by people of many different nations and countries  Adults,and children alike wearing green and enjoying the happy atmosphere   I seem to remember as a child it was a day we could break our Lenten resolutions and eat sweets     We certainly didn't get as many treats as children get today and  Don't recall ever being asked "What would you like for your dinner "      Still have good memories of Vegetable Roll  Veda Bread Home made chicken and pea soup Paris buns and treacle farls   I have a friend who has lived in America since 1962 They have Irish shops there where you can buy Taytos Cadburys Chocolate  Irish tea  etc but when she comes to Belfast has to have buns from local bakery   and says they are unique to N Ireland  One memory of Mc Donnell St cuisine is of a very tasty sort of soup with onions made from a pigs tail    not ever picky about food but    no   not tripe

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #81 on: March 19, 2019, 09:12:58 PM »
We ordered an oxtail from the butcher last year as the intention was to make soup.  Sadly it's still in the freezer.  But my taste buds crave for a custard bun. That was a real treat as were haystacks and sore heads and German biscuits.  Oh cant fail to mention currant squares or flies graveyards as they were called and of course the the pastry convection that involved a bun with cream and two wings stuck in it but cannot remember the name looks a bit like a sisters of charity hat and bet that brings back memories.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #82 on: March 20, 2019, 04:45:10 PM »
Still remember the custard buns and whipped ice cream from Woolworths they were a great,treat  Directly,across,from Mc Donnell St on the Grosvenor Rd was Cowans Bakery  beautiful pastries baps,and farls but these I recall were strictly,a weekend luxury and the more ordinary Paris ,,Sorehead currantsquares and diamonds were the buns for the wee cups of,tea usually after the,dinner Any time I was sent to buy these confections it was,always with strict instructions not to purchase them from "SoapyTrainors " this  was a very small,shop and in close proximity to paraffin oil and large bars of SUNLIGHT AND LIFEBOY   soap,for laundry sat the uncovered buns and bread infiltrated with other odours,unknown in a bakery ,After Cowans the bakery became O Haras 

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #83 on: March 20, 2019, 04:51:53 PM »
PS The connection between  the Sisters of Charity with the large hats and buns with wings both sometimes called Butterflys " 

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #84 on: March 21, 2019, 07:56:51 PM »
Yes butterfly buns rings a bell.   No sell buy dates with small shops so you took your chances in those days.  Off course there were fresh deliveries of milk courtesy of Eddie Brown from Slate Street (who also supplied the kids milk in the school) and there was fresh bread from the well known bakery vans (electric well before their time) with roll out drawers at the back.  The lady next door to us had a lifelong work record with Kinehans or Lyle and Kinehans so we got free lemonade for years as a perk of her services there.  But I remember stories of her working in bare feet in cold water so the lemonade was well earned.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #85 on: March 22, 2019, 06:05:55 PM »
MY Godmother and her sister were placed in Nazereth House childrens home when their widowed Mother was unable to support them  They went straight to employment when they left the home and my Godmother spent all her working life in Lyle and Kinihans mineral water factory  This I think was in Lady St    and my memory of it is a rather grim place  noisy machinery and wet and cold I don't know about people working in their bare feet but the women workers in  the 1950s wore things called clogs to keep their feet dry We always got a few bottles of different flavours minerals every week I  I remember  raspberry and appleade  American cream soda and sarsparilla    The workers in spite,of their dreary surroundings were cheerful and friendly  Probably grateful to have a job in the tough years after the war

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #86 on: March 23, 2019, 09:53:18 PM »
Remember a story about 141 where when rent was demanded old Mrs Ralph used to respond with the cry from the collector "Rent " she would reply "Spent"and I remember a Mr Allen who used to collect insurance money.  Wore a distinctive insurance outfit e.g. shirt tie raincoat and very 50s  hat. Have vague memories of street parties but what we celebrating remains obscure. Think that there was a lot of street competition between kids from local area e.g. lots of yard brush waving at each other. But best of all is is the memories of kids games where it was a question of for girls skipping songs (sometimes boys joined in) Hi lo dolly pepper etc. We had KDRF kick door run fast and kick the can (popular now politically) and favourite was scotch where you threw a tennis ball at each other in a game of tag. Not many street games played today.


Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #87 on: March 24, 2019, 01:27:48 PM »
Many memories of street games and how children called their friends out to play by standing at the door and singing out the name of their chosen companion   1950 I was eight years old called for my friend to invite her to my  "Birthday Tea "  Her Mother said she could attend and would bring her own 'porringer "' This was a small tin cup children used  before the advent of plastic breakers and they couldn't be trusted with the "delph " No bouncy castles  , magicians  or nail painting  just a small cake jelly ice cream and thanks to Lyle and Kinahan plenty of lemonade  During the festivities the "porringer " was requested to be filled many many times with different kinds of minerals   This eventually caused a damper on the celebrations in more ways than one The "porringer " owner had to make a hasty exit back home and my Mother was busy for a while mopping up  the kitchen floor What went in certainly came out 

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #88 on: March 25, 2019, 10:11:04 PM »
On the subject of kids games remember "Nelson in the army" although with hindsight should have been navy.  And one two three red light.  And of course queenio queenio who's got the ballio.  Definitely something missing from today's kids lifestyle. Oh and the gable walls represented great hand ball arenas but remember the dividing line of the gable and someones back yard was a challenge.  Stinker Greenwood must have made a fortune in hand ball replacement.  And the girls singing I call in etc in the skipping song. Ropes around lamp posts making improvised swings and rounders a sort of baseball type game. Today's children probably prefer tv games with a handset but definitely a fitter generation in the 50s despite the food.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #89 on: March 26, 2019, 06:12:52 PM »
Gymnastics classes are very popular with children , They are not too expensive and after about ten lessons most kids can do handstands,  cartwheels  and crab walk all things we did seventy years ago in "wee Mc Donnell St " almost every day  A big skipping rope turned by two people taught us timing "miss the rope you are out   I o  "  hand / eye  coordination was perfected playing ball at  the gable wall of Toughers Pawn and "speeling ing " up lampposts  to fix the rope for a swing  , whipping a peerie  up and down the street   and walking everywhere kept us fit (and lean )   Today's children are "Tech " savvy from a very young age, , but would they be able to negotiate the hazards of The Dunville Park Springfield Dam  or hiking,up the Mountain Loney to the Hatchet Field   The wee streets were our home and we were streetwise kids  left a lot of,the time to our own devices  Different times not much in material terms but rich in freedom to roam and play