Author Topic: remembering wee mcdonnell street  (Read 4270 times)

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #90 on: March 26, 2019, 06:27:13 PM »
P.S. If any of my twelve year old grandchildren announced they were hiking up a mountain  with just,other,children I would probably suffer cardiac arrest !!!   

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #91 on: March 27, 2019, 10:38:42 PM »
Yes remember the mountain lonnie and the spring water you could drink that was cold and refreshing and didnít cost anything unlike the multitude of bottled stuff on offer now. Picking and eating blackberries from the hedgerows and catching sticklebacks in a jar or frog spawn and watching the tadpoles grow in a tin bath. Going camping in Colin Glen with a haversack filled with a tin of beans and a door step sandwhich. Thinking that you were roughing it but actually could walk home in an hour or two. Simple pleasures that cost almost nothing. 

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #92 on: March 28, 2019, 09:16:18 PM »
The absence of adult supervision and intervention of any kind in our expeditions and meanderings made them all the more enjoyable   Some time in the early,1950s my friend and classmate  asked if  would accompany her to the launderette . This was something new and my Mother had no,objection so,off we went There were seven or eight,people in this friends family and,she had to collect all the dirty washing from around the,house  She lived just off Albert St and between us we carried the bundle,to the bus stop  The,Bendix Laundrette was in Agnes St on the Shankill Rd  No one,on the bus blinked an eye as two children manoeuvred a bolster case of laundry aboard  A happy hour,of watching our washing and other people's sloshing around and then putting the wet clothes in the,spinner  The bolster case was loaded up again and The clean and heavier laundry transported back on the bus I enjoyed it so,much  I pestered my Mother, for another trip with our own washing

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #93 on: March 30, 2019, 10:13:39 PM »
Talking of launderettes reminds me of the old mangle we used to have that was handy to get your fingers trapped in. You just stuck your hand in and turned the handle and watched as your fingers were squished in the rollers. As mentioned we didn't have the luxury of our own washing machine for many years but I do remember one that seemed to operate in the back yard.  And talking of the back yard oh the joy of the outside toilet that required a candle to light the way on dark nights. I wonder what 21st century kids would make of the po or hooja as a neighbour used to call it kept under the bed for emergency use. And you cant fail to mention the old tin bath kept in the back yard  and brought out on Saturday night. My wife tells me that her granny had numerous grand children and that they all got a face and hand wash before school as they stood in line including any unfortunate neighbours children who happened to be in the kitchen at the time.  A cats or was it a cows lick being the order of the day

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #94 on: March 31, 2019, 07:30:12 PM »
A warm sunny day and happy barefoot children busy treading in a large tub   No not Italy or grapes but the backyard in wee Mc Donnell St and the tin bath normally reserved for the family ablutions contained warm soapy water and blankets This was the only,chance to get them washed and dried as most other laundry was done in the  "jawbox " in the scullery Mothers spent many hours scrubbing with a washboard and Sunlight soap or Rinso and Oxyodol   No disposable nappies  these had to be boiled in a bucket on the stove  Some times a man would arrive on Saturday and hire out washing machines for a few hours  costing about half a crown or two shillings and sixpence   These were single tub with a wringer and required some manual labour but better than standing at the sink Often think of those days when  simply switching on automatic washing machine   or seeing supermarket trolleys loaded with throwaway nappies  I suppose like many other things good handwashing is a lost art   

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #95 on: April 04, 2019, 08:51:06 PM »
Spent a pleasant morning cleaning the old Singer sewing machine that my wife's late father had built for her i.e. putting a an electric motor on it. Only to see a similar unelectrfied item (as an antique) in a shop window display in town. Dont' know if I can get it working again as it in a pretty poor state but will continue to try. Talking of Rinso reminded me of products that are still available today almost in original state like oxo cubes  which was an ingredient in dad's stew and still used in mine.  Also remember Camp coffee and glad to see that the label has been changed to show the old Indian servant now enjoying his coffee along side the raj officer instead of serving it. And what about wrights coal tar sop (still remember the distinctive smell). And cant forget jacob's club orange biscuits which a younger sister insisted on having for breakfast instead of a good old Belfast bap.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #96 on: April 05, 2019, 10:48:21 PM »
I can remember an Ad  for O X O  on our,old black and white T V  In it, Katie a young wife who wore pretty aprons cooked tasty meals for Phillip her husband when he came home,from "The Office " all enhanced by the little cube   OXO is a vital ingredient of  Belfast Stew  a very popular dish in our house  and usually,accompanied by another old favourite  H P sauce  Bisto,has been around a long,time  also Ovaltine,   and cocoa   Well known brands of confectionery and chocolate are still around but  I have heard mainly older people say they are not as nice  Still tastes change over time and none of my grandchildren would be likely,to squabble over the cauliflower in a jar of pickles Some things like Rinso  , Oxyodol   Colleen soap   and  The lovely inexpensive,perfumes,of,the,1940s,and 50s are long gone However I don't,think anyone,would,miss,the horrible castor,oil and senna,pod tea   dosed out whether they,were needed,or not, 

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #97 on: April 05, 2019, 10:54:54 PM »
P.S. Good luck,with,the Singer apart from the ELECTRICS over the years the feeders and spring for tension wear out But old or modern all basically the same,and can be repaired

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #98 on: April 21, 2019, 09:24:45 AM »
 Many chocolate eggs will be consumed today mainly by children who believe the celebrations began with The Easter Bunny  . In 1940s Mc Donnell St our EASTER treats were hens eggs boiled and put in the tea pot to make the shells turn a chocolate colour and also a strange confection called candied peel . When rationing ended we progressed to a small Cadburys egg costing one shilling and sixpence bought at Mickey Brady's shop in Leeson St    My grandchildren received their Easter eggs last night  from aunts uncle's (and granny ) and my house resembled Willy Wonkas   However there was one young fella in the street all the kids envied as he got lovely fancy chocolate Easter eggs __No names but he lived in 145  Happy Easter All