Author Topic: remembering wee mcdonnell street  (Read 6807 times)

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #45 on: February 22, 2019, 08:32:22 PM »
Yes have similar memories about confirmation. And remember the confraternity and Faith of our Fathers sung resoundingly.  Never was one for the Legion of Mary though.  Always remember a neighbour Jeannie Hanna saying that on a bus organised pilgramage there was about 20 decades of the rosary instead of a few beers and sandwiches that was expected. Ah well the road to Hell and Dundalk was always paved with good intentions.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #46 on: February 22, 2019, 09:36:09 PM »
Just an update on the subject of Confirmation Today it is very much a family event   Lots of style to be seen  Church ceremony lasts just over an hour Photographs , and even,one with,the Bishop  Nice hotel or restaurant for dinner or a party at home,The,newly confirmed is quite a bit richer by now and most will acquire that "phone " they want soon after and most do make a donation to charity  Very few now "Take the Pledge " and may only attend church on special occasions,  a lot of things,have changed since 1950

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #47 on: February 24, 2019, 11:34:41 AM »
Yep, and first communion was a bit like that tv show "say yes to the dress" at times. Boys had little suits with some flamboyant gestures in terms of bow ties or overall colour.  And yes sad to say the focus for the recipient was usually how much money had been achieved rather than the spiritual aspect but sure that's kids for you. Remember our St Josephs class being marched en masse to St Peters for some pre first confession or communion event singing a variation of a song from an old movie that went something like *Only 500 metres more to go - Only 500 metres more to go - Only 500 metres fore we end up in Saint Peters etc. Would'nt have got on choir of the year though.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #48 on: February 24, 2019, 10:45:19 PM »
My big day was June 9th 1949  It was only four years since the war ended and things were on a much more modest scale I wore a dress made by my Mother and accessories purchased from Sloans Drapery shop Mc Donnell St The gifts of money received were also modest compared to those given now    and between, clothing catering etc is quite costly Still it is,a big,occasion in a child's life and I have experienced more than a few   innocence is still there and a lovely day for family young,and old

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #49 on: February 24, 2019, 10:51:04 PM »
P.S. I certainly spent some,of my finances on a visit to the Arcadian "picture house " but that's another story 

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #50 on: February 25, 2019, 04:06:16 PM »
The Ark, the Clonard, the Diamond.the Broadway  and the Colluseum with wooden bench seats. bring back memories  Remember seeing a Jeff Chandler western at the Collie Wobbles and always remember the old ladies in black shawls going in two by two (mostly} into the Ark to see The Song of Benadette with Jennifer Jones ,some even bringing rosary beads.  Don't think you would see that today anywhere.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #51 on: February 26, 2019, 04:56:53 PM »
Like a lot of children from Mc Donnell St I was a patron of the Arcadian from a very young age  We were not used to luxury and didn't mind paying fourpence to sit on wooden benches in the "pit " People of all ages in the audience Grannies , Grandads   Lots of children Women wearing shawls some of which contained infants who were too young to leave at home Two shows nightly and when the "first house " was over the street was filled with Tarzan calls  Indian war cries and Cowboys on imaginary,horses  . Little girls were exotic singers and dancers all the way home   from the "picture house " The nearest Omniplex is twenty miles away very plush lovely popcorn drinks and snacks but for the true magic,of the "silver screen  " Arcadian  V  Omniplex the  ARK  wins the Oscar, every time   At a recent Grandparents Day when asked to describe our childhood   eleven year olds  and their teacher looked at me in disbelief when I told them I went to the cinema unaccompanied by an adult,at eight years old

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #52 on: February 26, 2019, 09:33:31 PM »
I remember getting in to see horror films with no difficulty as a child.  Probably psychologically scarred by by seeing too many vampires zombies and werewolves but it was fun. And of course you had the plusher down town cinema options like the Ritz (with organist) the Odeon or the Regent.  And as a day out there was always the zoo and funfair at Easter.  And for a special treat there was always the beach at Greencastle on a number 7 bus where I was led to believe there was a sewage outlet.  No sign of a blue flag there in those days.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #53 on: February 27, 2019, 10:11:50 PM »
My Godmother lived next door and she would sometimes bring me to the cinema usually The Broadway or The Regent , Horror films were her favourites There was never a suggestion that these films were unsuitable viewing for a child of eight or nine years  and  Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula  is a far cry from Mary Poppins    Glad to say I was not affected by exposure to scary films but another member of the family suffered quite a few nightmares after watching Boris Karloff   in The Tower Of London at the Coliseum   Those old black and white films somehow had a more menacing atmosphere,than the modern versions

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #54 on: February 28, 2019, 09:27:23 PM »
Was reminded, talking about about horror films, that a friend  and I who shall remain anonymous from Granville Street plus several other young friends went to see the Hunchback of Notre Dame in the Ark starring Anthony Quinn and once the poor old hunchback appeared he ran out of the cinema very upset. Do not think he was permanently traumatised though so it appears the Tower of London  phenomenon is not unique.


briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #55 on: February 28, 2019, 09:41:42 PM »
PS also remember an older sister scaring the daylights out of younger siblings by running a ghostly hand up and down their bedroom door after seeing a movie called something like the beast with 5 fingers.  Traumatised to this day by the sight of a glove on the floor.

Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #56 on: March 01, 2019, 09:00:43 PM »
 The Beast With five fingers , I saw that film in the Windsor 1950s  Creepy Peter Lorre was more scary than the beast . I ran from the Donegall Rd  down Roden St to the safety of wee Mc,Donnell St  convinced I was being pursed,by " The Horrible Hand " Perhaps your sister had a similar experience ? and then decided to transfer her fear to her unfortunate younger siblings, However with the passing years older and wiser I'm sure that sister is full of remorse for her actions  We all were used to spooky stories as children Ghosts Spirits and Banshees One of my earliest memories is of going with my Mother to the second house from Rooneys shop where a man had died and was laid out in an old fashioned brass bed Quite young children would also go to houses where there was a "wake " and ask to see the dead man / woman This was before the advent,of "funeral homes  To the children of the 21st century ( and their parents ) this practice would be unthinkable

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #57 on: March 02, 2019, 08:20:05 PM »
Remember there was a Mrs McKenna from Leeson Street who used to wash and prepare the recently deceased for burial before O'Kane's funeral directors would arrive with the coffin etc. There was usually a subsequent wake where much porter was consumed to ease the passage of the deceased into the after world and for all and sundry to have a good time. There was always  a great response from neighbours in terms of tea and sarnies etc. However there was an equally egalitarian response to birth as I remember being taken to see a new born in the street just after arrival. Overall a different time and a different approach to life. Was reminded recently of changes in the way that we go about our daily lives when an ex colleague (still employed) told me that it was not allowed to put your coat on the back of your chair in the work place in case someone tripped and fell over due to health and safety regulations.  Wonder what any of my grandfathers would have made of that in the Belfast of the last century. Progress of a sort I suppose.


Maymac

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #58 on: March 03, 2019, 08:59:45 PM »
My Mother was very good at sewing and a lady she knew asked her to come to a shop on the,Grosvenor Rd and she would show her a garment that needed to be altered  This was an old fashioned drapery which belonged to the lady's aunt  My Mother went there and was called in,to the room behind the shop  where she found the lady barefoot and wearing the clothing of. THE 3RD Order,of St Francis   She was a lay member of this religious order  and would  be dressed in this,when she died  She had decided the garment was a bit too short and requested my Mother to let down the hem or add a few inches to the bottom    The clothing was altered and I presume stored away untill it,was required that is unless    it had more "trying ons " in case it had shrunk  I can't imagine any one even speculating what they will be wearing on their last public appearance let,alone Having a dress rehearsal   ,,1950s another world

briggs

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Re: remembering wee mcdonnell street
« Reply #59 on: March 04, 2019, 04:21:37 PM »
Yes for some strange reason I seem to recall a plethora of St Francis like deceased in those days.  So the third order dress code was obviously popular with or without alteration.  My mother was very talented in terms of sewing and making.  But to my chagrin I remember a pair of short trousers made on the old singer trestle machine that for some strange reason (possibly availability of material) had flower patterned lining. Visible if one sat on a kerb as one did in those days.  Caused great merriment to my friends.  Probably a versatchi touch in terms of today's haute couture.  Mum obviously ahead of her time as a  fashionista. The clatter of the old singer was the music of of my childhood as it seemed to earn a few shillings for work done for neighbours and friends.  There's a swing programme on tv at the minute where the group are asked to complete sewing challenges in a specified time.  Bet there are quite a few old Belfast girls who could give them a run for their money.