Author Topic: Short Strand. East Belfast  (Read 236171 times)

Mary K. Rossi

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1110 on: December 30, 2013, 02:17:48 PM »
Here is a street directory from 1943.  It includes all the homes in the Short Strand and the names and occupations of the people who lived there. 
 
http://www.lennonwylie.co.uk/scomplete1910.htm

zazooooo

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1111 on: January 01, 2014, 10:37:20 PM »

dopeydavy

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1112 on: January 03, 2014, 04:43:04 AM »
many thanks for the post,took me back a bit, ;)

jonjoe

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1113 on: January 03, 2014, 07:23:17 PM »
mary k: i found that directory really interesting a lot of my family are not living at the addresses i knew them to be.

jonjoe

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1114 on: January 17, 2014, 07:40:06 PM »
webby: just noticed your comment i went to school with frankie webb.

Mary K. Rossi

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Re: Nobel's Field
« Reply #1115 on: January 23, 2014, 04:13:47 PM »
 Nobel’s field backed up to our house at 59 Seaforde St. It was the playground for the neighborhood kids who lived in the district known as the Short Strand. The neighborhood was a ghetto, we had no playgrounds, so Nobel’s field was ours. The only thing we had plenty of was imagination.
In the “field” we could become anything we wanted. We could dig trenches and pretend we were soldiers in the war. We could build sheds, play cowboys and Indians. Pretend we were in a show or reenact the picture we just saw at the Pop or the Drome. We would sing at the top of lungs, the songs we learned from one another.
Kids would play marlies, and on Sunday after mass the men would congregate in the field and gamble. Tossing coins in the air and calling “heads or tails” Sunday always brought the sound of bagpipes from St. Matthews club. The old hut was falling down, but the boys still went there to practice.
On the rare occasion it snowed, we would ride down the little hill on the bin lids and scream with joy. Often, in cold weather we would throw a bucket of water on the ground so that it would freeze and we would make it a slide.
The girls would use a brush to create the walls of pretend houses in the dirt by packing the dirt and making it into mounds. Glass was collected in all colors and put into jam jars to pretend it was sweets in our wee shop. Pieces of aluminum from cigarettes packages wrapped around stones was used as chocolate bars. We would play fish and chip shop and cut up potatoes and put them in a pot of salty water and eat them raw. The boys would play cricket with old socks rolled up for a ball. If anyone had a football it was treasured and guarded.
We dug holes in the walls and climbed into the property behind the field and were often chased away and threatened by the police to keep out. We would scale the walls, at least 15 feet high, using missing brick holes and juts in the bricks as grips. The broken glass embedded in the cement on top of the wall did not deter us. It was our Mount Everest. We were mountain climbers.
In the summer we collected old wooden crates, planks and old tires or anything that would burn and store it in the Field until August 15 and on that night in the street in front of May Young’s, screams of delight. It was the best event of the year. If we were lucky we might get kissed by a boy. We would go home smelling of smoke with our eyes black from the soot.
When they finally walled in the field, we were outraged. How could they do that? We still tried to climb the walls, but it was not the same. The old bricks had grips, the new one did not, so it made it more difficult to get up the wall. The end of an era had come. Our Nobel’s field was gone.
 
 
 
 
 

Jim B

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1116 on: January 24, 2014, 12:03:21 AM »
Hi Mary I just read one of your earlier post regarding old school friends. Madeline Lundy from Lowry street is my first cousin. She is doing well and lives in Glengormley. Her mother ( My Aunt) just passed away Aug 2013 at the grand old age of 97.
My battery was dead...

Mary K. Rossi

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1117 on: January 24, 2014, 01:41:24 PM »
Please give Madeline my regards when you see her.  I think often of the Lowry St. girls and all the fun we had together.  I'd like to hear from more of them.  I'm sorry to hear about her mother. 

Mary K. Rossi

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1118 on: January 24, 2014, 02:36:13 PM »
I forgot to mention that my maiden name was Kinsella and my aunts, Jinnie and Mary, lived across from the Lundys on Lowry St.

jonjoe

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1119 on: January 31, 2014, 07:49:59 PM »
mary kinsella: i really enjoyed reading your memories of "the field" i remember everything being just as you describe.you may find this interesting,on a short visit to the district a few weeks ago i was walking around trying to imagine where everything used to be when i realised what was different although the place is full of lovely houses now there are no "corners"now. when we were younger the place had "corners" everywhere here you went to meet up with your mates, there was may youngs shop(to close to our house for me) the shop across from the shack on beechfield st. both corners of beechfield st./mountpotting rd. kevin currans shop altcar st. my favourite was "scoop mc guinnesses" shop corner of thompson st,/miora st. there were loads of corners all over the place hughes shop corner of  vulcan st./saul st. cullens shop seaforde st.converys shop at the school to name but a few. when i ask my nephews did they still meet their mates at "corners" they laughed fit to burst. "unc" they said we all have mobile phones now we dont need corners! me i think it,s sad they dont know what their missing.

Mary K. Rossi

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1120 on: February 01, 2014, 04:42:57 PM »
I remember all those corners well and very fondly.  Those were the best of times.  We just didn't know it.  I left Seaforde St. when I was 14 and all I had to take with me was the memories of the people and places I'd left behind.  Those memories kept me going when times got tough.  The sights and sound of the district are etched in my mind forever.  I'll never forget the good people and their kindness.  I'll never forget my chums and the great fun we had together.

opsey

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1121 on: February 17, 2014, 07:09:23 PM »
My mum grew up in sheriff street,Christina Walsh.....anyone remember her? She lived in no.49

sydenhambetty

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1122 on: February 17, 2014, 07:46:52 PM »
I remember all those corners well and very fondly.  Those were the best of times.  We just didn't know it.  I left Seaforde St. when I was 14 and all I had to take with me was the memories of the people and places I'd left behind.  Those memories kept me going when times got tough.  The sights and sound of the district are etched in my mind forever.  I'll never forget the good people and their kindness.  I'll never forget my chums and the great fun we had together.
.    Mary even though I grew up in Sydenham like you I will always the good times and friends I had around your neighbourhood. My family all lived in altar street but had many friends at your end. The best of people. :-*
Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination.  Oscar Wilde

BellaBella

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1123 on: February 23, 2014, 10:05:31 AM »
Mary and Jinny Kinsella, lived opposite Martha and Bella Bradley, remember they use to sell chocolates for charity, I am Bella Bradleys granddaughter Isobel  Ria Lundy  and Susan Lundy lived a few doors from us.  Maura Stratton is my cousin. 

jackiehillis

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Re: Short Strand. East Belfast
« Reply #1124 on: February 23, 2014, 05:37:38 PM »
Mary and Jinny Kinsella, lived opposite Martha and Bella Bradley, remember they use to sell chocolates for charity, I am Bella Bradleys granddaughter Isobel  Ria Lundy  and Susan Lundy lived a few doors from us.  Maura Stratton is my cousin.
   BellaBella. My sister is married to a John Stratton from Severn Street. Her name is Marie ( Hillis ) Stratton.
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