Author Topic: Northern Ireland's future at risk without post-Brexit customs deal, says Hain  (Read 28130 times)


James James

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"January 22 2019"
https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/brexit/nodeal-brexit-could-cost-northern-ireland-5bn-a-year-says-cbi-37735288.html

"No-deal Brexit could cost Northern Ireland £5bn a year, says CBI"

"A no-deal Brexit could leave Northern Ireland's economy almost £5bn less productive by 2034, according to a CBI study published today."

"The business group warned that the region would be among the parts of the UK most exposed to the fallout."

"The predicted drop in output represents more than annual public spending on hospitals, GP surgeries and other health services here."

jjmack

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Wear your RED POPPY with PRIDE.  Lest we forget. BUY BRITISH.  Support the forces of LAW and ORDER, PAST and PRESENT. Justice for the BRITISH ARMY.

jjmack

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Wear your RED POPPY with PRIDE.  Lest we forget. BUY BRITISH.  Support the forces of LAW and ORDER, PAST and PRESENT. Justice for the BRITISH ARMY.

IrishDigger

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-46998533

 :o

You have actually posted two links in two different posts on the same topic, one without comment and one showing a gif of you rolling in laughter and so I won't take that one too seriously, notwithstanding that you mocked the speaker's accent. (I wonder how your own accent sounds? ;) )

However, the BBC link appears to less bias than the Belfast Telegraph and shows that the Irish Prime Minister on the World Economic Forum was simply asked for his opinion on what a 'Hard Border' would look like and he gave it.

Asked to describe what a hard border would look like if the outcome of Brexit was a worst-case scenario, Mr Varadkar said: “It would involve customs posts, it would involve people in uniform and it may involve the need, for example, for cameras, physical infrastructure, possibly a police presence or army presence to back it up.”

Remember, he was asked for a 'worst-case scenario'.

He further stated that such a border, given the history of Irish politics would become a target.

Bearing in mind that no one really knows the outcome of Brexit, I took his comments to be nothing more than speculation with possibilities.


James James

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ANOTHER,... IRISH BORDER REALITY CHECK.



In February 2018 the Chief Constable of Northern Ireland said this,...

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/feb/07/n-ireland-police-chief-says-hard-brexit-border-posts-would-be-paramilitary-target

"Police chief says 'hard Brexit' Irish border would be paramilitary target"

"Fortified frontier would put officers’ lives at risk, says George Hamilton"

"Northern Ireland’s top police officer has warned that border posts and security installations created as a result of a “hard Brexit” would be seen as “fair game” for attack by violent dissident republicans."

"The Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland said he feared that a fortified frontier that would have to be policed around the clock would put his officers’ lives in greater danger from anti-peace process paramilitaries."

"George Hamilton also expressed concern that the British government and the EU had not yet come up with a post-Brexit alternative to the European arrest warrant (EAW), which he said was a vital tool in the fight against terrorism and crime on the island of Ireland."

"He described as “severe” the violent threat from the  New IRA and other terrorist groups opposed to the peace settlement in Northern Ireland."

"In an interview with the Guardian, the officer , who has one of the most challenging policing jobs in Europe, said security policy in Ireland needed “something cleverer than a hard border”."

"On the possibility of Brexit leading to a hardened Irish border with customs posts or fixed security installations, Hamilton said: “The last thing we would want is any infrastructure around the border because there is something symbolic about it and it becomes a target for violent dissident republicans."

Our assessment is that they would be a target because it would be representative of the state and in their minds fair game for attack. I would assume that that assessment is shared by senior politicians and officials who are negotiating Brexit."

While I am chief constable I do not want to enter the political debate over Brexit but I still think it’s fair to comment on some of its implications and scenarios. And a hard border from a policing perspective would not be a good outcome because it would a create a focus and a target.”

"He said fixed frontier customs and security posts would expose PSNI officers to greater danger than they already face from anti-peace process republican paramilitaries."

Anything that makes the police presence predictable in places where terrorists are active of course raises the threat and increases the harm to my officers. We deal with risk every day and we are good at it but unfortunately the terrorists only have to be lucky once and get a result with catastrophic consequences. I think it would be a poor use of police resources if we are going to have to protect physical infrastructures at the border.”

"Hamilton said hard border installations could also have a negative political impact in both Northern Ireland and the Republic."

"“If you put up significant physical infrastructure at a border which is the subject of contention politically your are re-emphasising the context and the causes of the conflict. So that creates tensions and challenges and questions around people’s identity, which in some ways the Good Friday agreement helped to deal with,” he said."

“There is a small group of determined dissident republicans who would see that physical apparatus if it’s on the northern side of the border as a representation of the UK state.”

"The chief constable said he had been asking for 18 months that both the British government and the EU offer up an alternative to the European arrest warrant."

"Hamilton said he feared the PSNI may no longer be able to deploy the EAW after the UK leaves the EU. “The clock is ticking,” he said, in terms of the UK and the EU drafting legislation to replace the EAW."

"Over the last five years the PSNI said it has used the EAW to extradite 352 criminal suspects to other EU countries, including the Irish Republic, while 54 have been sent back to Northern Ireland."

“In the middle of all the higher politics about the EU exit the European arrest warrant has been overlooked. You would think at one level it is in everybody’s interest including the remaining EU countries and even the most ardent Brexiteers that we can keep each other’s countries safe, that we can exchange intelligence and that we have mechanisms to bring people to justice."

“Unlike issues like trade or immigration where different agendas are running it is hard to envisage how anyone would not be up for being able to exchange evidence and information as well as moving detained persons between jurisdictions,” he said."

"Asked if his force’s strength of 6,700 officers could properly police the 300-mile Irish border, Hamilton said that unless there were extra numbers recruited resources would have to taken away from other areas of policing."

“There would be an increased demand due to a hard border and a pull of resources towards that which means either an uplift in police funding or else we would have to have reduced levels of service in other areas.”

"He welcomed the fact that all sides in the Brexit debate in Belfast, Dublin, London and Brussels agreed that a hard border should be avoided after the UK leaves the EU."

"While welcoming a decision by one of the dissident republican groups – Óglaigh na hÉireann – to declare a ceasefire, Hamilton said the threat from hardline factions still engaged in violence, such as the New IRA, was severe. He pointed out that last year there were five serious attempts by dissident republicans to kill his officers, including a gun attack in north Belfast that left two policemen wounded."

"Hamilton said that in relation to counter-terrorist operations in 2017, the PSNI carried out 148 searches and made 37 arrests, resulting in 26 people being charged or reported to the Public Prosecution Service in Northern Ireland."

"The Chief Constable said the proportion of jailed dissident republicans compared with the overall membership of their organisations was “very high.” He said a number of “senior characters” inside the New IRA and Continuity IRA were facing prosecution in the near future."

"On Ulster loyalist paramilitaries, he said there was a clear split between those “progressive” politically minded paramilitaries who had “bought into the dream of the peace process” and those using the names of the UVF and UDA as a “protective cloak” to engage in drug dealing, loan sharking and prostitution."

"There were 10 to 12 foreign criminal gangs operating in Northern Ireland, some of them working in collusion with criminal loyalist factions, he said."

“The irony here is that there are loyalist groups working with eastern European gangsters in the drugs trade, in prostitution and extortion. Yet these same loyalist groups are the ones behind burning out and intimidating people from places like Lithuania and Romania in areas they perceive as their own,” Hamilton said."

"The chief constable also said he was worried about the rise of so-called “paedophile hunters” who are using social media to track down those they accuse of child abuse or possessing child pornography. The Public Prosecution Service in Northern Ireland is researching about 100 cases that “paedophile hunters” have reported in terms of alleged child abusers."

"He referred to a recent incident in Ballymena, County Antrim, which in his view underlined the dangers of what he called “vigilanteism”. A man was driven from his home by a group of “paedophile hunters” in the town and 24 hours later his home was set on fire."


jjmack

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You have actually posted two links in two different posts on the same topic, one without comment and one showing a gif of you rolling in laughter and so I won't take that one too seriously, notwithstanding that you mocked the speaker's accent. (I wonder how your own accent sounds? ;) )

However, the BBC link appears to less bias than the Belfast Telegraph and shows that the Irish Prime Minister on the World Economic Forum was simply asked for his opinion on what a 'Hard Border' would look like and he gave it.

Asked to describe what a hard border would look like if the outcome of Brexit was a worst-case scenario, Mr Varadkar said: “It would involve customs posts, it would involve people in uniform and it may involve the need, for example, for cameras, physical infrastructure, possibly a police presence or army presence to back it up.”

Remember, he was asked for a 'worst-case scenario'.

He further stated that such a border, given the history of Irish politics would become a target.

Bearing in mind that no one really knows the outcome of Brexit, I took his comments to be nothing more than speculation with possibilities.

More unhelpful scaremongering from the 'wee man', nothing else. How does your accent sound, by the way ?  ::)
Wear your RED POPPY with PRIDE.  Lest we forget. BUY BRITISH.  Support the forces of LAW and ORDER, PAST and PRESENT. Justice for the BRITISH ARMY.

jillyfred

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Re: Northern Ireland's future at risk without post-Brexit customs deal, says Hain
« Reply #713 on: February 03, 2019, 09:24:36 AM »

Had the E.U.been told two years ago take the U.K. deal and the money, or its no deal and no money,
we would have been saved all the `verbal tripe`we  have been inflicted with by a bunch of losers!
IMHO as per usual.

jilly :)

White dee

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Love all, trust few, everything is real but,
Not everyone is true,,
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James James

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Re: Northern Ireland's future at risk without post-Brexit customs deal, says Hain
« Reply #715 on: February 04, 2019, 04:57:00 AM »
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/nov/17/dup-northern-ireland-brexit-deal-ulster-farmers-union

"DUP and Northern Irish businesses at odds over May's Brexit deal"

"Ulster Farmers’ Union tells Arlene Foster no-deal Brexit would be disastrous for region"

"A row has erupted between the Democratic Unionist party and Northern Ireland business and farming interests after the Ulster Farmers’ Union gave its backing to Theresa May’s Brexit deal, in the first sign of cracks in support for the unionist party’s policy at home."

"The union, which represents more than 11,000 farmers, many of whom traditionally vote for the DUP, has called on Arlene Foster to vote for the Brexit deal, telling her a no-deal Brexit would be absolutely disastrous for the region."

James James

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Re: Northern Ireland's future at risk without post-Brexit customs deal, says Hain
« Reply #716 on: February 04, 2019, 05:08:51 AM »
https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2019/jan/03/police-reinforcements-for-northern-ireland-in-case-of-no-deal-brexit-1000-officers-training-trouble-hard-border
"Fri 4 Jan 2019"

"Police reinforcements for Northern Ireland in case of no-deal Brexit"

"Almost 1,000 officers from rest of UK to start training to deal with trouble arising from hard border"

"Plans for a national mobilisation of police, which were devised in the wake of the 2011 riots across England, are being revised and adapted for the tensions thrown up by a no-deal Brexit"


"Almost 1,000 police officers from England and Scotland are to begin training for deployment in Northern Ireland in case of disorder from a no-deal Brexit, the Guardian has learned."

"The plans were put in place after Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) chiefs asked for reinforcements to deal with any trouble that arises from a hard border. The training for officers from English forces and Police Scotland is expected to begin this month."

"The news came on a day of growing concern that a no-deal Brexit is becoming a distinct possibility, on which:" etcetera,...

My note,... well it might be interesting to see how residents in nationalist areas in Belfast might regard and react to being policed by British mainland police officers. !

JackM

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Re: Northern Ireland's future at risk without post-Brexit customs deal, says Hain
« Reply #717 on: February 04, 2019, 07:08:58 PM »
Had the E.U.been told two years ago take the U.K. deal and the money, or its no deal and no money,
we would have been saved all the `verbal tripe`we  have been inflicted with by a bunch of losers!
IMHO as per usual.

jilly :)

Hear Hear, the words of wisdom as usual.   O0 O0
Justice for the Massacred of La Mon and other atrocities.  The TRUTH will set them FREE.
Justice for the RUC and British Army.

James James

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Re: Northern Ireland's future at risk without post-Brexit customs deal, says Hain
« Reply #718 on: February 05, 2019, 07:25:25 AM »
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/brexit/borderlands/keeping-peace

"Keeping the Peace"

"An old conflict and a new Border: How Britain's exit from the European Union could threaten 20 years of peace in Northern Ireland."

"There will be twice as many land Border crossings in Ireland as there are in the entirety of Europe."


James James

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Re: Northern Ireland's future at risk without post-Brexit customs deal, says Hain
« Reply #719 on: February 08, 2019, 05:03:02 AM »
"February 7 2019"
https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/uk/dup-meeting-on-partys-brexit-stance-did-not-discuss-impact-on-northern-ireland-says-jim-wells-37791988.html

"DUP meeting on party's Brexit stance did not discuss impact on Northern Ireland, says Jim Wells"

"We were always anti-EU and debates had been held for decades, says party outsider"

"Jim Wells has lifted the lid on the crunch DUP meeting which decided which side the party would back in the EU referendum campaign which subsequently saw it catapulted into the centre of UK and EU politics."

"He revealed there was no impact assessment presented on how a leave win would affect Northern Ireland and that there was no voices raised in support of remaining with the matter decided on within minutes although the meeting lasted "several hours".

"He said given the party's opposition to the EU for over four decades - and the experience gathered over that time - it was an easy decision to make. He said the mechanics of how the UK departed - including for a solution to the Irish border - were not discussed."

"Nor was a presentation on the strengths or weaknesses of leaving or remaining done."