Author Topic: TELEGRAM BOYS  (Read 13180 times)

bikerjoe

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #60 on: October 15, 2012, 10:23:18 PM »
pennywhistle do you remember sean cullen, foxy,jacko, victor,joe?

dendar

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #61 on: October 15, 2012, 10:47:57 PM »
hi Another name i remember was r.j. hintz ( beansy )
love to hear about those guys fron my day 1962 -63
cheers
dendar

Pennywhistle

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #62 on: October 19, 2012, 01:21:14 AM »
pennywhistle do you remember sean cullen, foxy,jacko, victor,joe?

Hi "bikerjoe",sorry for the late reply;still on Cyprus time and trying to get a wee bit of heat into the oul body after thon furnace! "bikerjoe"? You wouldn't happen to be big Joe Kirby,by any chance?
I certainly remember a "Foxy",glasses and a ginger napper and Sean Cullen hailed from up "The Falls".The best I remember was he might have came from about Beechmount and his catchphrase was "we play tig with hatchetts"! It is incredible what sticks in a body's mind!
 
I am sure I could rhyme off about 60 plus "Telegram Boys" names from my time.Sadly,the "nippers",that is the wee bucks that came on board when I was a "battle hardened vet" simply escape me.Perhaps I simply didn't take the time.My loss.
 
The "Big Lad's",that is those about to move on,were (to a wee virgin soldier's mind) like WW2 ace's who had an aura about them,ragged,deliberately,I think,decrepited and all with a style of their own.By the time I hit their status,I was like "Compo" out of "The Last of the  Summer Wine",with a four poun' pair of black "Wellie's",with the cuffs turned down.
 
Apart from my time forced into "Queen's House",|It was an absolute pleasure to go to work in the "G.P.O.
 
If this wee thread has the legs,I will rhyme off the names of all thse I can recall.
" Kitchen house reared and still,rough as Purdy Oaten ".

suitcaseau

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #63 on: April 07, 2013, 02:10:43 PM »
I was a counter clerk in the early seventies and worked under Paddy Forrester in Donegall Square post office. A very nice man.  Also remember Barney Boyle who was reputed to have the first quid he ever earned.  Also worked with Nipper Nesbitt when he was a counter clerk at Donegall Square.  He left the post office and worked for prudential insurance for a while.  I recall Martin Weir was the inspector of messengers back then.   

The Lounge Lizard

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #64 on: April 07, 2013, 03:49:57 PM »
I was a counter clerk in the early seventies and worked under Paddy Forrester in Donegall Square post office. A very nice man.  Also remember Barney Boyle who was reputed to have the first quid he ever earned.  Also worked with Nipper Nesbitt when he was a counter clerk at Donegall Square.  He left the post office and worked for prudential insurance for a while.  I recall Martin Weir was the inspector of messengers back then.
I was on the counter in Donegall Square BO in the early 80's. Jack Kyle was in charge. If you were there in the 70's you'd have been well up the seniority list by the time I got in!!!..good office to work in ....world of a difference between it and Royal Ave.
Memories they can't be bought,they cant be won at carnivals for free,it took me years to get those souvenirs and I don't know how they slipped away fr

suitcaseau

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #65 on: April 08, 2013, 10:00:11 AM »
Hi. I had left the post office by the eighties. But I remember Jack Kyle who was a counter clerk with me at Donegal sq.  Nice bloke.  I imagine he would have been a good boss. He was a very good snooker player.  Would be a great age now if alive. In those days we were called postal and telegraph officers.  That changed to Postal officers.  Joe MAGILL is my name;  if you see jack give him my regards. Another mate of mine from those days was paddy McMahon. Now living in Australia

stranmillis v

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #66 on: January 28, 2015, 12:30:26 PM »
I was a telegram boy,you did 1 year on a push bike before you went on the motorbikes.badge number was 1033.meet some of the boys some months back.I drove the bikes in the 1960's.

BIKERJOE THAT WAS MY NUMBER JUNE 72 -FEB 75
"This society believed it was looking towards a new future, yet we consistently find ourselves being dragged backwards."

Bigot's are ignored by me.

JohnKelly

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Re: TELEGRAM BOYS
« Reply #67 on: May 18, 2020, 11:43:25 AM »
It's been quite a few years since I last saw a Telegram Boy around Belfast.
I can still remember them driving around on their lightweight motorcycles - very tidy uniforms complete with pillowbox hat. Think the uniforms were a dark blue with a little red trim on them.
They would carry small pouches in which they kept the Telegrams they were delivering.
When you saw them drive up to someones door, you could be sure that it was VERY IMPORTANT news being delivered and the quickest way for that delivery was by sending a Telegram. All the boys were mostly fresh out of school and had to go thru a test before being employed as a T.Boy. It must have been an exciting job for the young men, and it made them feel important too when they motorcycled  around the town wearing their uniforms.
But unfortunately like many other ways of life, the Telegram Boy has been replaced by Technology - emails etc.

I was listening to mid-day radio the other day, what they call a talk-back-show, in this particular segment the announcer started a topic on what was your first job and are you still doing it.

A listener phoned in and said he was a teacher but his first job was as a Telegram Boy, there was a slight pause and the announcer asked if that was a person who delivered newspapers, the caller had to explain what a Telegram Boy was but even at I don't think the announcer really got it.

Interesting to read your stories.