Author Topic: 50s childhood  (Read 2244 times)

Eddie Sterling

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50s childhood
« on: May 19, 2018, 12:45:24 AM »


Ye know, folk memory is a strange thing. When I was growing up in the 50s a pal and I would play among the dams of a derelict linen bleaching factory near Whiteabbey (no cotton wool kids then!)
We would catch ‘spricks’ in our nets - sticklebacks and redbreasters - and put them into jamjars to die a lingering death back home.
Sometimes a redbreaster would have a little white growth on its head … to us that meant the tiddler was infected with polio (the disease was conquered in 1953). 
I once sliced my knee to the bone on a shard of glass climbing through a window of the factory. I can still see the surprisingly brilliant whiteness of the kneecap.
We packed the small wound with sphagnum moss, and just carried on. It healed and required no stitches. I have the scar to this day.
My friend remembered being told that is what they did in the First World War. Roy went on to become a doctor.
My grandfather, from Dhu Varren Crescent, Belfast, used to love that wee story. He had been a stretcher bearer with the 36th Ulster Division on the Somme (he was awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre for rescuing soldiers under fire).

derdrei

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2018, 12:28:25 AM »

Ye know, folk memory is a strange thing. When I was growing up in the 50s a pal and I would play among the dams of a derelict linen bleaching factory near Whiteabbey (no cotton wool kids then!)
We would catch ‘spricks’ in our nets - sticklebacks and redbreasters - and put them into jamjars to die a lingering death back home.
Sometimes a redbreaster would have a little white growth on its head … to us that meant the tiddler was infected with polio (the disease was conquered in 1953). 
I once sliced my knee to the bone on a shard of glass climbing through a window of the factory. I can still see the surprisingly brilliant whiteness of the kneecap.
We packed the small wound with sphagnum moss, and just carried on. It healed and required no stitches. I have the scar to this day.
My friend remembered being told that is what they did in the First World War. Roy went on to become a doctor.
My grandfather, from Dhu Varren Crescent, Belfast, used to love that wee story. He had been a stretcher bearer with the 36th Ulster Division on the Somme (he was awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre for rescuing soldiers under fire).
great memories you have there .

jillyfred

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2018, 07:36:57 AM »


Ye know, folk memory is a strange thing. When I was growing up in the 50s a pal and I would play among the dams of a derelict linen bleaching factory near Whiteabbey (no cotton wool kids then!)
We would catch ‘spricks’ in our nets - sticklebacks and redbreasters - and put them into jamjars to die a lingering death back home.
Sometimes a redbreaster would have a little white growth on its head … to us that meant the tiddler was infected with polio (the disease was conquered in 1953). 
I once sliced my knee to the bone on a shard of glass climbing through a window of the factory. I can still see the surprisingly brilliant whiteness of the kneecap.
We packed the small wound with sphagnum moss, and just carried on. It healed and required no stitches. I have the scar to this day.
My friend remembered being told that is what they did in the First World War. Roy went on to become a doctor.
My grandfather, from Dhu Varren Crescent, Belfast, used to love that wee story. He had been a stretcher bearer with the 36th Ulster Division on the Somme (he was awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre for rescuing soldiers under fire).
=====
Interesting post Eddie,thank you for sharing and Welcome to the Forum.
Jilly

derdrei

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2018, 10:11:41 AM »
my friend and me use to climb over back yard walls just for fun. go on are roller skates all round the place. play skipping games also go  on the billy cart not forgetting my best  game of marlies.

sj

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2018, 03:56:15 AM »
My biggest adventure was a day at the Waterworks when you had to have a key to get in to the ponds.  I was amazed to see men racing full scale models of sailing yachts.  It was all very genteel. ;)
I'm patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it ...

Dot/dash

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2018, 05:08:58 PM »
My biggest adventure was a day at the Waterworks when you had to have a key to get in to the ponds.  I was amazed to see men racing full scale models of sailing yachts.  It was all very genteel. ;)

hello Sam          it's  soooooo  good to see you posting           I you are keeping well           :)

love me       love my gelding    

sj

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2018, 05:25:31 AM »
hello Sam          it's  soooooo  good to see you posting           I you are keeping well           :)

Hello Dot,dash,dot dot dash.  Good to see you are still with us.  I have been missing and not posting much.  Just back from Vietnam & Cambodia.  How about you/?  Do you still live in England or are you preparing for Brexit. :D
Childhood in Belfast for me was not bad as we lived in the North of the city and had lots of park space and the Bellevue estate was a magical bus ride away. :)
I'm patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it ...

jjmack

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2018, 05:49:19 AM »
Ah, yes the 1950's, the good old days.  O0
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misssmyth1

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2018, 05:18:01 PM »
we were out all day playing and having fun came home when starving and usually filthy but happy. healthy lives. except maybe.... when swinging  across a river on a rope or climbing trees or turning off the electric fence to play in the Farmers fields when I used to visit my cousin picking blackberries and fishing for spricks jumping in the haystacks and pinching apples .. LOL   .. maybe not politically correct but we were just  kids having adventures .. I was a tomboy  & could do anything the boys could do and had many male friends as well as lots of female friends  skipping ,swinging aroundt he lamp posts, roller skating ,cycling etc;  going to the parks ,good memories

Bigali

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #9 on: June 09, 2018, 05:41:45 PM »
I wasn't even a dirty thought in my Da's heid in the 50s  :o
Tout Prest

Eddie Sterling

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2018, 03:31:54 AM »

During the long, long summer holidays we were out all day after breakfast, and then back for our tea (sometimes just banana sandwiches and a mug of sweet tea) covered in muck and scratches. We were built like whippets. My mates and I would play commandos and cowboys and Indians. One time we played Robin Hood, and that landed me in trouble. I had found my grandfather's First World War bayonet (given to my dad), and made matchsticks out of my friends' wooden 'swords'. My mother wasn't pleased when she found out. I got a whack!


sj

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2018, 06:50:01 AM »
 The fifties were much better times , or so we thought, than the forties and thirties.  The thirties had the great depression and a World War 2 .  The forties had 5 years of war, food rationing and many deaths so after the war seemed to be a good time but I can remember food rationing , housing shortage and petrol rationing ( due to the Suez crisis ) but then these were adult concerns  but not great times. The cinemas had some great films and the North of Ireland started to build new schools. ;)
I'm patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it ...

derdrei

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #12 on: June 15, 2018, 12:15:42 AM »
when I think back it was one of the most happy times .all was well in the world if your palls were out playing to.

misssmyth1

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #13 on: June 23, 2018, 08:53:56 PM »
i think all of that fresh air and being very active stood us all in good stead and lots of pals to play with no one was lonely or molly coddled  I was always falling off something ,, bike ,a wall etc but got up and got on with it .   lots of kids all doing the same things laughing a lot too .Did anyone have a GUIDER ?   my dad helped me build one two big wheels at the front and two ball bearings at the back and  the string to 'guide it'  a big wooden box was the 'carriage'   I loved mine . my mother said she used to despair thinking id never be a girlie girl but I became that a bit later when I started secondary school ...we all had fun and it was usually harmless in most cases .playing marbles and skipping  and taking a neighbours dog to Barnets Park for the day .

Falls

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Re: 50s childhood
« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2018, 10:44:19 PM »
Anyone remember calf milk.