Author Topic: Ulster Protestant Association UPA  (Read 1571 times)

brendain122

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2018, 11:10:34 PM »
It's not an alleged organization. It existed and had a branch in the shipyard among other places. Go the sources in Wikipedia supplied by a respondent here or just type in the search in Wikipedia yourself. Here it is:
Ulster Protestant Action (UPA) was an Ulster loyalist and Protestant fundamentalist vigilantegroup in Northern Ireland that was founded in 1956 and reformed as the Protestant Unionist Partyin 1966.[/font][/size]
The group was founded at a special meeting at the Ulster Unionist Party's (UUP) offices in Glengall Street, Belfast, in 1956. Among the attendees were many loyalists who were to become major figures in the 1960s and 1970, such as Ian Paisley and Desmond Boal. The independent unionistMP Norman Porter also attended, but took no further part in the group.[1] The meeting's declared purpose was to organise the defence of Ulster Protestant areas against anticipated Irish Republican Army (IRA) activity, based on the old Ulster Protestant Association immediately after the partition of Ireland in 1920, who organised assassination missions into Catholic areas of Belfast.[2] The new body decided to call itself "Ulster Protestant Action", and the first year of its existence was taken up with the discussion of vigilante patrols, street barricades, and drawing up lists of IRA suspects in Belfast and rural areas.[3][/font][/size]
The initial executive of the UPA consisted of John McQuade, Billy Spence, Charles McCullough, Richard Fenton, Frank Millar, Sammy Verner, Herbert Ditty, Bob Newman and Noel Doherty, with Paisley as an ex officio member.[4][/font][/size]
Even though no IRA threat materialised in Belfast, and despite it becoming clear that the IRA's activities during the Border Campaign were to be limited to the border areas, Ulster Protestant Action remained in being. Factory and workplace branches were formed under the UPA, including one by Paisley in Belfast's Ravenhill area under his direct control. The concern of the UPA increasingly came to focus on the defence of "Bible Protestantism" and Protestant interests where jobs and housing were concerned.[5][/font][/size]
Although initially opposed to professional politicians, specifically banning them from membership of the group, the UPA stood the former Belfast City Councillor and superintendent of an independent gospel mission, Albert Duff, against Brian Maginess in Iveagh at the Northern Ireland general election, 1958.[6] Maginess was perceived as being sympathetic to Catholics, having banned an Orange Order parade in 1952,[7] and Duff was able to take 41.5% of the vote, although he failed to win the seat. Duff was more successful in May 1958, when he regained a seat on Belfast City Council, with Charles McCullough also taking a seat for the UPA, while, in 1960, Boal won the Belfast Shankill constituency at Stormont as an official UUP candidate.[6][/font][/size]
As Paisley came to dominate Ulster Protestant Action, he received his first convictions for public order offences. In June 1959, a major riot occurred on the Shankill Road in Belfast following a rally he had spoken at.[5] His moves to form a Protestant unionist political party caused tensions in the group, and Paisley's supporters formed their own "Premier" branch of the UPA, reinforcing their control of the group.[6][/font][/size]
In the 1960s, Paisley and the UPA campaigned against Prime Minister of Northern Ireland Terence O'Neill's rapprochement with the Republic of Ireland and his meetings with Taoiseach of the Republic, Seán Lemass, a veteran of the Easter Rising of 1916 and the anti-Treaty IRA. They opposed efforts by O'Neill to deliver civil rights to the Catholic minority in Northern Ireland, especially the proposed abolition of gerrymandering of local electoral areas for the election of urban and county councils. In 1964 his demand that the Royal Ulster Constabulary remove an Irish Tricolour from Sinn Féin's Belfast offices led to two days of rioting after this was followed through. In the aftermath of these protests, Duff and James McCarroll were elected to Belfast City Council for the UPA.[8] In 1966, the group reformed as the Protestant Unionist Party.[/font][/size]

HarryHippo

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Re: Ulster Protestant Action UPA
« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2018, 11:11:33 PM »

are you writing a book ? may i ask ?
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brendain122

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2018, 11:50:17 PM »
Hello. No not writing a book but interested in writing a play. Have you personal knowledge of the UPA?

jjmack

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2018, 05:26:36 AM »
Hello. No not writing a book but interested in writing a play. Have you personal knowledge of the UPA?

I think Sam Thompson may have beaten you to it.  ::)
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belle

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2018, 08:29:01 AM »
Perhaps it was a little like the masons...Only a few were admitted.
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brendain122

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2018, 09:11:22 AM »
There was nothing secret about the organization, indeed members were encouraged to wear openly UPA badges whilst working for example in the shipyard and other long established industries nearby. Also at rallies, 12th of July parades, demonstrations organised by UPA etc.See the detailed history I have just posted. It had thousands of members in Belfast.

Bigali

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2018, 09:36:19 AM »
There was nothing secret about the organization, indeed members were encouraged to wear openly UPA badges whilst working for example in the shipyard and other long established industries nearby. Also at rallies, 12th of July parades, demonstrations organised by UPA etc.See the detailed history I have just posted. It had thousands of members in Belfast.

I'm assuming it must have been mainly a Belfast thing even though the article mentions rural areas. I grew up in North Antrim fairly well versed in Protestant history and folklore and I'd never heard of the UPA until I saw your thread , I've asked some older relatives and friends , some of whom are members of the Loyal Orders and they have never heard of it either.
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brendain122

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2018, 10:17:37 AM »
Thank you for your feedback. It seems that it was a mainly Belfast based grouping from what information I have and your checks helps to corroborate and confirm that, so your response and inquiries are particularly helpful in this respect.  Thank you very much for your assistance.

Bigali

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2018, 10:24:56 AM »
Thank you for your feedback. It seems that it was a mainly Belfast based grouping from what information I have and your checks helps to corroborate and confirm that, so your response and inquiries are particularly helpful in this respect.  Thank you very much for your assistance.

My input was minimal to say the least but thank you .

Just a thought , perhaps the staff at Schomberg House might be able to help if the UPA was mainly made up of members of the Loyal Orders.
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The courageous deeds and sacrifices of the RUC and UDR must never be airbrushed from history .

Weejoey1920

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #24 on: October 12, 2020, 09:21:27 PM »
Hello. No not writing a book but interested in writing a play. Have you personal knowledge of the UPA?
I'd never heard of it before until I saw this thread , so maybe not as well known as some might suggest.
 My granda was in the U. P. A. ulster protestant association. 1920s.  What is it u want to know.

Weejoey1920

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2020, 10:04:11 PM »
. It's obvious bigali hasn't a baldy what you're talking about. My GRANDA was in the UPA,. 1920s. Ulster protestant association. East Belfast. Think they were the original UPA. My granda, buck alex and a few others were judased by the unionist government. Plain n simple!!!!

Bigali

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2020, 10:43:25 PM »
. It's obvious bigali hasn't a baldy what you're talking about. My GRANDA was in the UPA,. 1920s. Ulster protestant association. East Belfast. Think they were the original UPA. My granda, buck alex and a few others were judased by the unionist government. Plain n simple!!!!

You seem to be mixing my quotes up with your own plus you seem to be saying that I “don’t have a baldy” like it’s some bad thing or it’s remiss of me not to know about it , you then go on to say your Granda was involved with it in East Belfast in the twenties which underlines the fact it wasn’t a thing in North Antrim just like I said but a Belfast based organisation.

By the way wasn’t Buck Alex from North Belfast and not East and how was your granda and his mates “judased “ ?
 ???
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Bread Basket

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #27 on: October 13, 2020, 04:52:50 PM »











Bread Basket

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2020, 05:10:42 PM »
There is far too much material for me to cover and screenshot so here is just a flavour across some years. In saying that if anyone has a specific date or event that they know of then I will gladly have a trawl through the papers.














Weejoey1920

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Re: Ulster Protestant Association UPA
« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2020, 08:25:45 PM »
The buck was from the North. My granda from the east. They were still good friends. The two faced unionist government interned them and deported them. End of story.