Author Topic: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA  (Read 4790 times)

manitoba

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2019, 03:16:33 PM »
I have a couple of nephews in Campbell River BC.Worked in Gimli for Saunders Aircraft for two years but lived in Selkirk. 1974-76.Talk about a small world. I had bypass surgery done on my left led about 6 weeks ago and the surgeon Dr. Alice Boyd, was conceived in Belfast bur born in Toronto. Her Grandfather played for Glentoran in the 1920s. She did my surgery of a Friday and left for a visit to Belfast on the Saturday.
Well keep on waking up on the right side of the grass.Manitoba

manitoba

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2019, 03:26:54 PM »
Don't know what is going on, Just did a post to reply to your answer but for some reason it didn't post!
I worked in Gimli in1974-76 for Saunders Aircraft. What a culture shock moving from Toronto to Manitoba. Didn\t live in Gimli but in Selkirk.
Talk about a small world. I had bypass surgery on my left leg 6 weeks age and my surgeon Dr. Alice Boyd was conceived in Belfast and born in Toronto, She did my surgery of a Friday and left for Belfast on the Sat to visit relatives. Her Grandfather played for Glentoran in the 1920s.
I have a couple of nephews living in Campbell River.

Well just keep on waking up on the right side of the grass.

moorsy

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2019, 06:19:02 PM »
I have a couple of nephews in Campbell River BC.Worked in Gimli for Saunders Aircraft for two years but lived in Selkirk. 1974-76.Talk about a small world. I had bypass surgery done on my left led about 6 weeks ago and the surgeon Dr. Alice Boyd, was conceived in Belfast bur born in Toronto. Her Grandfather played for Glentoran in the 1920s. She did my surgery of a Friday and left for a visit to Belfast on the Saturday.
Well keep on waking up on the right side of the grass.Manitoba

It never surprises me who you meet, when we started having kids in the Peg in the 70s we had Dr. Murray whose dad came from Belfast. Then one time we were at Minaki Lodge in the middle of nowhere and we met people whose grandad was minster of 1st.Presy. church in Belfast.
Used to shop in Selkirk when living in Gimli and in 2017 tried to buy a house in Campbell river but could,nt pull the trigger fast enough as the prices kept going up so fast.
Second choice was here in Creston and dont regret it. One lady from Larne lives here that we have met.

What was it like coming over as a teenager?

i,m out of my mind,but feel free to leave a message.

moorsy

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i,m out of my mind,but feel free to leave a message.

manitoba

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #19 on: May 28, 2019, 11:06:45 PM »
My sister, brother in law and family had immigrated in 1957,I already had an uncle and family who came out in 1954. So just a month past my 16th birthday with $62.00 (25 pounds) I arrived. They were pushing the 16 year olds to stay in school but I couldn't afford to go to school and my sister with whom I was staying with surely couldn't afford to keep me as she had 3 young ones herself. So it was job hunting for me. I had already been working full time in Belfast having left school in 1956.Here is my recall of my first day in Canada. First day in Canada.

 Sometime in the morning my sister Irene, took me downtown to get a winter jacket. We caught the streetcar on Lakeshore Road and went down Queen Street, we got off at Young street and she showed me Eatonís and Simpsons, we walked around a bit then headed east to Spidina Ave. We stopped in at a restaurant Queen St & Spidina to have a coffee and I spotted what I thought was chocolate pie but it wasnít, it was pumpkin pie. So the first piece of pie I had in Canada was pumpkin, it was the first time I ever had pumpkin and it was good too.
   
Well on the Monday March 17, I got a job. My first job in Canada was with Universal Form Block Company, they made forms for the construction industry for pouring concrete walls. Of course I had to start right away and the place was off Kipling Ave. north of the Queensway.
 The man at the unemployment told me how to get there. I think I ran all the way. Down the Lakeshore Blvd. to 18th St (Kipling Ave.) and a mile or more up Kipling Ave. I guess I got there about 9 or 9:30 and they put me to work.   
We worked 5 Ĺ days a week then and every day I would walk the couple of miles to work in all kinds of weather. I didnít get paid that first week as the held a week back in those days. On the following Thursday or Friday I got my first pay, I was paid by cheque and I hadnít got a clue what to do with it. I got paid $1.25 an hour, $55.00 for a 44 hour week; I paid $6.00 income tax and $0.85 unemployment insurance so there I was with a piece of paper, a cheque for $48.15. (up until then I had always been paid in cash) 
A couple of the guys said that they were going to the bank to cash their chequeís so I went with them. I didnít have a bank account then so I handed the teller my cheque, she gave it back to me and asked me to endorse it , I guess I looked at her with a dumb look, sign it she said. So I signed and she gave me the money. You sure couldnít do that today.
 I can say that I was never homesick although my sister Irene was. For the first few years she suffered from headaches and although she liked her life in Canada she was never rally settled and yearned to go back home. About eight years after her arrival in Canada she finally could afford a trip back to Belfast. She stayed with my mother and after the first week she was cured of her homesickness and couldnít wait to get home to Canada.
May 20,1965 was a highlight; the whole family went to Brampton court house along with about a hundred others to be sworn in and swear out allegiance to Canada and receive our Canadian Citizenship. Went in an immigrant and came out a citizen. I still have my original Canadian Citizenship papers.
Canada didnít offer immigrants a free ride but rather it offered everyone the opportunity to use their skills, their abilities and their ingenuity to get a fresh start in life. I was fortunate that I didnít have a problem with having to learn the language, but other nationalities had a more difficult time being accepted.
As long as I was willing to work and was interested in learning the job or skill, I found that people did not hesitate to help you better yourself. The opportunity for furthering ones education was there and I certainly took advantage. I worked many jobs; construction, truck driver, ware-houseman, underground miner and continued to educate myself. I joined the Canadian army and acquired additional skills including self-discipline and self-reliance.
I volunteered as a Scout Leaded for over 25 years and enjoyed teaching and watching the youth learn new skills and grow. It was gratifying when a former scout showed up with his son to enroll him in the program.
I have worked and traveled all across Canada, Newfoundland is the only Provence that I have not visited. Wherever I traveled I found the locals friendly and willing to help and that if one met people half way help was always offered if needed.

Manitoba

 

moorsy

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2019, 12:12:01 AM »
Thanks for info. Sounds like your sister lived in Mimoco area. when in Toronto lived in Leeside.  Will send you a P.M.
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manitoba

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2019, 03:27:20 PM »
My long journey to Canada
I arrived in Toronto on March 1958 but my journey actually started in July 1929, 13 years before I was born. My father decided to immigrate to Canada and he left his pregnant wife and two year old daughter and sailed from Belfast, Ireland on the ship the Andania, of the Cunnard line and arrived in Quebec on July 27, 1929. He travelled to Toronto and there joined my Uncle, who had immigrated in May, they boarded with a Mrs. Kelly in the Lonsdale Ave. in the west of Toronto.

Well in October 1929 the stock market crashed and threw lots of men out of work. It also changed his plans for bringing the family to Canada.
He told me stories about the country and the weather and the cold winter and what he did to make money to send home to my mother. He rode the rods on the train to different towns and cities across Canada trying to find work. I donít know what he did or worked at while in Canada, he may have told me but I cannot remember. I do remember some of the things he did and he told me that he did anything to make money to keep himself and to send money home to my mother.
He used to tell me that Mrs. Kelly would give him what for because he never buttoned up his collar button in the winter, he said the cold never bothered him, he said that sometimes it so cold that metal would stick to your hand and if you were not careful you would pull the skin off your hand trying to let go of the metal.

He told of riding on rods beneath the trains as he traveled across the country looking for work and he was not alone as thousands of others were doing the same because they had no money to buy a ticket. But through all the hardship he loved Canada.

In the spring or summer of 1930, he got a job of painting the exterior of two houses, he was paid fifty dollars and he had to supply the paint. He said that he bought the oil and made his own paint.

By this time my mother was begging home to come home as she was alone and raising two young children as my brother had been born in March. I donít recall exactly when  in 1930 , I suspect it was late summer or fall that he had to go to the government and asked to be sent back home as work was difficult to get there was little money to send home.
Of course there were not the social programs then as there are today.
I don't recall what happened to my uncle Bill wither or not he returned as well.
He always wanted to come back to Canada but my mother would not hear of it and refused to emigrate. Maybe she was afraid that history would repeat itís self as young girl in 1912, her family immigrated to the states but turned back due to health problems.  One of her sisters was blind.
   
So, growing up in the late 1940sí I heard many stories of his life in Canada.  I guess thatís why I immigrated to Canada at age 16 in March 1958.
I landed in Malton (Toronto Intl airport) on March 11, 1958.

It seemed the natural thing to do to immigrate to Canada; after all, I grew up hearing about stories of his time in Canada.  I like to think that my fatherís one regret was that he was not going with me as he loved Canada. 
My sister and her family had immigrated in 1957 and settled in Toronto, Ont. I applied to Canada house and was granted approval and arrived in Toronto March 11, 1958.

So what defines Canada for me?
Canada didnít offer immigrants a free ride but rather it offered everyone the opportunity to use their skills, their abilities and their ingenuity to get a fresh start in life. I was fortunate that I didnít have a problem with having to learn the language, but other nationalities had a more difficult time being accepted.
As long as I was willing to work and was interested in learning the job or skill, I found that people did not hesitate to help you better yourself. The opportunity for furthering ones education was there and I certainly took advantage. I worked many jobs; construction, truck driver, warehouseman, underground miner and continued to educate myself. I joined the Canadian army and acquired additional skills including self-discipline and self-reliance.
I volunteered as a Scout Leaded for over 25 years and enjoyed teaching and watching the youth learn new skills and grow. It was gratifying when a former scout showed up with his son to enroll him in the program.
I have worked and travelled all across Canada, Newfoundland is the only Provence that I have not visited. Wherever I traveled I found the locals friendly and willing to help and that if one met people half way help was always offered if needed.
Gander, Newfoundland in September, 2001 is what defines Canada for me.
To me Canada is the best country in the world. Yes it has its problems and it certainly has its challenges. New comers today have it a lot easier than we did 60 years ago. There are a lot more social programs and government assistance available to new immigrants and refugees. It will not be an easy road to make Canada your home but if they show that they are willing to do their part to help the country grow then Canadians will always offer a helping hand.

moorsy

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2019, 05:30:23 PM »
Well said Pat  ;)
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JA

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2019, 04:28:44 AM »
moorsy, into my 52nd year in London Ontario. It has been a very good life. That is a lovely wee town you live in. I have some very nice memories of Creston. :drinks:

Strath_Roy

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2019, 01:31:46 PM »
Toronto, London, Strathroy. Arrived Toronto Jan. 1958
The world suffers a lot.
Not because of bad people.
But because of the silence of good people.
Napoleon

moorsy

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2019, 04:48:27 PM »
moorsy, into my 52nd year in London Ontario. It has been a very good life. That is a lovely wee town you live in. I have some very nice memories of Creston. :drinks:

Hi J.A.  mostly know London from the # 401, but one time I was caught in a snowstorm picking up computers that were on loan to a convention at the Holiday Inn. The guy running the Banquet hall turned out to be from Belfast and he set me up to ride out the storm with the booze and food left over from the convention. Good time.

Tell me more how you know Creston ? a hidden gem in the Rockies.
i,m out of my mind,but feel free to leave a message.

moorsy

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #26 on: June 03, 2019, 04:50:26 PM »
Toronto, London, Strathroy. Arrived Toronto Jan. 1958

 ;) Always knew there were lots of people here a long time, but its slow getting them to post.
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manitoba

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #27 on: June 03, 2019, 08:27:39 PM »
Moorsy,
So what attracted you to Creston BC?
Of all the replies to the thread I wonder how log it was before any one want back to Belfast for a visit.
For me it was 48 years (2006) before I went back. I was amazed, the place had changed,modernized but I was still the same. I never felt lost, of course the one way streets were something else again. I knew where I wanted to go but getting there was a challenge. I liked the way they kept the old building fronts and built new behind them. The only down side was showing my son where I grew up on Agnes St only to find the old houses torn down and the area modernized. Well the old school Helmsworth Square (the Henhouse) was still there. I went back again in 2016 for another visit.

moorsy

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #28 on: June 03, 2019, 11:17:03 PM »
Moorsy,
So what attracted you to Creston BC?
Of all the replies to the thread I wonder how log it was before any one want back to Belfast for a visit.
For me it was 48 years (2006) before I went back. I was amazed, the place had changed,modernized but I was still the same. I never felt lost, of course the one way streets were something else again. I knew where I wanted to go but getting there was a challenge. I liked the way they kept the old building fronts and built new behind them. The only down side was showing my son where I grew up on Agnes St only to find the old houses torn down and the area modernized. Well the old school Helmsworth Square (the Henhouse) was still there. I went back again in 2016 for another visit.

It was 38 years until I went back (2007) and I was back again in 2009.  Only one sister left back there now.I have,nt any real attachment  to the place,was.nt even born there.

Tired of big cities and having passed through Creston on trips to the west coast, always liked it and the great fruit growing area around it. And the house prices were right.
i,m out of my mind,but feel free to leave a message.

JA

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Re: FIFTY YEARS IN CANADA
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2019, 03:49:02 AM »

Hi J.A.  mostly know London from the # 401, but one time I was caught in a snowstorm picking up computers that were on loan to a convention at the Holiday Inn. The guy running the Banquet hall turned out to be from Belfast and he set me up to ride out the storm with the booze and food left over from the convention. Good time.

Tell me more how you know Creston ? a hidden gem in the Rockies.


Hi Moorsy, At least it all ended well for you getting stuck in London, much better than getting stuck somewhere on the 401.

I always thought of Creston as somewhat like the town in Northern Exposure. I used to visit the Columbia Brewery, the last time in 1998/99, just before I retired. There was always lots to see and do after work.  I remember crossing the border to Bonners Ferry, Sandpoint or the odd time visit Spokane, and the border guard would always remind us Ö. as he opened the gate Ö. " don't forget the border gate closes at 11pm" And of course around Lake kootenayÖ with some great restaurants. They were happy times. As you said "a hidden gem in the Rockies".