Author Topic: Sisters die Weeks apart,  (Read 1663 times)

White dee

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2019, 03:01:51 PM »


'More drug-related deaths in Northern Ireland involve prescription pills than illicit drugs ... that frightens me', (2017 ) it would appear, things have got a lot worse,

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/health/more-drugrelated-deaths-in-northern-ireland-involve-prescription-pills-than-illicit-drugs-that-frightens-me-35856462.html
Justice for all the innocent/ unarmed People who were
Gunned down by the British Soldiers,
For no other reason then their religion,were murdered.

GEMMA

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2019, 04:26:52 PM »
Always seems a bit unnecessary to me to type out the words already contained in the link intro. It would be better to introduce the link with a personal opinion of the content therefore showing that you had actually read the story rather than just copied and pasted. Just an observation and opinion, do carry on.

James James

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2019, 04:43:42 PM »

Billy Fish

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2019, 07:00:40 PM »
No personal point scoring involved here just a straightforward legitimate and valid question as to what involvement the fathers of these now tragically orphaned children have in this matter .

It has been suggested that some research into the drug problem might suit me better , thatís a fair comment from someone who knows nothing about me because if they did they would know that Iím more than likely more up to par than they are about the scourge of drugs in Northern Ireland through my work.

Like it or not these two women showed a breathtaking selfishness by continuing to have children even though they knew they were addicted to drugs but yet somehow their problems are seen by some to be everyone elseís fault , how is that ? Any addiction can be a horrendous life destroying thing and Iím not for one minute trying to make light of that but itís a well known fact that in any addiction admitting that you have a problem and meaningfully seeking help are the first steps in beating the problem and by that I donít mean crying ďI have a problemĒ whilst continuing to stuff drugs down your throat and then claiming that no one helps . Stop self pitying and start helping yourself , family members also need to help instead of just waiting for a tragedy like this and then claiming nothing was done to help , what help did the families seek for these women ? .

I await the inevitable onslaught of anti Bigali posts.

Ps . If any research is to be done as was suggested, I would suggest that contraception would be a good place to start.

Good post.  O0 O0
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James James

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2019, 09:07:16 PM »
This other recent thread, refers to the issues of prescription medication addiction and mental illness, that are mentioned in this thread.

"drug addiction"        http://www.belfastforum.co.uk/index.php/topic,76367.0.html

Blake

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2019, 09:15:47 PM »
No personal point scoring involved here just a straightforward legitimate and valid question as to what involvement the fathers of these now tragically orphaned children have in this matter .

It has been suggested that some research into the drug problem might suit me better , thatís a fair comment from someone who knows nothing about me because if they did they would know that Iím more than likely more up to par than they are about the scourge of drugs in Northern Ireland through my work.

Like it or not these two women showed a breathtaking selfishness by continuing to have children even though they knew they were addicted to drugs but yet somehow their problems are seen by some to be everyone elseís fault , how is that ? Any addiction can be a horrendous life destroying thing and Iím not for one minute trying to make light of that but itís a well known fact that in any addiction admitting that you have a problem and meaningfully seeking help are the first steps in beating the problem and by that I donít mean crying ďI have a problemĒ whilst continuing to stuff drugs down your throat and then claiming that no one helps . Stop self pitying and start helping yourself , family members also need to help instead of just waiting for a tragedy like this and then claiming nothing was done to help , what help did the families seek for these women ? .

I await the inevitable onslaught of anti Bigali posts.

Ps . If any research is to be done as was suggested, I would suggest that contraception would be a good place to start.
interestingly ideas! Oddly, when anyone questions the role of a father in a kidís life, or the composition of a family, or the choices people make, they are accused of being judgmental,  sexist, misogynist,  prejudiced etc,     
artist formerly known as "that wee man from West Belfast"

Blake

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #21 on: May 11, 2019, 09:44:31 PM »
Of course they are, especially by 'some people'.  ::)
I donít know who... but I was thinking about this stuff ( botvthese sisters because I donít know them) because Iíve seen very many kids here who have been abused or neglected, but amazingly many adults, while they are sympathetic to the kids, think itís ď judgementalĒ to suggest that parents should make efforts to raise their kids, or that men should not have ď baby mommasĒ!all over town with the inevitable results for the  impoverished kids.

artist formerly known as "that wee man from West Belfast"

Billy Fish

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2019, 01:56:52 AM »
I donít know who... but I was thinking about this stuff ( botvthese sisters because I donít know them) because Iíve seen very many kids here who have been abused or neglected, but amazingly many adults, while they are sympathetic to the kids, think itís ď judgementalĒ to suggest that parents should make efforts to raise their kids, or that men should not have ď baby mommasĒ!all over town with the inevitable results for the  impoverished kids.

Correct, but not shared by all, or 'some'.  ::)
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James James

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Re: Sisters die Weeks apart,
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2019, 11:58:46 AM »
"April 20 2019"
https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/charity-in-mental-health-plea-after-two-suicides-at-belfast-hospital-38033098.html

"Charity in mental health plea after two 'suicides' at Belfast hospital"

"This month has seen two possible suicides at the Royal Victoria Hospital"



"A charity has called for more to be done to improve mental health services following two possible suicides at a Belfast hospital."

Quote,...

PIPS https://pipscharity.com/ said greater action is needed to help people in crisis, with one worker revealing that children as young as six have come forward looking for help to cope with suicidal thoughts.

PIPS has called for an overhaul in the way mental health services here are delivered.

It follows two possible suicides at the Royal Victoria Hospital.

It is understood a woman, believed to be a member of staff, was found in a toilet cubicle at the hospital having suffered an overdose on April 11.

The PSNI said detectives are investigating the circumstances surrounding the sudden death, but said it was not being treated as suspicious.

It is also investigating a separate sudden death of a man at the hospital on Thursday, which police said is also not being treated as suspicious.

The Belfast Trust has not commented on either death.

Claire Thompson from PIPS said: "What is happening in Belfast at the moment is no different to what is happening every other year.

"There are 300 deaths through suicide in Northern Ireland every year; you're five times more likely to die by suicide than on the roads.

"And the fact is that these deaths are preventable.

"Suicide rates in Northern Ireland have doubled over the past 20 years, while England, Scotland and Wales have seen a decline."

Ms Thompson said the legacy of the Troubles continues to contribute to high suicide rates here.

"Exposure to a traumatic event linked to the Troubles increases the risk of a person experiencing suicidal thoughts," she said.

Ms Thompson also said a lack of services for addictions to alcohol and drugs play a part in the high suicide rate.

"We don't have a specialist inpatient unit in Northern Ireland, which would be extremely helpful," she said, adding:

"There is only one mental health nurse in the whole of Belfast who assesses people in a mental health crisis.

"It can take about five hours for them to get to see someone who is in crisis and that's simply not good enough.

"This also means that a lot of police resources are tied up dealing with keeping people safe when health professionals are not available.

"There are also more and more young people presenting, there are even children as young as six expressing a wish to die.

"It is hugely distressing that this can happen.

"We would like to see more services put in place, although at the same time, it is important to recognise the amazing work that is being done out there.

"There are a lot of charities and other organisations working to help support people in a mental health crisis.

"However, this is an issue that we must do more to tackle - the effects of suicide are devastating, and we know that a person who is directly affected by suicide, they are three times more likely to go on and make an attempt on their own life."

Anyone who is experiencing a mental health crisis, or who feels they need support can telephone Lifeline on 0808 808 8000 or ring the Samaritans on 116 123.