Author Topic: Travelling Around Northern Ireland  (Read 2455 times)

derdrei

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2019, 09:05:55 AM »
One the best places in Belfast The Divis and Black Mountains one the loveliest places to walk visit and lucky for me was on our door step in the murph great wee walks of a Sunday yo the mountain loney catching spricks frogspawn galore the natural drinking water spring and of course the beautiful bluebell fields ah yes Co Antrim at its best  :-*
I agree with you would not find a more beautiful place ,walked up there many times , loved it wish I could walk up again maybe one day.

Ballymurphygirl

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #16 on: September 27, 2019, 10:21:39 AM »
Excellent post SB and yes your right todayís travellers just not the same like you Iíve lived in a few places before my marriage I did work in those places I actually lived in London for a while and it mezmerized me at 17 Iím sure itís changed now  :)  travel wasnít easy bk then but it was exciting as a teenager always drawn bk to home though donít think many appreciate what beautiful places we do have until we are older   my best place   Dubia   absolutly  :-* 
The truth will set you free . I support Ballymurphy & Derry families Justice for the innocent

Ballymurphygirl

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2019, 10:23:42 AM »
I agree with you would not find a more beautiful place ,walked up there many times , loved it wish I could walk up again maybe one day.
we had heaven on our doorstep derdrie   that was even before Dermot hill loved  the freedom  :-*
The truth will set you free . I support Ballymurphy & Derry families Justice for the innocent

Chris C

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2019, 08:40:23 PM »
My Father would walk us up to the Hatchet Field, seemed to us like a different planet , so much to do and see.

tours

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #19 on: September 28, 2019, 02:48:33 AM »
My Father would walk us up to the Hatchet Field, seemed to us like a different planet , so much to do and see.
My Mother and Father courted in the Hatchet Field. 1947ish.
Thats the field directly behind Dermothill?
I have always wanted to climb it, from the Whiterock.
I spent my childhood on the Cave hill.
I know it, like the back of my hand.
My father RIP always said 'the best thing about the Cavehill, its free..'
So true, as any of the hills around the City.
Schools should make it compulsory, for kids to do a school trip to any Belfast Hills.
Be great for them. 👍
Sandwhiches at the top..😊
Maybe do it, during the 'Trans gender' class/period/topic/module...🙄
Good all round... 🙄 Escape..


stickleback

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2019, 07:17:32 PM »
[qu that ote author=Chris C link=topic=77758.msg2164969#msg2164969 date=1569613223]
My Father would walk us up to the Hatchet Field, seemed to us like a different planet , so much to do and see.

I don't know where the Hatchet Field is, Chris. But that's irrelevant. There is so much that is so beautiful on most peoples doorsteps that travelling abroad isn't even necessary. Many people who travel abroad just do it because it's somehow expected to show you are somehow doing well in life. None of my grandparents, only one of which I met for five minutes, ever got to travel outside N. Ireland. Unfortunately, I'm not sure they saw much more than the terraced streets of Belfast. Same with my parents, apart from my old man's time in the army.

Travelling abroad won't teach you much new unless you want to learn about different ways of life. I did travel through other cultures but in doing so if I learnt one lesson it's that I am most comfortable in my own, hence my favourite travels were around the US and Canada. The only true exception was Italy, which might seem strange for a protestant boy. I get a feeling there which is hard to put into words.


WCE004

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2019, 08:14:55 PM »
I am looking forward to traveling around Ireland on an already set path, from Belfast to Dublin, later this month but am not so pumped about driving for stretches on the opposite side (from U.S.) Is it possible to find drivers for hire for five days that are not art of a formal tour company?

Chris C

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2019, 09:13:07 PM »
Hi Stickleback, sorry, should have said that the comment was in reference to the Black Mountain. The Hatchet field was accessed by going up the Whiterock Road , straight over at the junction with the Springfield Road and it seemed the longest hill climb ever. Bearing left and stopping at a natural stream for a cold drink of water beside a small white farm house. Then onwards and upwards to a sloping green field where we played cowboys and Indians , generally ran ourselves dizzy eventually heading home . Some place, cost nothing, fifty plus yrs ago.

JohnKelly

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #24 on: October 04, 2019, 01:55:40 AM »
I am looking forward to traveling around Ireland on an already set path, from Belfast to Dublin, later this month but am not so pumped about driving for stretches on the opposite side (from U.S.) Is it possible to find drivers for hire for five days that are not art of a formal tour company?

Just a suggestion - Instead of going directly from Belfast to Dublin, consider driving up through the Glens of Antrim, along the north coast into Donegal and then down the west coast as far as County Kerry and then to Dublin.

Make use of the B and B's and partake of the famous Irish Breakfasts which must include Black Pudding.

There are many north American visitors to Ireland and they find no problem switching driving habits.

Been there, done that. :)

Cheers.


Ballymurphygirl

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #25 on: October 04, 2019, 11:13:19 PM »
I am looking forward to traveling around Ireland on an already set path, from Belfast to Dublin, later this month but am not so pumped about driving for stretches on the opposite side (from U.S.) Is it possible to find drivers for hire for five days that are not art of a formal tour company?
sure itís a lovely drive it only takes two hours from Belfast to dub and like the last poster says the drive round Antrim coasts class enjoy your trip  :-*
The truth will set you free . I support Ballymurphy & Derry families Justice for the innocent

Ballymurphygirl

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #26 on: October 04, 2019, 11:14:08 PM »
[qu that ote author=Chris C link=topic=77758.msg2164969#msg2164969 date=1569613223]
My Father would walk us up to the Hatchet Field, seemed to us like a different planet , so much to do and see.

I don't know where the Hatchet Field is, Chris. But that's irrelevant. There is so much that is so beautiful on most peoples doorsteps that travelling abroad isn't even necessary. Many people who travel abroad just do it because it's somehow expected to show you are somehow doing well in life. None of my grandparents, only one of which I met for five minutes, ever got to travel outside N. Ireland. Unfortunately, I'm not sure they saw much more than the terraced streets of Belfast. Same with my parents, apart from my old man's time in the army.

Travelling abroad won't teach you much new unless you want to learn about different ways of life. I did travel through other cultures but in doing so if I learnt one lesson it's that I am most comfortable in my own, hence my favourite travels were around the US and Canada. The only true exception was Italy, which might seem strange for a protestant boy. I get a feeling there which is hard to put into words.
on your doorstep SB the black mountain  ;)
The truth will set you free . I support Ballymurphy & Derry families Justice for the innocent


stickleback

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2019, 10:49:27 PM »
Hi Stickleback, sorry, should have said that the comment was in reference to the Black Mountain. The Hatchet field was accessed by going up the Whiterock Road , straight over at the junction with the Springfield Road and it seemed the longest hill climb ever. Bearing left and stopping at a natural stream for a cold drink of water beside a small white farm house. Then onwards and upwards to a sloping green field where we played cowboys and Indians , generally ran ourselves dizzy eventually heading home . Some place, cost nothing, fifty plus yrs ago.

Thank you, Chris. Welcome to the forum You've got the right idea. Keep it real to your own experiences and ideas.

GandT

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Re: Travelling Around Northern Ireland
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2019, 10:19:08 PM »
[qu that ote author=Chris C link=topic=77758.msg2164969#msg2164969 date=1569613223]
My Father would walk us up to the Hatchet Field, seemed to us like a different planet , so much to do and see.

I don't know where the Hatchet Field is, Chris. But that's irrelevant. There is so much that is so beautiful on most peoples doorsteps that travelling abroad isn't even necessary. Many people who travel abroad just do it because it's somehow expected to show you are somehow doing well in life. None of my grandparents, only one of which I met for five minutes, ever got to travel outside N. Ireland. Unfortunately, I'm not sure they saw much more than the terraced streets of Belfast. Same with my parents, apart from my old man's time in the army.

Travelling abroad won't teach you much new unless you want to learn about different ways of life. I did travel through other cultures but in doing so if I learnt one lesson it's that I am most comfortable in my own, hence my favourite travels were around the US and Canada. The only true exception was Italy, which might seem strange for a protestant boy. I get a feeling there which is hard to put into words.


Agree with everything in this post. The poet Paddy Kavanagh wrote that we 'have lived in important places' and that even the great legends of the world began with 'a local row'. I lived in East Belfast as a kid and, strange for a Catholic boy, loved my childhood perspective on the shipyards, the launching of ships / boats, the clang and clatter of the yard, the industry and the 'life' in and around the whole area. [I hope some will allow me those memories without a history of employment practices]. Some of the most civilised, courteous and, in my view, 'educated' people [not formal education] came from the most deprived areas and probably never travelled outside Ireland [maybe even NI].

Italy - ah, now you're talking. Beautiful weather, beautiful cities, wonderful culture and a sense of the timeless and the eternal [whether Christian or pagan]. The lazy, strange decadence of Venice...better stop or I'll be heading to the travel agent!