Author Topic: Serious sleuthing needed  (Read 738 times)

cookstown

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Re: Serious sleuthing needed
« Reply #15 on: November 05, 2019, 01:59:14 PM »
Some more possible information of interest i have found after a good hoke through various sites.  I have came across the following who perished on the Leinster.  Private J Byrne (9308) East Lancashire Regiment, Depot Section.  Buried at Grangegegorman Military Cemetry, Cabra, County Dublin.  Plot RC 636. Memorial I.D. 57621251.

Regards Cookstown

17124

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Re: Serious sleuthing needed
« Reply #16 on: November 05, 2019, 11:13:29 PM »
I have seen on St Patrick's baptism record that Peter Junior's father put his own name as Peter on his baptism record instead of Patrick. Just wonder if Peter the son did likewise with his name that is used both Peter and Patrick?
You can see where all the confusion comes from!  However, the most important record is that of the first born where the father registered the birth & signed his name (with hs mark) as Patrick, presumably, he gave the name Patrick.  All the other children were registered by the mother, the second child's registration he is also named as Patrick.  Then it would seem that after he is no longer in the army, he suddenly becomes Peter?? 

just like to put this one in the pot for consideration. I dont have the name but what I may have is the possible incident so here goes.  On the 10 October, 1918 a ship called the RMS Leinster set sail from Ireland to go to Holyhead.  It was one of four ships called after the Irish Provinces i.e. Munster, Ulster, Connaught and of course Leinster.  It ran the mail service between Ireland and the UK.  The people on board were a mixture of nationalities both made up of civilians and Service personnell.  During the course of its journey to Holyhead it was torpedoed by a German U Boat (UB123) and sank with the loss of over 500 lives both civilian and service people.  Needless to say it made the headlines and only last year was a major article in the Irish Times.  Fair to suggest there possibly was both military and civilian funerals. As I said at the start cant find your name your looking for but think this is worth some thought.
Regards Cookstown  PS  If you google british/Irish ships torpedoed 1918 you should see bits/bobs there.     
Had me going there for a minute until Argo found the people on board list.   Is there a definitive list that show other ships in similar circumstances in 1918 that can be searched? 

I do appreciate everyone's time & help.   

Argo

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Re: Serious sleuthing needed
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2019, 01:21:56 PM »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_shipwrecks_in_1918
Here's list of 1918 ships lost but getting people lost on them is going to be a stretch. But good luck.

cookstown

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Re: Serious sleuthing needed
« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2019, 10:52:54 PM »
With respect to Argo i can find nothing to show a difinitive list of deaths on the Leinster.  Emminent Author and Historian, Philip Lecane, Dublin who has carried out extensive research and written books on the subject has clearly stated that the exact number of casaulities was never found.  The people on board were a mixture of service people and civilians.  THe two places that felt the tragedy most were Dunlaughiore and Holyhead as most of the crew and postal workers lived in both.  There was 400 plus service personnel lost ranging from nurses to allied forces on leave from the western front.  As usual polotics entered the fray and as Ireland was going through  a difficult time for some reason the tragedy was played down.  Not withstanding this was to be Irelands biggest maritime tragedy.  Point of interest one of the Leinster's sister ship R.M.S. Connaught was torpeoded on the 3 March 1917 in the English Channel by U42 and sank with the loss of 3 crewmen..

Regards Cookstown