Author Topic: A 70 year old Belfast poet has who chronicled Belfast has died and been praised  (Read 267 times)

James James

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"6 Oct 2019"       https://www.theguardian.com/books/2019/oct/06/ciaran-carson-obituary

"Ciaran Carson obituary"

"Poet who superimposed a psychic overlay on the streets and terraces of his native Belfast"       etcetera,...

 

"7 October 2019"    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-49957337

"Tributes paid to Belfast poet Ciaran Carson who died aged 70"

Quote,...

Irish President Michael D Higgins has led tributes to Belfast poet Ciaran Carson.

The 70-year-old, from the Lower Falls Road, died on Sunday.

The TS Eliot Prize and Forward Prize recipient published 15 volumes of poetry and wrote a number of books.

Mr Higgins fondly recalled travelling to the Scottish island of Iona with Mr Carson and said the latter's "love of the Irish language lasted throughout his life".

Mr Carson, born in 1948, grew up speaking Irish as his first language.

"Writing right up to the end, with the text forthcoming, he will be missed by all who had the privilege of knowing or reading his work," Mr Higgins said.

In 2003, Mr Carson served as the first director of the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen's University, where he once studied.

He had also worked for the Arts Council of Northern Ireland as a specialist in traditional music and culture.

Among his most famous work was the award-winning Belfast Confetti, published in 1989.         etcetera,...

stickleback

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I have just read this, James.

I am truly shocked and saddened.

Ciaran Carson was without question one of the finest writers Belfast has produced. He truly loved Belfast and he thought about the city in such an imaginative way. Carson was an academic so on first reading the message would sometimes go over the head, but if you persevered he repaid your loyalty in bucketloads. Like Seamus Heaney, Carson was a master of language. He would often use grammatical references to illustrate his point. So, for example, where others would talk about a 'shower of missiles' etc, Carson called it a 'fusillade of question marks'. ( Belfast Confetti). For anyone interested in Belfast literature I would recommend his prosework The Star Factory. Ciaran was also a very gifted musician and regularly performed with his wife at Irish music events and at readings. Carson grew up on the Falls Road and although his work is academic he always remained true to his working-class upbringing.

I first discovered Ciaran Carson with his book Belfast Confetti. I went through my entire school education never having had the privilege to study literature. I used to walk into bookshops and not have a clue where to start. I just picked it off the shelf, read it and started telling my mates about it. Several of them knew him and asked me to come with them to meet him in a pub where he played Irish music. I bottled it. Not because it was across the cultural divide, that never bothered me at all because I regularly crossed the dividing lines. It was because I was a secondary school kid and I thought I was too thick to meet a poet. That's what secondary schools do. They teach you to be thankful for small mercies and to know your place. I regret that missed opportunity now.

Ciaran Carson

Belfast Confetti ( in his own voice)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLiXqjGmBOo

Ciaran Carson being interviewed by the black London rapper Akala:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XA2CH6izNA

James James

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Very interesting and articulate post and observations.

He also sounds great. 

"Blackbird Book Club: Ciaran Carson"         https://youtu.be/6k38rdOEA4M

"Poet and novelist Ciaran Carson reads some of his poetry and discusses his obsession with the written word at the Blackbird Book Club, part of Queen's University's Open Learning course."
"Filmed by CultureNorthernIreland."

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/615040.The_Star_Factory


GandT

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I have just read this, James.

I am truly shocked and saddened.

Ciaran Carson was without question one of the finest writers Belfast has produced. He truly loved Belfast and he thought about the city in such an imaginative way. Carson was an academic so on first reading the message would sometimes go over the head, but if you persevered he repaid your loyalty in bucketloads. Like Seamus Heaney, Carson was a master of language. He would often use grammatical references to illustrate his point. So, for example, where others would talk about a 'shower of missiles' etc, Carson called it a 'fusillade of question marks'. ( Belfast Confetti). For anyone interested in Belfast literature I would recommend his prosework The Star Factory. Ciaran was also a very gifted musician and regularly performed with his wife at Irish music events and at readings. Carson grew up on the Falls Road and although his work is academic he always remained true to his working-class upbringing.

I first discovered Ciaran Carson with his book Belfast Confetti. I went through my entire school education never having had the privilege to study literature. I used to walk into bookshops and not have a clue where to start. I just picked it off the shelf, read it and started telling my mates about it. Several of them knew him and asked me to come with them to meet him in a pub where he played Irish music. I bottled it. Not because it was across the cultural divide, that never bothered me at all because I regularly crossed the dividing lines. It was because I was a secondary school kid and I thought I was too thick to meet a poet. That's what secondary schools do. They teach you to be thankful for small mercies and to know your place. I regret that missed opportunity now.

Ciaran Carson

Belfast Confetti ( in his own voice)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLiXqjGmBOo

Ciaran Carson being interviewed by the black London rapper Akala:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XA2CH6izNA

Excellent and very apt tribute to one of our best. Thank you, Stickleback - like you I am shocked and sad to hear this. Thank you, Ciaran for your insight and humanity! Rest in peace.