Author Topic: Press ganged  (Read 516 times)

BLOOMFIELD

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Re: Press ganged
« Reply #15 on: November 29, 2019, 07:09:38 AM »

My understanding was that vacancies in these jobs were handed down from father to son and there was no way an outsider could get a look in.

Cheers.

 Wasn't it also that way , on the Belfast Docks ...  ??? ::)
"If someone tells me I've hurt their feelings, I say 'I'm still waiting to hear what your point is'."

Bread Basket

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Re: Press ganged
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2019, 08:01:49 AM »
G'day Bread Basket, further to your above quoted post, I'm not sure what the current situation is but I recall the days of the Painter and Dockers which were a very militant union and were always in the headlines along with the Warfies.

My understanding was that vacancies in these jobs were handed down from father to son and there was no way an outsider could get a look in.

Cheers.
Hi John, not sure on whether or not Painters had a similar system but YES it is true to say that in many cases the “Button” was handed down from Father to Son. If extra labour was needed to load or unload a ship the men and boys would gather as shown in the picture above and the stevedore would select from the crowd the extra manpower. He would know if the Son of a Docker was in the crowd and if he didn’t know the person by sight then no doubt he would have been told by the Father (with the Button) who to look out for. That was the way it was. If you were non related to a Docker and managed to get selected then your luck was in that day.

https://www.folkloreproject.ie/dockers/

Belfast Dockers wore a Blue Button. I have to say that I never recalled seeing it attached to their belt as in the linked article. I always knew it to be on the lapel of their jacket or on the peak of their cap.