Author Topic: Unemployment Benefit 1926  (Read 296 times)

Tipperdarby

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Unemployment Benefit 1926
« on: February 26, 2020, 03:52:14 AM »
I wonder if any of you can help me please.
Someone sent me a small paragraph from the Northern Whig 25 Nov 1926 which states.

John O’Neill (my Grandfather) from Bradford Sq. was prosecuted at the Belfast Summons Court yesterday for making a false declaration in order to secure Unemployment Benefit by declaring that his son Arthur was attending Donegal St National School, whereas he was struck off the roll in 1924. The form was lodged in April 1926.
There were four summonses in all, and defendant was fined 5s in each.

Why would my Grandfather have received Unemployment Benefit because his son was at school? Uncle Arthur was born on Jun 15 1912.  I am also wondering why he would have been at a school on Donegal St. .I am sure my Dad attended St Joseph’s. .mind you he was much younger.

I love these human interest stories ;)

Eileen

Elwyn

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2020, 11:08:00 AM »
     Eileen,
 
I don’t have any authoritative source to say what the rules were in 1926 but it sounds as though, to be eligible for the benefit, you probably had to have dependent children. And the definition of dependent probably meant still at school. (If they had left school, arguably they could work and might not be seen as dependent). So he lied about Arthur attending school to qualify.
 
Today you sometimes see people getting into trouble for making claims based on living alone and having no other support or assistance, but Social Security investigators discover a partner or lodger living at the same address. Same sort of issue. Not being candid about your true circumstances.
 
Elwyn

Bread Basket

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2020, 11:36:57 AM »
I wonder if any of you can help me please.
Someone sent me a small paragraph from the Northern Whig 25 Nov 1926 which states.

John O’Neill (my Grandfather) from Bradford Sq. was prosecuted at the Belfast Summons Court yesterday for making a false declaration in order to secure Unemployment Benefit by declaring that his son Arthur was attending Donegal St National School, whereas he was struck off the roll in 1924. The form was lodged in April 1926.
There were four summonses in all, and defendant was fined 5s in each.

Why would my Grandfather have received Unemployment Benefit because his son was at school? Uncle Arthur was born on Jun 15 1912.  I am also wondering why he would have been at a school on Donegal St. .I am sure my Dad attended St Joseph’s. .mind you he was much younger.

I love these human interest stories ;)

Eileen

Hi Eileen,
When you say St Joseph’s do you mean Earl St school?

Tipperdarby

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2020, 02:13:50 PM »
Hi Eileen,
When you say St Joseph’s do you mean Earl St school?
You’re right Bread Basket....that is where my Dad went to school. He was Gerald O’Neill born in Oct 1923.  Bradford Sq was between Steam Mill Lane and Tomb St.
Eileen

Bread Basket

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2020, 09:21:12 PM »
You’re right Bread Basket....that is where my Dad went to school. He was Gerald O’Neill born in Oct 1923.  Bradford Sq was between Steam Mill Lane and Tomb St.
Eileen
Now there you go.... your Father would have been in the same class as one of my Uncles,  Alfie Murphy also born 1923 👍🏼😁

Bread Basket

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2020, 09:46:51 PM »
This is Earl Street School. The footnote says 1930 BUT the cars in the pic say different.



All my family going back to the early 1900’s went to Earl St... as I did 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣😁👍🏼



Unfortunately the school list has been cropped too much.... i’ll try to find my original copy with all of the names.


Tipperdarby

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2020, 02:09:33 AM »
Oh, thank you so much for all of this Bread Basket, I really appreciate any info that brings me closer to my lovely Dad. That is great that he would have known your Uncle! My understanding was that he left school when he was 14 so in 1933 his name should have been on that list. He was orphaned in 1931 but he lived with 2 of his brothers and his sister. His sister married in Dec 1932 and my Dad went to live with the newlyweds. However in Mar 1937 his sister died in a fire leaving 2 babies. My Dad went back to live with his brothers and in Dec 1937 when Arthur was married he went to live with them. He joined the Irish Army for a few years then went to sea as a Merchant Seaman. He was at sea during  the war and they dropped off Canadian troops at Juno Beach on DDay. He loved the life but he “came ashore” as he put it in 1950 just before I was born.

I would have seen Earl St School when I was a child. .my sisters and I grew up in Ardoyne but every now and then Daddy would bring us “down our way” and we would walk around the streets that were so familiar to him. Bradford Sq was long demolished by then but we had to see where it used to be. Despite the sad childhood my Dad was a lovely gentle soul and the glass was always half full. He was full of love for my Mom and his 4 daughters and then his 12 grandchildren. He had a beautiful big smile right to the end. He died 10 years ago on Mar 6.
Thanks again
Eileen

MargaretS

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2020, 11:12:58 AM »
Bradford square
Was not demolished/knock down till the late 1980s or the early90s
There were only two or three houses in It  by then
The families moved to new houses in Lancaster st  and Thomas st
The crimes of the B specials the R U C the U D R and the British ARMY should never be forgotten   justice for all
no matter how long it takes

Tipperdarby

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Re: Unemployment Benefit 1926
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2020, 11:30:02 PM »
     Eileen,
 
I don’t have any authoritative source to say what the rules were in 1926 but it sounds as though, to be eligible for the benefit, you probably had to have dependent children. And the definition of dependent probably meant still at school. (If they had left school, arguably they could work and might not be seen as dependent). So he lied about Arthur attending school to qualify.
 
Today you sometimes see people getting into trouble for making claims based on living alone and having no other support or assistance, but Social Security investigators discover a partner or lodger living at the same address. Same sort of issue. Not being candid about your true circumstances.
I am very sorry Elwyn, somehow I missed this reply!
Thank you, what you say makes perfect sense.
Eileen