Author Topic: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute  (Read 728 times)


Bigali

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2020, 09:02:40 AM »

Great idea  O0

We Will Remember Them.

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The courageous deeds and sacrifices of the RUC and UDR must never be airbrushed from history .

moorsy

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2020, 02:57:59 PM »
What an excellent idea and one which I will participate in,

https://www.news.com.au/national/breaking-news/call-for-anzac-day-driveway-tribute/news-story/40a12bbd05b3645597ae1537257ef584?fbclid=IwAR0jVP75xTWXx4hK5_h229PdbxG8aPjs1Neh39iVYHCbIK4udFDN3rT_XJ4

Why do it at 6am John.?    Seems a strange time to get a lot of people out, but I guess there is a good reason.
i,m out of my mind,but feel free to leave a message.

JohnKelly

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2020, 02:22:03 AM »
Why do it at 6am John.?    Seems a strange time to get a lot of people out, but I guess there is a good reason.

Gd'day moorsy, given that there will be no formal dawn services throughout the nation, the suggestion was made for each household to pay tribute at 6 am in their respective driveways.
6 am is the traditional time of the dawn service and the following quoted text from the Australian War Memorial gives an explanation as to the reason for the dawn service.

 The following text is from the Australian War Memorial website:

The Dawn Service observed on Anzac Day has its origins in an operational routine which is still observed by the Australian Army today. The half-light of dawn plays tricks with soldiers' eyes and from the earliest times the half-hour or so before dawn, with all its grey, misty shadows, became one of the most favoured times for an attack. Soldiers in defensive positions were therefore woken up in the dark, before dawn, so that by the time the first dull grey light crept across the battlefield they were awake, alert and manning their weapons. This was, and still is, known as "Stand-to". It was also repeated at sunset.

After the First World War, returned soldiers sought the comradeship they felt in those quiet, peaceful moments before dawn. With symbolic links to the dawn landing at Gallipoli, a dawn stand-to or dawn ceremony became a common form of Anzac Day remembrance during the 1920s; the first official Dawn Service was held at the Sydney Cenotaph in 1927. Dawn services were originally very simple and followed the operational ritual; in many cases they were restricted to veterans only. The daytime ceremony was for families and other well-wishers, the Dawn Service was for old soldiers to remember and reflect among the comrades with whom they shared a special bond. Before dawn the gathered veterans would be ordered to "stand to" and two minutes of silence would follow. At the end of this time a lone bugler would play the "Last Post" and then concluded the service with "Reveille".

 In more recent times families and young people have been encouraged to take part in dawn services, and services in Australian capital cities have seen some of the largest turnouts ever. Reflecting this change, the ceremonies have become more elaborate, incorporating hymns, readings, pipers and rifle volleys. Others, though, have retained the simple format of the dawn stand-to, familiar to so many soldiers.
 


moorsy

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2020, 02:32:39 AM »
Got it.  I understand the time for the Vets,  but did,nt think it was extended to families.

Perhaps the biggest Churchill blunder, Gallipoli,   he sent the lads in against all the advice of the generals.
i,m out of my mind,but feel free to leave a message.

JohnKelly

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2020, 02:59:56 AM »
Got it.  I understand the time for the Vets,  but did,nt think it was extended to families.

Perhaps the biggest Churchill blunder, Gallipoli,   he sent the lads in against all the advice of the generals.

Mr Keating on Remembrance Day made the following comments on Gallipoli in so far as Australia was concerned which I have truncated,

Keating said it was only as a result of a “loyalty to imperial Britain” that Australians returned to the killing fields of Europe.

“By 1915 we had no need to re-affirm our European heritage at the price of being dragged to a European holocaust,” Keating said.

“We had escaped that mire, both sociologically and geographically. But out of loyalty to imperial Britain, we returned to Europe's killing fields to decide the status of Germany, a question which should earlier have been settled by foresight and statecraft.”
 

JohnKelly

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2020, 10:20:38 AM »
Intended to look like this,


JohnKelly

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2020, 10:58:52 PM »

jillyfred

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Re: Anzac Day Driveway Tribute
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2020, 12:11:07 PM »
Thank you John for this Thread.

The Photograph is beautiful.

We Will Remember Them.

jilly