Belfast Forum

Belfast Boards => Belfast History and Memories => Topic started by: Christopher on January 23, 2009, 06:47:29 PM

Title: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Christopher on January 23, 2009, 06:47:29 PM
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little Children", which tells her story about life in the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Orphanage on the Ormeau Road during the 1950s and 1960s,
has just been published by Orion Books.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Eleanor on January 23, 2009, 06:53:52 PM
I knw a girl in the 60s and 70s who lived in the orphanage on the Antrim Road nearFortwilliam Park. I can't remember thw name or who ran it.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: stickyra on January 24, 2009, 08:42:15 AM
Williamson House.  It was closed down in disgrace in the eighties because of the abuse scandal.  I knew a lot of those kids, might well know the girl you are talking about Eleanor but I don't want to mention her name for confidentiality.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Cunningham on January 28, 2009, 04:30:26 AM
I was placed in St Josephs baby home in Belfast and later transferred to Nazareth House (Lodge) around 2 yrs old where I stayed until I was 6 years 1963-1969 anyone else there during that time?
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: stickyra on January 28, 2009, 10:04:33 AM
Wasn't there, Cunninham, but I lived near it and my ma used to take some kids out for the day every week.  We might be oul buddies!
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: bnf on January 28, 2009, 10:32:01 PM
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little ChildrenOrion Books.
christopher,
sorry to correct you, but
FRANCES REILLY   SUFFER THE LITTLE CHILDREN
ORION BOOKS    10.99
bnf    O0
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Cancer2003 on February 04, 2009, 11:37:25 PM
Hi Folks.

Hopefully someone can help a newbie in distress - lol!

Wonder if anyone would be able to tell me the name of names and addresses of orphanages (probably catholic) in Belfast from between 1902 - 1920 ?

At the moment I'm trying to find out any info regarding EDWARD FRANCIS MURRAY. I think Edward may have been illegitimate. Perhaps he was registered with his mother's maiden name (Murray??) He could of course be the child of a protestant father and catholic mother and that is why he was in an orphanage.

The information I have on Edward Murray (my G/Father on the paternal side) is from his marriage cert.
   
Edward got married on the 6th August 1927, at Holy Cross RC Church, Standish Point, Liverpool. Aged 25. Address is 29 Marlborough Street, Liverpool, that Edward was residing at (this was my Nan's family home).   

My paternal grandparents' marriage is:
   
Marriages Sept 1927
Dilworth Annie L Murray Liverpool 8b 316
Murray Edward F Dilworth Liverpool 8b 316
   
Edward's Father's name was Michael Murray (deceased,that's what it said on the marr cert) & that Michael had been a Dock Laborer (that's what it said on the marr cert)

However as a child I'd been led to believe that Edward has spent his childhood in a Belfast orphanage!

 Also what's your opinion on this info I found last night?
   
  Name: Edward Murray
  Registration district: Belfast
  Record type: BIRTHS
  Registration date - quarter and year: Oct - Dec 1903
  Estimated birth year:
  Age:
  Mother surnames:
  Film number: 101069
  Volume: 1
  Page: 384
  Digital GS number: 4193983
  Image number: 00577
  Collection: Ireland, Civil Registration Indexes 1845-1958.
   
Many many thanks in advance
   
Regards Nicky x
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: D H on February 05, 2009, 02:55:51 PM
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little Children", which tells her story about life in the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Orphanage on the Ormeau Road during the 1950s and 1960s,
has just been published by Orion Books.
I am not at all happy to see a photo of myself as a child in nazareth house in the papers. You should have respected the other kids privacy and blanked them out of the photo.I find it odd that Frances taught herself to read & write, We were in the same class & got a good education.even though we were sent out of class to do a bit of cleaning,I passed the 11+exam.Yes jeyes fluid was put in the bath but we were not scrubbed with it by the nuns.We had outings to the Ormeau Park & at xmas we went to parties in taxies up the Falls Rd.We had sweets from the tuck shop.Although Nazareth House wasnt a good place to be I would not compare it to the Magdaline Laundrys.
D O Donoghue
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Eleanor on February 05, 2009, 08:37:52 PM
I am not at all happy to see a photo of myself as a child in nazareth house in the papers. You should have respected the other kids privacy and blanked them out of the photo.I find it odd that Frances taught herself to read & write, We were in the same class & got a good education.even though we were sent out of class to do a bit of cleaning,I passed the 11+exam.Yes jeyes fluid was put in the bath but we were not scrubbed with it by the nuns.We had outings to the Ormeau Park & at xmas we went to parties in taxies up the Falls Rd.We had sweets from the tuck shop.Although Nazareth House wasnt a good place to be I would not compare it to the Magdaline Laundrys.
D O Donoghue

D H, I think you can only object to a photo in a paper if you own the photo and it has been published without your permission.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: D H on February 17, 2009, 12:29:41 PM
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little Children", which tells her story about life in the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Orphanage on the Ormeau Road during the 1950s and 1960s,
has just been published by Orion Books.
I would like to make it clear that I took no part  what so ever in this book Suffer the Little Children.
This book was written long before the author contacted me.
I have also made it clear I want my name removed from the acknowledgements.
D O Donoghue
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Andi on February 17, 2009, 12:53:08 PM
D H

I can see you feel really strongly about this and, although I don't know the ins and outs about the rights of publishing photographs, I agree that permission should have been sought from you.  The author has a moral obligation (to the person involved) but I would have thought the publisher would have insisted on some kind of permission being obtained.   :-\
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: D H on February 17, 2009, 05:01:38 PM
It is not so much the photo that I feel annoyed and very angry about. it is mainly the contents of the book.  The nuns were certainly no angels  but no way as bad as this book makes out. I dont know if you have read it but one thing we did get in there was an education.  I knew nothing about the contents of the book till I read it last week. I was furious as I was reading it.  Theres just too much that doesnt add up and yes I was in N House, in the same group as this person and in the same class. D O Donoghue
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 17, 2009, 05:37:39 PM
We brought home a boy every year from the Nazareth Lodge when I was a young lad, we didn't have much but we shared, his name was Tony Bradley...I hope and pray everything went well for him in life
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: pussy-galore on February 17, 2009, 06:18:12 PM
We brought home a boy every year from the Nazareth Lodge when I was a young lad, we didn't have much but we shared, his name was Tony Bradley...I hope and pray everything went well for him in life

What does that mean?  ???
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Andi on February 17, 2009, 06:18:35 PM
Hi D H

I haven't read it and, although I try to 'support' local writers, doubt if I will ever read it.  I tend to avoid the mis-lit genre mostly because there seems to be a saturation overall of such books.  I read Angela's Ashes years ago and don't think I've ever read that type of book again.  I can't comment on either your or Frances Reilly's experiences at Nazareth House but I can see you feel very strongly about the whole situation and hope things get resolved for you.   
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: stickyra on February 17, 2009, 06:26:07 PM
What does that mean?  ???

In those days any responsible looking mother could go into the orphanage and take a child out for the day or longer. (No RUC check - nothing!) My mother used to do it.  We would get a wee friend to play with for the day and we always had a great time.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 17, 2009, 06:28:19 PM
Pussy Galore, what was confusing to you about my message???

 We brought home a boy every year (we brought him home for the summer), it was a break and a charitable thing to do

Explain what was confusing about that message
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: pussy-galore on February 17, 2009, 06:32:12 PM
Pussy Galore, what was confusing to you about my message???

 We brought home a boy every year (we brought him home for the summer), it was a break and a charitable thing to do

Explain what was confusing about that message

I was only wondering what was meant by "brought a boy home" - i know nothing about orphanages, so i wanted to learn - hope you don't mind me asking.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 17, 2009, 06:42:00 PM
Oh... Orphanages is where children that either have been abandoned, or put up for adoption by  parent(s) that can't care from them, or in other cases taken away for care due to neglect. I'm surprised you don't know anything about them, there's many movies, books, topics are in the newspapers all the time...recommend you find out about them as it's a topic people should be aware of and help where you can...
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: stickyra on February 17, 2009, 06:44:29 PM
Glenb I think she understands the basic reasons for the existence of children's homes but she was genuinely wondering about taking kids out - she definately wasn't taking the p 'ss
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: pussy-galore on February 17, 2009, 06:47:36 PM
Oh... Orphanages is where children that either have been abandoned, or put up for adoption by  parent(s) that can't care from them, or in other cases taken away for care due to neglect. I'm surprised you don't know anything about them, there's many movies, books, topics are in the newspapers all the time...recommend you find out about them as it's a topic people should be aware of and help where you can...

That, as you well know, is NOT what i meant - you think you are being smart in answering me like so - I DO know what an orphanage is - i do not know the ins and outs of the day to day running of them. Why are you so defensive?
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: pussy-galore on February 17, 2009, 06:49:16 PM
Glenb I think she understands the basic reasons for the existence of children's homes but she was genuinely wondering about taking kids out - she definately wasn't taking the p 'ss

Thankyou Stickyra - my question really WAS genuine.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Andi on February 17, 2009, 06:55:56 PM
Hi Glenb

I didn't realise either that families took children out for a while - I think it was a genuine query.  How generous too of families to do that  O0
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 17, 2009, 07:07:24 PM
It was common across Belfast, Ardoyne people were well known for hosting them, in the summer you would have orphans living with various families, they got treated better than their us as they didn't get much over all in the home. They were very well behaved (unlike us), we also brought them home at Christmas, most of my Santa photos where with orphans....I intend to find Tony Bradley to see if he even remembers me and to find out what happened to him in life ...most of it has to be done via post due to confidentiality reasons and if the person themselves even want to talk about it

Also, some one mentioned Angela's Ashes...before I say anything recommend you ask the people in Limerick about that book, I'm an acquantance with one of the Brothers of the family, their father was a belfast man, think he died up in Lenadoon
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Andi on February 17, 2009, 07:17:35 PM
Hi Glenb

It sounds as if there was a good community infrastructure if families were hosting the children from the orphanages  :)

It was me who mentioned Angela's Ashes - what did you mean by asking people in Limerick about the book?  Had they a particular 'feeling' about it and how it represented Limerick?  :)
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: danso on February 17, 2009, 07:36:16 PM
It was common across Belfast, Ardoyne people were well known for hosting them, in the summer you would have orphans living with various families, they got treated better than their us as they didn't get much over all in the home. They were very well behaved (unlike us), we also brought them home at Christmas, most of my Santa photos where with orphans....I intend to find Tony Bradley to see if he even remembers me and to find out what happened to him in life ...most of it has to be done via post due to confidentiality reasons and if the person themselves even want to talk about it

Also, some one mentioned Angela's Ashes...before I say anything recommend you ask the people in Limerick about that book, I'm an acquantance with one of the Brothers of the family, their father was a belfast man, think he died up in Lenadoon
i see tony bradley every day
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Andi on February 17, 2009, 07:50:27 PM
Hi danso

Who's tony bradley?  Is he related to Frank McCourt who wrote Angela's Ashes?
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: danso on February 17, 2009, 07:53:28 PM
Hi danso

Who's tony bradley?  Is he related to Frank McCourt who wrote Angela's Ashes?
he was in nazerath lodge seen his name mentioned on forum was just speaking to him on phone
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Andi on February 17, 2009, 07:57:28 PM
Sorry Danso - I get your drift now.  He's the person Glenb wants to contact - I was thinking at cross purposes  O0
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Kateme on February 17, 2009, 07:58:28 PM
It was common across Belfast, Ardoyne people were well known for hosting them, in the summer you would have orphans living with various families, they got treated better than their us as they didn't get much over all in the home. They were very well behaved (unlike us), we also brought them home at Christmas, most of my Santa photos where with orphans....I intend to find Tony Bradley to see if he even remembers me and to find out what happened to him in life ...most of it has to be done via post due to confidentiality reasons and if the person themselves even want to talk about it

Also, some one mentioned Angela's Ashes...before I say anything recommend you ask the people in Limerick about that book, I'm an acquantance with one of the Brothers of the family, their father was a belfast man, think he died up in Lenadoon

Yes, Glen B, we had neighbors in Butler Street who took orphans out sometimes for the day, or week or whatever.  I remember one boy staying next door - very nice boy.  
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 17, 2009, 08:33:56 PM
Andi, yes they (Limerick People) had very strong opinions about the McCourts recollections, many in complete  disagreement

I suppose there's two sides to every coin and it depends on memories
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: stickyra on February 17, 2009, 08:37:49 PM
Nowadays it would all be unheard of.  As a foster carer I cannot even let my kids stay in anyone elses house unless all over 18s in the house have Garda clearance.  Even regular vistors to our home, including great grandfather, have to be Garda checked.  Myself and my wife had to do two years training, assessment and preparation before they approved us!
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Liz51 on February 17, 2009, 08:43:40 PM
Nowadays it would all be unheard of.  As a foster carer I cannot even let my kids stay in anyone elses house unless all over 18s in the house have Garda clearance.  Even regular vistors to our home, including great grandfather, have to be Garda checked.  Myself and my wife had to do two years training, assessment and preparation before they approved us!
I THINK IT IS BRILL WHAT YOU DO GOOD LUCK TO YOU & YOUR FAMILY FOR GIVING THESE CHILDREN HELP TO GET ON WITH THERE LIVE'S :)
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Kateme on February 17, 2009, 08:47:39 PM
Andi, yes they (Limerick People) had very strong opinions about the McCourts recollections, many in complete  disagreement

I suppose there's two sides to every coin and it depends on memories
I think my Dad told me that the McCourts lived in the country in Antrim at one time - he remembered them.  He read Angela's Ashes and it was his opinion that Mr. McCourt embellished things quite a bit.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 17, 2009, 08:49:31 PM
Your Father is probably right, but the Da was a Belfast man, again he died up around Andersonstown
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Liz51 on February 17, 2009, 08:53:46 PM
Your Father is probably right, but the Da was a Belfast man, again he died up around Andersonstown
YEAH I HAVE THE DVD VERY SAD TO WATCH THINK THE DA LET THE FAMILY DOWN BIG TIME . POOR MAN DON'T THINK HE KNEW WHAT HE DID THE DRINK AGAIN
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: D H on February 17, 2009, 09:29:30 PM
Hi D H

I haven't read it and, although I try to 'support' local writers, doubt if I will ever read it.  I tend to avoid the mis-lit genre mostly because there seems to be a saturation overall of such books.  I read Angela's Ashes years ago and don't think I've ever read that type of book again.  I can't comment on either your or Frances Reilly's experiences at Nazareth House but I can see you feel very strongly about the whole situation and hope things get

I wouldnt expect anyone who wasnt in N House to comment. You have to have been in N House to know what did and what didnt happen . My issues will soon be resolved
.D O Donoghue

Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: twocoats on February 17, 2009, 09:38:29 PM
Frank McCourt was born in Brooklyn in 1930. As he said in his book they must have been the only Family to emigrate from America back to Ireland.

His father was from the North, but remember he was born in Ireland when Ireland was all one Country.

He wrote the book from memory and I doubt that he embellished it too much. I am writing a book about my early childhood and my memories are not necessarily the same as my Mothers.

Having said that I must comment on the book vs. the movie. It is the first time I have seen a book and a movie so closely interacted. It may have to do with the fact that Frank was on the Movie Set or that the Director was able to truly relate the Limerick that Frank lived in.

All in all a great tale and I think that for the most part a true tale.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: stickyra on February 18, 2009, 07:55:51 AM
I THINK IT IS BRILL WHAT YOU DO GOOD LUCK TO YOU & YOUR FAMILY FOR GIVING THESE CHILDREN HELP TO GET ON WITH THERE LIVE'S :)

Thanks for your support Rathbone
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Eleanor on February 18, 2009, 10:09:55 AM
Frank McCourt was born in Brooklyn in 1930. As he said in his book they must have been the only Family to emigrate from America back to Ireland.

His father was from the North, but remember he was born in Ireland when Ireland was all one Country.

He wrote the book from memory and I doubt that he embellished it too much. I am writing a book about my early childhood and my memories are not necessarily the same as my Mothers.

Having said that I must comment on the book vs. the movie. It is the first time I have seen a book and a movie so closely interacted. It may have to do with the fact that Frank was on the Movie Set or that the Director was able to truly relate the Limerick that Frank lived in.

All in all a great tale and I think that for the most part a true tale.

Good luck with the book Coats. My Mum watched all the TV programmes and listened to all the radio programmes about Angela's Ashes when it was first published. She told me that people in Limerick were incensed and felt that much of it was exaggerated. I don't care; it's a great book and the film was very enjoyable.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Eleanor on February 18, 2009, 10:10:52 AM
Your Father is probably right, but the Da was a Belfast man, again he died up around Andersonstown

I thought he came from Toomebridge, or was that his parents? :-\
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: stickyra on February 18, 2009, 10:21:11 AM
He came from Randalstown and he was living in Lenadoon, west Belfast when he died
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Eleanor on February 18, 2009, 11:31:11 AM
He came from Randalstown and he was living in Lenadoon, west Belfast when he died

Ah! Thanks! :)
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Kateme on February 18, 2009, 02:52:43 PM
I thought he came from Toomebridge, or was that his parents? :-\
My father was from Toomebridge - as I mentioned, he remembered the McCourts - not sure if it was parents or children.  He didn't have a great opinion of them.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: twocoats on February 18, 2009, 04:16:43 PM
My father was from Toomebridge - as I mentioned, he remembered the McCourts - not sure if it was parents or children.  He didn't have a great opinion of them.

If you read the book and watch the Movie you will see that nobody had a great opinion of the McCourts. Both in New York and in Ireland. Even the Mothers side detested the Father.

That's what makes the story real. He didn't hide anything and didn't try to say that he or his Family were anything other than what they were. He told it as he remembered it, warts and all.

Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 18, 2009, 05:44:44 PM
Twocoats, read the book, watched the movie, and talked to one of the McCourt brothers many times, read interviews with their old neigbors,nice man

Nothing to do with destest as you state in my opinion, the question brought up in many of these interviews was accuracy

More than one neighbor stated how nice the family was, and also that while things were poor, they were not like what was described in the movie and book

I'm not disputing what was captured as I don't know, but there is a significant amount of people that have a very different memory as depicted
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: glenb on February 18, 2009, 05:45:41 PM
Toomebridge!!!!! great place, my own Granda was from around there (the Creagh as it's known locally), Staffordstown and Cranfield relatives there also
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: twocoats on February 18, 2009, 05:57:55 PM
Twocoats, read the book, watched the movie, and talked to one of the McCourt brothers many times, read interviews with their old neigbors,nice man

Nothing to do with destest as you state in my opinion, the question brought up in many of these interviews was accuracy

More than one neighbor stated how nice the family was, and also that while things were poor, they were not like what was described in the movie and book

I'm not disputing what was captured as I don't know, but there is a significant amount of people that have a very different memory as depicted

No problem Glenb.

My post was just my opinion based on the book and movie and a couple of documentries.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Kateme on February 18, 2009, 09:09:06 PM
Toomebridge!!!!! great place, my own Granda was from around there (the Creagh as it's known locally), Staffordstown and Cranfield relatives there also
I think he said Tamlaghmore.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: irish dance on March 07, 2009, 11:02:43 PM
If you read the book and watch the Movie you will see that nobody had a great opinion of the McCourts. Both in New York and in Ireland. Even the Mothers side detested the Father.

That's what makes the story real. He didn't hide anything and didn't try to say that he or his Family were anything other than what they were. He told it as he remembered it, warts and all.

Would you agree that there were thousands on family's during that time that had even less than the McCourts and brought up
their families to the best of their ability, how Frank McCourt was able to write about his mother selling her body etc., amazes me
I have friends who lived in Limerick at the same time and know that he really elaborated on lots of things except his father's
drinking.  Belfast had hard times as well, my father had to go out to work aged 11 to help rear a family of five after his father died
aged 37 and with no Widow's Pension etc., my Grandmother managed to bring them up to be good honest citizens.                     
Getting back to Belfast Orphanages my Father used to go to Nazareth Lodge once a week to visit the babies and help the nuns
feed them.  I remember the nuns going round the houses. collecting money every week for the orphanage  One in particular,
Sister Killian, asked my father the day I was born would I take the name Killian for my confirmation - which I did.

Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Eleanor on March 08, 2009, 11:07:12 AM


Whether he was right or wrong to exaggerate his family's circumstances, it's a great read. If he'd only told the truth it might have been boring.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: irish dance on March 08, 2009, 04:24:17 PM
Whether he was right or wrong to exaggerate his family's circumstances, it's a great read. If he'd only told the truth it might have been boring.
Perhaps if Frank McCourt exaggerated about some of your ancestors in his book (which has been proven by most of the people
from Limerick whom he depicted in his book) perhaps you would not find it such a good read.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Eleanor on March 08, 2009, 04:59:01 PM
Perhaps if Frank McCourt exaggerated about some of your ancestors in his book (which has been proven by most of the people
from Limerick whom he depicted in his book) perhaps you would not find it such a good read.

True!
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: abneys on May 20, 2014, 09:42:25 AM
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little Children", which tells her story about life in the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Orphanage on the Ormeau Road during the 1950s and 1960s,
has just been published by Orion Books.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages Williamson house Antrim road
Post by: abneys on May 20, 2014, 09:45:45 AM
I am researching Williamson house Antrim road for the period the 70s/80s and would be interested  to hear from former residents and staff
Many thanks
D Corcoran
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Sean T Traynor on October 29, 2015, 02:39:28 AM
I have found a death entry for Mary Jane Trainor. 6th August 1922 at the St Joseph's Home mentioned. The address on the death entry states "Chichester Park" which I believe is off The Antrim Road. Another sad story of a poorly child, but at least I now know! :-([/size]
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: danso on January 11, 2016, 01:21:37 PM
We brought home a boy every year from the Nazareth Lodge when I was a young lad, we didn't have much but we shared, his name was Tony Bradley...I hope and pray everything went well for him in life
tony died on Saturday 9/1/16 sorry to say
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Thompson on February 17, 2016, 10:38:47 PM
Frances O'Reilly's book "Suffer the Little Children", which tells her story about life in the Poor Sisters of Nazareth Orphanage on the Ormeau Road during the 1950s and 1960s,
has just been published by Orion Books.
I was in Williamson house in the late 1050's early 1960's I was 7/8 years old I'm please to say it was a warm and pleasant place and they could not do enough for you, we were in the boy's side and if you went to the top of the house there was a small hatch door,we used to sneak through and pretend to be ghost in the attic walking around and going " Oooooooo" . When the staff came up we scattered into our beds.
Sometimes when I first got there it was quite a lonely place, first day I arrived I was sent into the big room ( well it was a big room to me,I came from a 2 up 2 down as they call it now , I prefer " a kitchen house") any way I was waiting on the matron and I had just come from the children court , the old red one, and I could hear the radio playing Elvis Singing ' can't you see I love please don't break my heart in two' it would have brought a tear to a glass eye, the tears were running down my face thinking of my wee mums face when they took me away!!!!!!!
An other little boy was drop off and came into the room, he give me a look that would kill, (luck I saw him being dropped off and had time to wipe my eyes and nose ) it was just the tonic I needed, I was back to normal.
I have meet lots of kids I knew and ones I dint know over many years and see that lost look in there eyes which stabs me every time because I recognise it from a 100yards and they know I understand with out the violin, I was really luck some thing in me would not let them ever get inside my head and beat me.
Sorry for going on reading some of your stories lite it up in me from then .
I'm now over the last few weeks putting some things down on paper for my children and grandchildren ( as I never told my children about the 15 years, on and off I was in different homes as I though it was none of there business), I was beaten by the masters as we called them and the bigger boys but that's the way it was then ever one was the same.
All I can say and I taught my children this and many more," the ones who were in charge and harmed you in any way don't hate them , as the scum do not know you are carrying thing all your life or CARE , it will eat you up,
There was an old peom and song in the late 1960's and in it was " be gently onto thy self " .
Albert. R . Nelson. East Belfast 1952.

Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Thompson on February 18, 2016, 03:03:12 PM
I was in Williamson house in the late 1050's early 1960's I was 7/8 years old I'm please to say it was a warm and pleasant place and they could not do enough for you, we were in the boy's side and if you went to the top of the house there was a small hatch door,we used to sneak through and pretend to be ghost in the attic walking around and going " Oooooooo" . When the staff came up we scattered into our beds.
Sometimes when I first got there it was quite a lonely place, first day I arrived I was sent into the big room ( well it was a big room to me,I came from a 2 up 2 down as they call it now , I prefer " a kitchen house") any way I was waiting on the matron and I had just come from the children court , the old red one, and I could hear the radio playing Elvis Singing ' can't you see I love please don't break my heart in two' it would have brought a tear to a glass eye, the tears were running down my face thinking of my wee mums face when they took me away!!!!!!!
An other little boy was drop off and came into the room, he give me a look that would kill, (luck I saw him being dropped off and had time to wipe my eyes and nose ) it was just the tonic I needed, I was back to normal.
I have meet lots of kids I knew and ones I dint know over many years and see that lost look in there eyes which stabs me every time because I recognise it from a 100yards and they know I understand with out the violin, I was really luck some thing in me would not let them ever get inside my head and beat me.
Sorry for going on reading some of your stories lite it up in me from then .
I'm now over the last few weeks putting some things down on paper for my children and grandchildren ( as I never told my children about the 15 years, on and off I was in different homes as I though it was none of there business), I was beaten by the masters as we called them and the bigger boys but that's the way it was then ever one was the same.
All I can say and I taught my children this and many more," the ones who were in charge and harmed you in any way don't hate them , as the scum do not know you are carrying thing all your life or CARE , it will eat you up,
There was an old peom and song in the late 1960's and in it was " be gently onto thy self " .
Albert. R . Nelson. East Belfast 1952.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: misssmyth1 on February 21, 2016, 11:58:12 AM
Thompson from what i read and between the lines too.  You are strong and although our experiences can either  haunt us or effect us in many ways  i believe we need to move on and although we can really never forget  them we can learn to live with them.. i am a strong believer in living for' now'  We deserve it...  So glad you are recording your memories for your family  they are important as they are a great part of what made us    US  ...
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: highdreamer on March 24, 2019, 02:11:39 AM
Hi I was in St Josephs Babies home but when I was there in 1989 the age of 7 to 1994 when I left at the age of 12 we called it St. Josephs childrens home...  which was along time ago but to this day I always wondered how it was shut down I know Nazareth house beside us horrible things happened there we used to go over to chapekl every Sunday until one day it totally stopped and we started going to Good Shepard .. we were very lucky  none of that happened in St. Josephs from what I know I was only ever in one unit the younger I know there were three.. ive always wondered what happened to the children when it shut down..I remember some of the staff there Mark McKimmons Adele Patricia Ray Connie Mcvey she was the nicest one there I finally moved out when I was 12 but to this day ive always wondered about some of the kids there and how their lives turned out it was sad seeing people come and go.. if anyone was there at that time I would love to hear from yous   :) :)
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: jillyfred on March 24, 2019, 08:51:57 AM
Welcome to the Forum Highdreamer.

I have no experience or knowledge with regard to your post,however,it was most interesting to read.

I hope life,in your later years has been kind and good to you.

God Bless.

jilly
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Lost_ali on April 12, 2019, 01:56:06 PM
Hi Folks.

Hopefully someone can help a newbie in distress - lol!

Wonder if anyone would be able to tell me the name of names and addresses of orphanages (probably catholic) in Belfast from between 1902 - 1920 ?

At the moment I'm trying to find out any info regarding EDWARD FRANCIS MURRAY. I think Edward may have been illegitimate. Perhaps he was registered with his mother's maiden name (Murray??) He could of course be the child of a protestant father and catholic mother and that is why he was in an orphanage.

The information I have on Edward Murray (my G/Father on the paternal side) is from his marriage cert.
   
Edward got married on the 6th August 1927, at Holy Cross RC Church, Standish Point, Liverpool. Aged 25. Address is 29 Marlborough Street, Liverpool, that Edward was residing at (this was my Nan's family home).   

My paternal grandparents' marriage is:
   
Marriages Sept 1927
Dilworth Annie L Murray Liverpool 8b 316
Murray Edward F Dilworth Liverpool 8b 316
   
Edward's Father's name was Michael Murray (deceased,that's what it said on the marr cert) & that Michael had been a Dock Laborer (that's what it said on the marr cert)

However as a child I'd been led to believe that Edward has spent his childhood in a Belfast orphanage!

 Also what's your opinion on this info I found last night?
   
  Name: Edward Murray
  Registration district: Belfast
  Record type: BIRTHS
  Registration date - quarter and year: Oct - Dec 1903
  Estimated birth year:
  Age:
  Mother surnames:
  Film number: 101069
  Volume: 1
  Page: 384
  Digital GS number: 4193983
  Image number: 00577
  Collection: Ireland, Civil Registration Indexes 1845-1958.
   
Many many thanks in advance
   
Regards Nicky x

Hi Nicky

I am told there was a mother and baby nursing home in Chichester Park, of the Antrim Road in Belfast called St Joseph's or The Palace. I am trying to trace relations from 1920's. I have been trying for a few years now to gain some information on this place myself. but, to no avail.

Ali
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Keyhole66 on May 17, 2019, 07:54:47 PM
We brought home a boy every year from the Nazareth Lodge when I was a young lad, we didn't have much but we shared, his name was Tony Bradley...I hope and pray everything went well for him in life
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Keyhole66 on May 17, 2019, 08:43:09 PM
I was inst Joseph's kids home beside Nazareth lodge 1979-1984 would love to hear from anyone else who was there then . I was in sister johns group , she was a lovely woman for a nun.if anyone has old pictures would love to catch up. Also read a post someone looking for Tony Bradley , he live in North Parade just of the Ravenhill rd not far from where Nazareth lodge used to be , hope that's of some help

Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: danso on May 17, 2019, 10:47:26 PM
Tony Bradley died about 2 years ago
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: Family ties on June 16, 2019, 09:00:18 AM
I wouldnt expect anyone who wasnt in N House to comment. You have to have been in N House to know what did and what didnt happen . My issues will soon be resolved
.D O Donoghue

D O Donoghue, I would love to know the truth please, from your opinion if even briefly. This book was written by an aunt *only by blood. Mother was the 6 week old baby *sinead but not sinead. She passed and obviously we have zero truths and childhoods have been marred and this excuse given. I would be open to honest and truthful opinions.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: derdrei on June 23, 2019, 12:38:45 PM
Hi Glenb

I didn't realise either that families took children out for a while - I think it was a genuine query.  How generous too of families to do that  O0
I did not either it would have been a great thing to do.
Title: Re: Belfast Orphanages
Post by: fliss on July 27, 2019, 06:57:29 PM
I was in N House Belfast but before that I was in an orphanage called Gleneyre....cant find anything on this place on Google search
I've also been trying to find info on the demolition of N House in 2003